Thursday, May 16, 2013

NPR Sunday Puzzle (May 12, 2013): On a Scale of One to Ten...

NPR Sunday Puzzle (May 12, 2013): On a Scale of One to Ten...:
Definition of AttractiveQ: Name a famous American man, first and last names. Change the first letter of his first name from T to H. The result will sound like a term for an attractive person. Who is it?
He is a very colorful character, isn't he...

Edit: He received flak for broadcasting colorized versions of classic movies on his network.
A: Ted Turner --> "Head Turner"

120 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via Google or Bing) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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    1. Re: your graphic, Blaine >>> You winsome, you losesome.

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  3. This famous man shares a last name with a famous musician, two popular singers, two well-known actresses, and an activist hero from the pages of US history. In a recent ironic twist, the ex-wife of the famous man began to play him on a popular new TV series.

    And last, but not least, if he had married a female singer from the 40s-50s, her hyphenated last name would be an expression used to describe a good book.

    Speaking of good books, I am reading one about anti-gravity. I can't put it down...
    GuerrillaBoy
    The Unheralded Early Responder

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  4. After you change the "T" to an "H", you also get the name of Jeffrey Dahmer's oversized kitchen utensil...

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  5. Not a fan of the man but kind of fond of his wife

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    1. Nor am I Dave, but you have to admit that although many of his films did not win awards, they are still considered by the critics to be classics...

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  6. Will could have also said, "The resulting word can be used to describe a dentist, barber or photographer."

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    Replies
    1. ... or the ferris wheel or carousel boss.

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    2. or Linda Blair in her horror flick debut?

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  7. I posted the following at the end of last week's blog:

    I got it right away, jan. I took a logical approach to solve it by just thinking about it.

    I guess you could say I found this one to be smooth sailing.

    I can think of so many great clues, but they all are too revealing. However, the answer may come to you while you are cooking breakfast this morning, if you actually do that. Now I am again going back to bed while you are thinking about your kitchen.

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  8. It seems a shame one person on this blog gives the answer away each week. The same person every time and it has already happened again this week. There really is not much to be gained by taking the time to come up with obscure hints when this person will give them away anyway.

    Happy Mother's Day!

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  9. As I said at the end of last week's blog:

    Bravo to the early solvers. Our usual networking with one other should help others get the answer.

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    1. Especially those in the mountain states. Beautiful day for Mothers' Day. What a great turnout yesterday at the Botanic Gardens Plant Sale! Heirloom plants for moms and dads both.

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  10. You have to get on line to solve this one. Is this really news?

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  11. SDB Don't b discouraged. It is not always the same person each week because when u don't have a clue, clues don't always reveal what u think they might. So now, instead of wracking my brain or trying to wrap my brain around the problem for a few more days, I can really appreciate the blogs of you early responders and the subtle twists (sp?) therein

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    1. Happy Mother's Day, RoRo!
      Subtle indeed. ;-). Speaking of mothers, this American guy received an honorary B.A. (rather than the customary Ph.D.) from his alma mater.

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    2. Lorenzo, I knew that you knew that I knew that.

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    3. Or, in this case, no knews is not good knews.

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    4. You two have certainly turned into a couple of knew-it-alls.

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    5. Meanwhile, I'm still looking for more of subtle RoRo's "sinkholes of logic that have meaning only for the writer." I've found 4 or 5 so far, but expect a fuller understanding in due time.

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  13. This one is easier than last week's rerun.

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  14. But the first letter of his first name is R, not T.

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  15. Not too tough, today.

    Change the first letter of the first name to a different letter and the first letter of the last name to that same letter to describe the infamous Ms. Hughes.

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  16. This famous American man eventually married a famous American woman.

    Chuck

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    Replies
    1. Got it now! I remember his ex, then pregnant bumping into me with her purse at an anti-Viet Nam event.

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  17. "Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch" she said (or tried to.)

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  18. Blaine:
    I love your clue! It is not often I get your hints either.

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  19. Hi Folks! It's me Al Gori frequent visitor to Blaines and submitter of todays puzzle. Hope you enjoy.

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    1. Nice puzzle, Al. Keep up the good work.

      Chuck

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    2. Welcome, A|!

      Why the "|" in your user name? (if that's not too personal ;-)

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    3. That was really clever, Al. Did you see one of the Blainophiles gave a hint of "Bed burner"(?), which was also funny.

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  20. Hey Al ~ Give us a break. We're trying to move forward and solve this puzzle. But your showing up out of nowhere with a self-introduction has created a lot of rubbernecking here on the misinformation highway (the place where obscure, nearly meaningless clues lead people down dark dead-end alleys peppered with sinkholes of logic that have meaning only for the writer).

