Thursday, June 10, 2010

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jun 6, 2010): One Swell Foop

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jun 6, 2010): One Swell Foop:
Q: A 'spoonerism' is when you interchange the initial consonant sounds of two words to get two new words. For example, with 'right lane,' you'd get 'light rain.' Think of a familiar two-word phrase that's an instruction seen on many containers. 'Spoonerize' it to name two things seen at the beach. What's the phrase and what are the things?
I'm not happy with my current answer. Phonetically I have a problem with the sound on one of my words, so I'm hoping that perhaps there is a better answer.

Edit: The title of this post was a hint to the intended answer. As for my alternate answer, the key was the "Ph" in Phonetically.
A: SHAKE WELL --> WAKE, SHELL

Blaine's close miss: PULL HERE --> HULL, PIER

39 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any outright spoilers before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here. Thank you.

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  2. Not sure that this instruction is that common but I have seen it. Other than that, I think this was a swell puzzle, now I'm going to play some hake-sack.

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  3. Shiver me timbers! 'Tis a deep-un...

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  4. How sad that "things seen at the beach" now include tar balls and dead birds and dolphins.

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  5. Blaine, you listed this page under the categories of "patterns" and "sounds" but seem to have omitted "NPR".

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  6. The instruction rhymes with the description of an Oscar Wilde character.

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  7. This puzzle is making me falling asleep and withdrawing into my cocoon.

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  8. This puzzle is making me fall asleep and withdraw into my cocoon.

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  9. Easy puzzle but won't enter since I'll be gone Thursday. I have to go to the funeral of a friend who was killed pumping gas where he worked.

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  10. Al, congratulations on getting your puzzle chosen this week. How many times is that for you? Have you been a contestant as well?

    Looks like I have the same answer as the rest of you.

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  11. A tintinnabular container a small kiddo, say a baby, soooo is not! If she cries looooong, long into your night, then, Folks, you already know what you have to do: get it together and secure for yourselves some help for this situation -- -- ‘fore all of us others end up eyeing a Shiva urn containing, instead, her –– as ashes –– at its committal in the aftermath of such a child – killer.

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  12. Hey Dave. Thanks for noticing. This is the 5th time Will has used one of my ideas. I've never been on air with him but I have entered every week since 1998.

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  13. RoRo, Are you following in the footsteps of Ms. Litton of "White City"?

    As for my clue "rhymes with" is not strictly speaking correct, but is suggestive.

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  14. This has nothing to do with the current puzzle, but how do people feel about Liane retiring? I've always felt it would be fun to have a cup of coffee with her and listen to her stories. Some of the substitute hosts have not come off as warm as Liane usually does.

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  15. Mike - I'm really sad that Liane is leaving - I haven't heard any guest hosts that are as good as her - except perhaps Scott Simon, maybe they can get him to do Sat & Sun !

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  16. Though I’ve lived in St. Louis for many years, I’m originally from D.C. When I was back there on business a number of years ago, I called and arranged to see the broadcast of All Things Considered Saturday in person – just me, not as part of a pre-arranged group. (BTW, I don’t think they do that anymore post 9/11.) My “host” was that evening’s director though I’ve forgotten his name now.

    Anyway, we had some time to kill before air time and he showed me around all the floors and saw various studios and tons of equipment. He also introduced me to several staff people we passed in the hallways including Liane Hansen. We only spoke for a little while but she did – indeed – seem like someone who was very bright and friendly.

    I thought it was a good puzzle, Al, so thanks. I’ve probably sent Will half a dozen puzzles over the years but none have been used :(

    Chuck

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  17. Al, thanks for a puzzle I could actually solve. Got it as soon as I rose Sunday morning and glanced at some containers in the frig. I personally like it when the puzzles are solvable and more people can enter and have fun instead of spending the week scratching my head and trying to figure it out from obtuse clues. So, thanks. And, Chuck, I grew up right outside of St. Louis. Now I live in Las Vegas and East Hampton, NY--6 months in each place. Just curious if anyone of my fellow bloggers are nearby????

