Thursday, September 27, 2012

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Sep 23, 2012): Anatomy Book

Anatomy Book, Feltbug@flickrNPR Sunday Puzzle (Sep 23, 2012): Anatomy Book:
Q: Name two parts of the human body. Put them together one after the other. Change the 7th letter in the result to the next letter of the alphabet to name something that's often found in books. What is it?
If I add anything, I think I'll give it away (as it seems to happens in the comments too often) so I'm going to say nothing.

Edit: If I were to add anything, it might be in a footnote. the other hint was TOO OFTEN which anagrams to FOOTNOTE.
A: FOOT + NOSE --> FOOTNOTE

80 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via Google or Bing) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. I began hiking with my father when I was seven. I remember him frequently telling the same joke when we got tired.

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  3. AbqGuerrilla:
    Do you think Sandy Weisz, who came up with this dromedary of a puzzle, is Saudi Arabian?

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    1. No way she could be, SDB. A lame puzzle like this will drive us all to drink and we all know Saudi women don't drive. A real yawner. Even wife #2, who dropped out of school in the eighth grade, solved this in under 3 min. But for tormented fellow puzzle enthusiasts who may be struggling, I will provide my clues in a separate posting (just in case Blaine is feeling heavy handed this evening).

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    2. Well I don't need a lousy puzzle like this to have a drink, but it helps. I wonder if the NPR minions spelled her name incorrectly, or if it is some Ellis Island goof-up spelling. No such word in Deutsch to my knowledge. I think it should be Weiss, which would mean white sand. How do they spell White Sands in New Mejico? Have one of your wives look it up for me, if you please.

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    3. Arena blanca, compadre. Arena Blanca. Never met anyone named Weisz, but I did sip tequila one evening with a señorita named Arena Blanca (in Juarez) before I converted.

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    4. Where in Juarez were you? Try saying that out loud 3 times.

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    5. @skydiveboy: The name in German is spelled Weiss (more usually Weiß, except in Switzerland) where ß = ss. However, in Hungarian, the "ss" sound is rendered as sz (s alone in Hungarian is like "sh" in English) so that it could be that in Hungary it was Weisz. On top of that, the character ß in German is called "ess-tset" which is the same as the letter S and Z. An Ellis Island official may well have misunderstood the ancestor's name. An additional complication: said ancestor could have been a Yiddish speaker and used to using Hebrew characters, not Latin ones.

      However. I will not give away the answer to the puzzle by backing up these facts.
      Ken #2

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  4. Another rather pedestrian puzzle.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  5. I should like to make the observation that one of the body parts in question can also, at times, be found in a book. As for the other body part, I have a cousin who often boasts about having a heavy one. Although it sometimes impresses the ladies, more often than not, it gets him in trouble. My third wife, a former thespian, got tired of the light ones and left the profession. Heh, heh.

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    1. I'm a bit surprised you would marry a republican.

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    2. Actually, being married to someone with opposing political views, makes for some spirited feuding.

      And as a result we share at least one common viewpoint: Make-up sex---it's worth fighting for!

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    3. Do you both wear the make-up?

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    4. My dear (SkyDive) boy and fellow lover of the lexicon, allow me to relieve your memory lapse. The hyphenated word, make-up, denotes a compound modiffier meaning, "related to making peace or amends.". Had I been referring to sex with lipstick and mascara, I would have opted for the word "makeup", sans hyphen. While we're on the subject, shouldn't the phrase "anal retentive" be hyphenated?

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    5. I'll take your word for it and trust you did not make up that didactic retort.

      In answer to your last question, I would think it only necessary should other remedies fail.

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    6. I find it interesting that we would bring anal retentiveness into punctuation, as both can involve a colon.

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    7. Hey Curtis! If you don't mind, I'll handle the jokes on this blog, OK? :-) That being said, as the little girl mushroom said to the little boy mushroom, "Gee, you seem like a fun guy!"

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    8. I guess I'll let my sense of humor slip into a comma. Period.

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    9. Hey Curtis, no need to dash off on a sad parenthetical note, I was just funnin' ya, Bro.