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  21. A quickie! Usually the puzzle takes up a chunk of my Sunday, but now I have no excuse not to pop in an exercise video and work off some of last night's yummy buffalo burger.

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    1. What was your answer to last weeks puzzle re: crony as an anagrams of Maria Callas?
      Thanks

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    2. Sounded so good I went out to bison.

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    3. Cookieface, if you anagram "mariacallas" you come up with "camarillas," the plural for what Merriam-Webster defines as "a group of unofficial often secret and scheming advisers." I don't know about you, but my cronies are basically scheming advisers to me, and vice versa.

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    4. Maybe they schemed away the extra 'a.'...And if they liked yellow they could be the camarillas amarillas. ;-)

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    5. WW, you hit the nail on the head. My scheming cronies often drop letters just to confus me.

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    6. yup A is definitely missing and that is what threw me..I saw the word camarillas but naturally thought it couldn't be if a letter was missing.

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  22. I saw a radiant woman on the T the other day and thought, "Wow, what a Hhomas Edison!"

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    1. Brilliant, jsulbyrne. I was stuck on Todd E. to Hottie for a bit.

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    2. If I were into dudes and had been struck by the male equivalent, he'd have been a Hruman Capote.

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  23. I think this week's puzzle has a Mother's 5ay connection. The nickname for this man's name is something that my kids purchased for their Mom today!

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    1. I thought Rachel might find it particularly meaningful. [Expecting to be chastened for this.]

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  24. Change the first letter of his first name to M, and change the first letter of his last name to L, and you will phonetically describe a pharmacology student.

    Change the first letter of his first name to D, and drop the first letter of his last name entirely, and you will phonetically describe Elizabeth Taylor, Michael Jackson, Elvis Presley, Charles Schulz...

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    1. Welcome back, Peter! Did you finally dig out of the snow thay was still falling on the Cities May 3rd?

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    2. ...Elvis Presley, Charles Schulz and Grandma Perkins whose Social Security checks still come to our house every month on the 28th...

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    3. WW: Question the remaining sanity of anyone who made it through this winter in Minnesota. We're still expecting frost tonight, even though the high temp for Tuesday should be near 90.

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    4. My daughter says there is still ice on ponds to the north of the Cities! She said she now understands the 4 seasons in MN: almost winter, winter, still winter and next winter. ;-)

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    5. Not sure if we are brave souls or just foolish for living up here but I'm afraid to put away the snow shovel.

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    6. I hear ya, loop. To everything there is a season...but this winter/spring is rediculous! Are you also in MN? Big news there yesterday. Oh, and tell us about your picture. . .

      My snow shovel is still out.How about you, Curtis?

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    7. The picture is just me trying to fit in with the future family. I've looked through all the pictures of me and there isn't a serious one in the lot.

      Being in Duluth, the lake has a big impact on the weather (never know what to expect.) And certainly big news out of Minnesota, a new brewery opens this weekend.

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    8. I enjoyed going through Duluth on my way to swimming in Lake Superior. Two Harbors was lovely. And I found several Lake Superior agates.

      Brewery. Hmmm, anything else? Maybe Peter knows.

      Btw, rediculous was another clue to the famous guy.

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    9. Actually, WW, my shovel is retired for the season. I've mowed twice, and I've set up my mad-science tomato and pepper garden where I do super-secret things to make sure the plants pollinate [insert evil laugh here].

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    10. Sounds like fun. Does it involve Walls 'O' Water, just in case?

      There was one period where I shoveled & mowed the same week. So I am leaving the shovel out til the end of May!

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    11. One ton tomato;
      I need a one ton tomato.
      I need a one ton tomato....
      To make a two acre pizza.


      Sorry....that was not Cole Porter's least favorite song.

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    12. Change the first letter of BOTHthe first and last names to the SAME letter, and you will describe a character from true life who was portrayed by Farrah Fawcett.

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  25. This guy is often given credit for creating something that was actually first created by Julius Wilbrand many, many years earlier...

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  26. I posted a comment/hint at the end of last week's blog. I won't bother repeating it unless I can determine if it is one of those "sinkholes of logic that have meaning only for the writer" or one which "gives the answer away." I would prefer that it be the former.

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    1. Bob, I think it was the latter, er ladder, that you provided out of a sinkhole of logic.

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    2. It is too bad anyone would think logic is part of a sinkhole. Logic is how I solved this puzzle. Our hints/clues are not supposed to be in any way helpful to those who have not yet solved the puzzle for that week, but to prove you have actually solved it when, after the deadline you may explain your hint. What is so difficult for anyone to understand this, since Blaine posts it each and every week? For me, the challenge most weeks is not in solving the puzzle, but in providing a clever and obscure clue. Any fool can provide an obvious hint after he has solved a puzzle.