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  18. Hugh - I love to explore my Wilder side. Some say Litton's role was innaccurate. Although she followed the director's instructions, her clothing did not fit the era. Boy, was shea sore!

    Mario, get out of bed and eat some legumes!

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  19. RoRo, do you mean a bowl of peas, or a pole of bees?

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  20. I'm also sad that Liane is leaving, even though I'm not a long-time listener. I would love to take a break from work and go live along the seashore, sipping smoothies.

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  21. No clue here, but it's wondrous how sometimes the answer comes to you after a fitful night of sleeping.

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  22. Part of the answer is related to last week's on-air puzzle.

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  23. "Alas, poor Winston Smith! I knew him, Horatio - a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy."

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  24. Blaine: My nephew's spoonerism answer has
    no "phonetic" problem.

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  25. After all these years of doing puzzles (I was the guest last Labor Day Sunday) what a treat to find this site. Thanks Blaine.
    No hints here (seems to be plenty already anyway)
    I too have sent in a few puzzles to Will but have yet to hear any of them used.
    I do continue to play and am wondering if they will allow a repeater? I started in the days of the postcards only.

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  26. Thank geri. I figured out the intended answer not too long after my original post. I think my subconcious had the answer before I did. I'll give my alternate answer out later today. Apart from the slight phonetic problem, it meets the rest of the criteria.

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  27. My hint was "swell" puzzle and "hake"-sack (add HAKE to SWELL and you get SHAKE WELL.

    Blake:
    If you had a different answer, I'm guessing your "Swell Foop" was an unintentional spoonerism reference ?

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  28. Yes DaveJ, "Swell" ended up being an obvious clue to the real answer. I did hold off on sumbitting until I figured out the intended answer, but for awhile I was thinking it was a flawed puzzle with an answer of PULL HERE --> HULL + PIER.

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  29. my clues included going to a funeral (wake) by a friend pumping gas (Shell). No humans were actually injured during the making of this clue.

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  30. I got the same answer, shake and well. A lot of clues referred to either funeral wakes or waking up.

    I received the first installment of my NPR loot today. It took two weeks from the day that I got the first call from NPR, which was Thursday. I got the lapel pin and CD of past Sunday Puzzles, but the lapel pin was broken.

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  31. the entire referencing to Shaken Baby Syndrome = obvious

    tintinnabulum = a tiny, high – pitched bell – type toy, shaken by wee ones; a rattle

    Shiva eye = a genre of beach shell

    ashes’ committal = an areligious ceremony for the dead; a wake

    aftermath = the subsequent wake of one’s action; the ruins left behind after a crime

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  32. My hint: Big Joe Turner had a hit with "Shake, Rattle, & Roll." BTW, I found the answer on the first jar I looked at, which was salsa.

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  33. Dave, hang in there with waiting for the prizes. Took a couple of months before all the loot was delivered...then I went back and listened to the show because the things coming didn't quite seem correct...and they weren't, but close. Since it was just a few books that were jumbled I figured it didn't matter. Still fun to play on that great scrabble board. My old one was at least 30 years old!

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  34. Wilde's "Dorian Gray" was a rakehell. The syllables rhyme with the answer's words, but apparently the word itself isn't considered to rhyme with anything.

    I wonder if "something that might be seen at a regatta" would have earned a deletion.

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  35. My clue was changing a famous quote from a Shakespeare play. "Alas, poor Winston Smith! I knew him, Horatio - a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy."

    Winston Smith refers to the protagonist in 1984 by George Or"WELL"
    and of course William "SHAKES"peare

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  36. Well, Bellydancers do shake well. My reference to legumes were more like peanut shells. I was so tempted to go musical with that song "shake me, wake me when it's over" but knew that would have been tossed out.

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  37. Next week's puzzle is already posted. I could only find four names to match. First names are Adrian, Andy, Chris and Odalis.

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  38. I'm collecting names... I must have ten or more at this point.

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