Thursday, October 07, 2010

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Oct 3, 2010): Third Time's a Charm

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Oct 3, 2010): Third Time's a Charm:
Q: Name a famous person whose first name has six letters and last name has eight. In this person's first name, the first two letters are the same as the last two letters. And, these two letters also start the last name. The first two letters of the last name are pronounced differently from how they're pronounced in the first name. Who is this person?
Just so we are on the same page, united in thought so to speak, the pair of letters keeps the same order each time it is used.

Edit: I tried to include some misdirection (page=Author, thought=Philosopher, speak=Orator/Actor/Politician). The only real clue was united (as in United Airlines), which has used Rhapsody in Blue for years in its commercials.
A: GEorGE GErshwin

41 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any outright spoilers before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here. Thank you.

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  2. Actually, the famous person used a stage name but the real last name still fits the puzzle parameters but has 10 letters in the last name (If I'm on the right track).

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  3. Well, not really a stage name but changed by the father.

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  4. The father made the initial change, but with an alternate spelling.

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  5. Tommy Boy must REALLY have a crystal ball!
    Amazing!

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  6. I started with lists of first names, and got two male names that meet the criteria, and three female. Interestingly, on of the names was on both lists :) Although I've only heard of one lass sporting that name....

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  7. And a brother who saves, by all accounts ?

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  8. Let's try a little brain food: You will get close to the answer if you think of kind of apple. Then take President Washington's birthday (a famous IQ question that no one in the current generation can answer, it seems), combine it with the number of states in USA plus a famous Three Dog Night song and Voila!!!!

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  9. Would I find any of this person's creations in the Kelley Blue Book?

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  10. Actually, the puzzle sounded rather difficult when I first heard it but has proven to be quite a bit easier in the solving of it.

    Chuck

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  11. He declared that Palau is not a country.
    He declared that NPR is a word.

    Has Will Shortz jumped the shark?

    At least this week's answer is really a famous person. I think!

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  12. I am glad Will accepted Rap Station.

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  13. I haven't posted a musical clue in a while. This summer, I was fortunate enough to visit Abbey Road studio and spend a night in Liverpool. So, I have the Beatles on my mind. The clue: "While My Guitar Gently Weeps."

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  14. I was able to solve the puzzle and figure out one of Blaine's clues. How about you?

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  15. Holy @#!*, William. In my profession, I wish I did.

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  16. Phil J, if you were looking for a a Ford make in France, you might.

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  17. Wow--good puzzle and it made me think and I am humming and singing now that I got it.

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  18. Tommy Boy,

    That's not what I had in mind, but it might work (if I understand what you're saying).

    BTW, upon further checking, I believe that I should have said Kelly Blue Book.

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  19. Banje - figuring out Blaine's clue took longer than solving the puzzle!

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  20. A certain deceased comedian should offer a great clue on this one, okay? That is if anyone needs a clue.

    -- Other Ben

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  21. O Kay Smarty pants, I get it now!

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  22. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  23. Joel--that is pretty obvious LOL

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  24. Hi, all. New puzzle up at tomspuzzlebreak.blogspot.com

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  25. Joel,

    Too great a giveaway. That's not how we play it around here.

    -- Other Ben

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  26. My comment,"Was turned away by Nadia", contained two references to the answer. In the 1920s, Nadia Boulanger refused to accept Gershwin as a student (fearing that her academic approach would stifle his considerable natural talent). Of course, at the time, Gershwin was an American in Paris.

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  27. I can't believe I didn't get this one.... granted, I've been busy and haven't been able to spend more than 2 minutes on it.... but this is my favorite composer

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  28. My clue was going for the address of the George Gershin Theater---222(Washington's birthday) West 51st (# of states plus Three Dog Night hit song) Street in the Big Apple(kind of Apple). I don't know if anyone attempted to solve it by my clue, but that's what I was going for.

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  29. Crystal ball?
    How did Tommy Boy know to post this week's answer back on Monday September 27, almost a WEEK BEFORE THIS PUZZLE WAS GIVEN??
    How? How?

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  30. I agree with you, William. Tommy Boy's got some explaining to do.

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  31. My clue was Brother Ira (savings account) - pathetic I know - I've got a bucket of water here - would you like me to stick my head in it ? (sorry channeling Marvin..)

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  32. My response to Phil J's Kelly Blue Book comment, a Ford make in France, was an obvious reference to "An American in Paris."

    By the way, does anyone want to know when the world's going to end?

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  33. DaveJ, I actually enjoyed your clue. Cleverly worded.

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  34. "...how about a you?" = "I love a Gershwin tune..."

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  35. Jutchnbev, I almost deleted your clue based on the reference to Washington which I worried might be a spoiler for "George".

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  36. jutchnbev,

    In case you need a way to remember the year in which Washington was born, it was the square root of 3 (1.732)

    Tommy Boy,

    Yes, I got your answer, but that is not what I was going for.

    Gene Kelly (not Kelley, as in the auto book) starred in the film An American in Paris -- based on Gershwin's famous work of the same name.

    Blue, of course, referred to Rhapsody in Blue.

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  37. Blaine-
    I was led quickly toward the answer from the mentions of Washington and "While my guitar gently weeps" in quick succession.

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