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    3. 1) SDB said, "Our hints/clues are not supposed to be in any way helpful to those who have not yet solved the puzzle for that week." I was unable to find this anywhere in Blaine's instructions.

      2) If the object of this blog is not to drop clues that help others solve it on their own, then why are we here? To taunt others with useless clues that serve no purpose but to demonstrate the puzzle-solving abilities or computer expertise of some smarty pants with control issues?

      3) And finally, even though I do not always agree with his decisions, I think Blaine does a very good job of weeding out the "obvious hints" posted by "fools." You obviously feel differently. Guess you should take that up with Blaine or start your own blog so you can make and enforce the rules.



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    4. I guess you think this song is about you. Well if the glove fits...

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    5. As RoRo pointed out, some clues only seem like dead giveaways...mostly to those who already have the solution and are obsessed with remaining among the elite upper ├ęchelon of early puzzle solvers. Fortunately, Blaine knows an actual giveaway when he reads one. But speaking of TRULY REAL dead giveaways, I expect everyone has seen this by now...

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZcRU0Op5P4

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    6. I followed the link and opted for the desongified version. Go figure.
      Is there a clue here?

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    7. Unsongified version...
      Dammit! I'll never get this right!

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    8. The songified version is recommended, Paul. And yes, there is indeed a clue here. Although this guy is not particularly attractive (to me at least), I can see where he could easily elicit the same response as the attractive folks Will describes.

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    9. I meant, is there a clue in my May 13, 01:22:00 PM PDT comment? But, perhaps, this song is not about what I mean.

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    10. Paul, would you like to be chastened for that comment ;-) ? (I have no idea what the Rachel reference is elsewhere so can't chasten you for that).

      AbqG, I would say this puzzle answer American man is attractive but not stunningly attractive.

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    11. Paul: The link I posted to the songified autotune video was in reference to recent allegations about certain bloggers posting alleged giveaway clues. Was not directed toward you.

      Word Woman: I was not talking about this week's mystery man being unattractive, I was referring to the guy in the video link I posted.

      Sorry for the confusion.

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    12. And WHO said I expected U to chasten me for that?

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    13. Just teasing, Paul. ;-)

      A little tension on the blog this week. . .

      I come here to have fun, to read word plays, exchange clever ripostes, and most of all, to learn something new. I think we all realize the prize is not necessarily playing on air with Will but some camaraderie as we flock (school) together.

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    14. I can deal with that. What the hell's a 'riposte'?

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    15. A quick and clever reply, sir. And, as I learned in fencing class, a quick return thrust to a parry.

      Feel free to riposte or repost or both. ;-)

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    16. did you take fencing at Smith? I found it was good exercise but my opponent was taller than I and had a mask with a ridge on it so I was often intimidated by that. It was difficult to be Courageous, especially so early in the morning. My mom was the only woman in a fencing club until my Great Aunt found out and colored her world blue by making her quit.

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    17. RoRo, I did. I also fenced here in CO. Glad you were able to take a class...& bummer about your mom. Your mom being made to quit is similar to the experience of our puzzle dude (both with his major and with the authorities).

      By the way, they call them concentrators not majors now. And freshmen are first years. I wonder if an epee is still an epee ;-).

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  27. This puzzle could easily buffalo a person. Don't get steered in the wrong direction.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. Speaking of racing: remenber the great Trevor Engine?

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  28. The subject of this puzzle is, ironically, UN-attractive. Not so his ex-wife.

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    1. To Leo above and LMP below: just put it on my bill.

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  29. He decided that one of his enterprises was strictly for the birds!

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    1. He used to own the NBA's Atlanta HAWKS--whose post season record IS "strictly for the birds"

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  30. "A movie without a good script is like chicken without rosemary and thyme." - Werner Herzog.

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    1. Well said, loop, er, make that, Werner. And may I add that a day without sunshine is like...night?

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    2. Musical clue - Color Me Badd

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  31. Say the first and last names of his most recent ex-wife, then say his first and last names, and you have a slang phonetic expression that describes her during their marriage, although it makes more sense if you put apostrophe s after her first name.

    LMP

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    1. In Tarzanspeak "Jane Fonda Ted Turner", but more accurately "Jane's Fonda Ted Turner"

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  32. Ted Turner > Head turner

    My Hints:

    “I got it right away, jan. I took a logical approach to solve it by just thinking about it.”
    Or I used my HEAD to solve it.

    “I guess you could say I found this one to be smooth sailing.”
    Ted Turner captained Courageous to win the 1977 America's Cup.