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  6. Who knows? At least it's week 3 in the NFL!

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  7. Let's try to avoid the hostile tone of other weeks' comments, shall we?

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  8. When they write the book about Sunday challenges, this one is sure not going to get its own chapter!

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  9. I bid on every item at an art auction last night. Didn't end up winning anything though.

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  10. This week’s answer has something in common with a musical instrument I used to play.

    Chuck

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    1. This puzzle has something in common with the one from 4 weeks ago.

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    2. Chuck, are you stringing us along?

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  11. Rearrange the name of another body part that's also found in books to name two other things that are often found in books.

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    1. Would one of those two things be the abbreviation of this other body part?

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    2. How about a non-human body part often found in books.

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  12. Musical Clue: Falling in Love with Love

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  13. It would be really interesting to see someone trying to touch one of these body parts to the other.

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    1. Curtis,

      I am certain, with the appropriate amount of yoga exercise - it can be done.

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    2. I think you're right, Jim.

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    3. I know the person who can, due to an extremely serious accident years ago.

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    4. Lineman injury.

      When a reserve parachute fails you die. Choose a rigger you trust, and trust your rigger. I then trust you to fully know and practice emergency procedures.

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    5. Just kidding. Trying to imagine an accident that would juxtapose these body parts. Along the lines of, "What's the last thing to go through a bug's mind when he hits your windshield?" "His butt."

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    6. Ouch Jan! you made me laugh so hard it nearly ruptured my appendix!

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  14. Totally awesome puzzle. I presume there will be a whole bunch of musical clues.

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    1. I have several, but they are too revealing

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  15. Here's a musical clue: Little

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  16. At least one of the clues from two weeks ago came very close to nailing this one.

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  17. "Last half of the ninth inning....batter hits a hard one to deep right field....home run!"

    LMP

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    1. last half of the ninth (or any inning) is the BOTTOM of the inning where the FOOT is located

      DEEP right field--you breathe DEEP through your NOSE

      which leads to FOOT and NOSE and FOOTNOTE

      I thought of posting "this requires some deep thought which helped me get to the bottom of this" but I thought it might be too obvious.

      So will any of you be Will's on-air contestent this coming Sunday?

      LMP

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  18. Seriously these puzzles are not funny. They are plain dumb and why waste your time trying to think about making a puzzle like that?

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  19. The Sunday puzzle is a supposedly fun thing I'll never do again.

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    1. A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again is the re-named essay and collection of essays by the late David Foster Wallace [1]. May he rest in peace.

      1. Who was well-known for his use of footnotes as part of his writing style.

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  20. Lame lame, lame. This was the dumbest one yet. Surely one of you Mensans on this blog could come up with something better.

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    1. I have posted several times that I have made up and submitted numerous intelligent word puzzles to Will and have never heard anything back from him. He seems to like stupid vs. smart.

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  21. Here's a variation on this week's puzzle. Think of two body parts. Drop the last syllable of the second body part and combine what's left with the first body part without rearranging any letters to name a contemporary urban subculture.

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    1. I'll amend that to say "name a member of a contemporary urban subculture."

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  22. I bid a couple hundred on a pretty sweet velvet dogs playing poker, but somebody outbid me and I didn't want to go any higher. If you're not sure what I'm referring to, please see my earlier post above.

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    1. Velvet wall hangings and Velveeta Cheese! Talk about sofistikashun! :)

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    2. I had a Scottish Terrier that I taught to play poker several years ago. He was fairly adept at it, too. The only problem was that every time he got a good hand he started wagging his tail...

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    3. I think he may have been a skittish terrier.

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    4. Actually, now that I think about it, my dog was not a Scottish Terrier OR a skittish terrier. He was a British Harrier that loved to hunt rabbits. Roscoe was as big as a horse, so once a year, I had to pack him into our Amish carrier (he hated cars) and take him to Heber City's Yiddish farrier for new shoes. And that's the god's (small g) honest truth. Kinda.

