Thursday, November 13, 2008

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Nov 9): A Pair of Animals, Running Wild in the Capital!

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Nov 9): A Pair of Animals, Running Wild in the Capital!:
Q: Take the names of two animals. Drop the third letter from each name. Read the remaining letters, in order, from left to right and you'll name a world capital. What is it?
There are several ways to approach solving this puzzle. You could look at lists of animals, or perhaps it might be easier to look at a list of world capitals. I don't think you'll find it too difficult. Oh, my clue this week is that "tiger" is not one of the animals. Does that help?

Edit: My clues were "Oh my" and "tigers". At least my clues were less obvious than some posted in the comments section. I had to delete one that had the outright answer. Please wait until after the Thu. 3pm ET deadline to post spoilers.
A: BEaR + LIoN --> BERLIN (Germany)

22 comments:

  1. Blaine, I'm not sure how your clue is... pertinent... relevant... what's that word I'm looking for? Anyway, this one's a... um, a tough one. I don't know if I'll be able to figure it out. And I'm telling the truth!

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  2. I'm sure that Carl, or Blaine, solved this by looking at an animal list first.

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  3. This one was easy for me. I just went through the list of world capitals.

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  4. This one made me growl!! Especially after the brilliant gent on-air today. My brain would have hibernated on a few of them.

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  5. There's potential for a somewhat circular clue involving the author of The Cider House Rules here...

    And I do not dissemble.

    Hey, I know it's not always a piece of cake but sometimes you just gotta grin and keep trying!

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  6. Natasha, Your approach worked for me.
    THANK YOU.

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  7. I was too distracted thinking about the down-ish stock market and hoping it comes roaring back - but I finally got it.

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  8. My main question is, does it poo in the woods?

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  9. both animals are hairy, herr doolittle. err...make that fuehry....errr...furry.

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  10. One of these animals may sometimes climb a tree, the other rules the safari as far as it can see.

    Together they form a word of recent unity. . .

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  11. maroons revisited... Another fun expression that I "invented" and which was already in use without my being aware of it: The bozone layer. Again, I made it up to fill in the "specific location" line in a Craigslist Rants & Raves post a longish time ago. Just for kicks I googled it this morning; there's a fun entry in the Urban Dictionary.

    And I'm not making this up! (that's another hint to this week's puzzle...)

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  12. Carl, "Setting Free the . . ."??
    Now I'm thinking about "bozone."

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  13. Each of the creatures in this puzzle's answer figure prominently in novels by a certain author, and his name, if you have a playful mind, also might lead you to the answer...

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  14. I came up with another answer:

    VIxEN + NAg --> VIENNA (Austria)

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  15. John Irving featured bears in three different books (Setting Free the Bears, The World According to Garp, and Hotel New Hampshire) and the plot of The Fourth Hand involved a character's losing a hand to a Lion. And if you free-associate his last name you will very likely think of Irving Berlin...

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  16. In The Wizard of Oz film Dorothy,
    Tin Man, and Scarecrow chant
    "lions, and tigers, and bears"
    just before entering a forest
    where they meed Cowardly Lion.

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  17. You forgot the last part, "Lions and tigers and bears! Oh, my!"

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  18. Since this puzzle was so like Oct 19th's
    (pick a name or pick 2 animals, drop some letters, come up with a world capital), I made the same kind of a comment with an imbedded anagram this time as I did then. I had decided not to do this again because an anagram is not clearly a clue without being too obvious, but in this case I could'nt resist.

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  19. And I offered a somewhat obscure clue with my saying I didn't see how Blaine's clue was.. pertinent... I was trying to suggest the word germane which is, of course, Germany with an extra letter. Then I said it was a... a tough one. Meant to suggest that this puzzle was a bear. Then said I'm telling the truth, as opposed to I'm not lyin'.

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  20. Blaine,
    Where is the new puzzle for today on your site?

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