    “I can think of so many great clues, but they all are too revealing. However, the answer may come to you while you are cooking breakfast this morning, if you actually do that. Now I am again going back to bed while you are thinking about your kitchen.”
    You might use a TURNER to cook that breakfast.

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  33. TED TURNER >>>> HEAD TURNER

    "Brave of you" referred to the Atlanta Braves, a Ted Turner enterprise.

    Mountain states referred to TT's ownership of Western states land, including the largest private piece of land in the US in NM. Birds feature prominently there and I alluded to that in LMP's comment. The bill comment also referred to the UN clue above it.

    "B.A. awarded" alluded to TT's expulsion from Brown and subsequent B.A. honorary degree.

    To every season Turn, Turn, Turn...

    Rediculous referred to the color red and TT's movie colorization.

    TT's dad was pretty harsh and told Ted he wanted to puke at his choice of Classics as a major. Brown kicked him out for a number of reasons. Brown and TT have reconciled; > $25 million donation probably helped TT's case.

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    1. I really liked the first head turner reference AbqG, liked your clue, Jan, but thought the Linda Blair clue was TMI, AbqG.

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  34. I posted on Thu May 16, at 02:06:00 AM PDT:

    Change the first letter of BOTH the first and last names to the SAME letter, and you will describe a character from true life who was portrayed by Farrah Fawcett.

    If you change the T's in Ted Turner to B's, you get Bed Burner. Farrah Fawcett starred in the made-for-TV movie "The Burning Bed".

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    Replies
    1. Tommy BoySun May 12, 08:56:00 AM PDT
      Not too tough, today.

      Change the first letter of the first name to a different letter and the first letter of the last name to that same letter to describe the infamous Ms. Hughes.

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  35. Turned into knew it alls - Turner
    last week's rerun puzzle - TBN's classics are reruns.
    Bison - buy some respinse to Cookie faces buffalo clue.
    Race car driver Trevor Engines, hrev your engines, they love to TURNer left.

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    1. So sorry Ruthie, the buffalo 'twas yorn.

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  36. > What's the best strategy for solving this puzzle?

    WTBS

    > I can not name one.

    CNN

    > Is he a musician? A ballplayer? An actor?

    Those are other Ted Turners, per Wikipedia.

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  37. My clue referred to a chance encounter with Jane Fonda on the early 70's.

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    1. Oh, got it. I thought the encounter had to do with that hand thing in the Barbarella movie.

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  38. Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch, the password given by Dildano to Barbarella.

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    1. Hugh, at first I thought you might be referring to Lake Chargoggagoggmanchauggagoggchaubunagungamaugg in Massachusetts.

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  39. Ted Turner, hed (head) turner

    Last Sunday I said, “This famous American man eventually married a famous American woman.” That would be Jane Fonda.

    Chuck

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  40. My clues:

    Bravo for braves
    Networking for turner network
    Mothers day gift was a "teddie"

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  41. So, Paul, not into sinkholes, huh? When I first started this blog, I was blamed for being too transparent. So now I have twisted (turned) 360 degrees it seems. 'Wrack' for rack that operates through turning. "Courageous" for the boat Ted sailed to win the cup and "color her world blue" for all the blues Ted got for colorizing those classic B&W movies. I forgot to name Chubby Checker for my musical clue but I was distracted by "dead give away".

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    1. RoRo,
      I've sunk into more holes than I care to think about.
      I thought "don't be discouraged" related to Home on the Range. I thought 'b' and 'u' related to Bucknell University, home of Bucky the Bison. {Bucky? Fuller? Get it? Never mind.}
      I even thought buu related to CNN and 911(early responder}.
      But 'twists' took some time to register; and 'wrack' completely eluded me.

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    2. Paul,
      Those "sink holes" make me seem deeper than I knew. I was thinking about Gallaudet's mascot, also Bison (don't know if it has a name, I will inquire) but did not figure out how to include. I know the Bucknell Orange and Blue song but was not acquainted with Bucky

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  42. New puzzle is up:

    Next week's challenge: From listener Jeffrey Harris of Chappaqua, N.Y. Name a category of books, in two words. Add one letter to each word — the same letter of the alphabet in each case. Rearrange the letters of the first word plus the added letter to make a new word. For the second word simply insert the new letter somewhere inside it. The result will be the two-word title of a famous movie, which is based on a book, which is definitely not found in the category of books you originally named. Name the category of books and the movie.

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  43. For the 5/19 challenge:

    I find that I lean toward a certain solving method - do the easy part first - and that gets the work done. And for those in the know, there is a pair of words in the saga of this challenge that Louis C K should appreciate!

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