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    5. I think you just needed a Terrier Harrier barrier for your life to be merrier. I had a problem with one of my scarier wives once that proved difficult, so I decided to bury her. I wish I'd thought of that before I decided to marry her. Now I'm warier.

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    6. Geez, SkyDiveBoy, very good! You totally pulled that one out of yer derriere!

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    7. I suppose you can ass scribe it to me.

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    8. Yes, indeed, SDB. I had big plans for some killer comeback puns, but you totally wrecked 'um with yer keen wit.

      On an aside, am I the only blogger here that has noticed the fact that matching the little encrypted letters and numbers in order to publish one's comments is far more difficult and time-consuming than solving any of Will's puzzles. I'm just sayin'...

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    9. Well then perhaps a :oscopy is in order. You don't want to wait too long and end up with a ;.

      As to your puzzle question: Well spoken! I fully concur with you.

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  23. It's a beautiful day. What do you say we take in a puzzle?

    This way people

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  24. FOOT & NOSE to FOOTNOTE

    My hint:

    "I began hiking with my father when I was seven. I remember him frequently telling the same joke when we got tired."

    His joke was a one-liner: "My feet are smelling and my nose is running."

    Speaking of nasty odors. This puzzle is a real stinker!

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  25. Last Sunday I said, “This week’s answer has something in common with a musical instrument I used to play.” The organ. You play the bass notes with your feet, i.e., foot notes. Of course I won’t mention that a nose is also an organ :)

    Chuck

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  26. > Let's try to avoid the hostile TONE OF OTher weeks' comments, shall we?

    anagrams to FOOTNOTE

    > This puzzle has something in common with the one from 4 weeks ago.

    Pinocchio's NOSE would grow a FOOT or so.

    > Rearrange the name of another body part that's also found in books to name two other things that are often found in books.

    APPENDIX -> INDEX and PAP

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  27. I posted on Sun Sep 23, at 05:25:00 AM PDT:

    Reminds me of a Morse Code palindrome.

    There are other palindromes besides the usual letters type. (One of my favorites from Weird Al's song "Bob": "Go hang a salami; I'm a lasagna hog!")

    In his book "Inversions", Scott Kim describes another type of palindrome - phonetic palindromes - words or phrases which are not the same letter-wise when reversed, but if spoken and recorded, and then the result played backwards, sounds the same. He gives two examples: "We revere you" and "Ominus Cinema". I've thought of instructing a Scotsman, a German, and an American to each answer in the affirmative: "Say 'Aye', 'Ja', 'Yes'."

    Anyway, there is a third type of palindrome: a word or phrase whose Morse Code representation reverses onto itself. Examples are the word "suds" (S ...)(U ..-)(D -...)(S ...), the word "waiting" (W .--)(A .-)(I ..)(T -)(I ..)(N -.)(G --.), and my favorite, the phrase "rebel fever" (R .-.)(E .)(B -...)(E .)(L .-..)   (F ..-.)(E .)(V ...-)(E .)(R .-.)

    Anyway, if you look it up in the Rec.Puzzles archive, the longest known single-word Morse Code palindrome is the word "footstool" (F ..-.)(O ---)(O ---)(T -)(S ...)(T -)(O ---)(O ---)(L .-..)

    Ok, I agree. A long, complicated explanation just to get to the hint "foot"!

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  28. Musical Clue: Falling in Love with Love was performed by Bernadette Peters in the television movie Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella, which of course included a glass slipper, hence foot.

    Real Men of Genius was a serious of popular advertisements for Anheuser-Busch a couple of years back. One was entitled Mr. Nose-Bleed Section Ticket Holder Guy.

    http://youtu.be/RQjash3vZuU

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  29. The new puzzle just now came up!

    -- "Crash"

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  30. One could say that a big car is, in a sense, the opposite of a small car. However they are both, in fact, cars. This just goes to show that sometimes opposites can be, in a sense, somewhat the same.

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  31. I have an answeer that works, but I'm not sure it is the one expected.

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  32. I believe that the correct answer is indubitable.

    Now if I could just persuade Google to let me publish this comment....

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