Thursday, May 23, 2013

NPR Sunday Puzzle (May 19, 2013): Read the Book, Watched the Film

Books to FilmNPR Sunday Puzzle (May 19, 2013): Read the Book, Watched the Film:
Q: Name a category of books, in two words. Add one letter to each word — the same letter of the alphabet in each case. Rearrange the letters of the first word plus the added letter to make a new word. For the second word simply insert the new letter somewhere inside it. The result will be the two-word title of a famous movie, which is based on a book, which is definitely not found in the category of books you originally named. Name the category of books and the movie.
The initials of the director relate to the puzzle in a couple ways.

A: Children's Lit. --> Schindler's List

131 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Blaine, I like the new rules with the "chain of thought" (better than train of thought). If you miss a link you could end up in a whole new place.

      Delete
  2. Not sure y Jan's hint was del'd by the admin. Didn't help me find the cat or the title.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, still looking for the neighbor's cat. Don't know y, don't know x . . .

      Delete
    2. Henrietta is a cat. (Had to go back to Nova Scotia for that one.)

      Delete
    3. I looked at tons of lists trying to figure out the right book category. It wasn't till I was watching Jeopardy Tues. night and they had a category: "Urban Lit" that I got on the right track, and figured it out in about 30 seconds. I wanted to say that the more general part of the category was an abbreviation but couldn't get on here. Oh well, still too man¥ people for me to get picked. Covet that lapel pin.

      Delete
  3. Posted earlier on last week's blog:

    I find that I lean toward a certain solving method - do the easy part first - and that gets the work done. And for those in the know, there is a pair of words in the saga of this challenge that Louis C K should appreciate!

    ReplyDelete
  4. O, 'tis a sad day when the blog administrator rises up to smite down my clever clue before the new blog is posted!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alas! Jan, weeping for your clue ... and chain thinking.

      Delete
    2. I hadn't solved the puzzle before reading Jan's clue. It was clever, but led me directly to the answer and therefore had to be removed.

      Delete
    3. Blaine, you're not your average solver, you're a puzzle master. Erase my clue if you want, but I'd like to hear on Thursday how "directly" it led you to the answer.

      Delete
    4. Blaine:
      While I have lately been unhappy with how certain bloggers here have been giving away the answers, I have to agree with jan on this one. Even after I solved this puzzle it took me a long time and a lot of thinking to figure out his clue. I finally did figure it out, but I still don't see how it could possibly lead directly to the answer. I am impressed that you solved it this way.

      I don't envy you with your finger being the sole decider of when to press the nuclear button, but press on.

      Also, after solving the puzzle, I understood your hint again this week. I almost never get your hints, so two in a row for me is a surprise. I doubt many are going to solve the puzzle this week.

      Delete
    5. I'm guessing it's not "Pulp Fiction".

      Delete
    6. The truth is, in light of several of the entries permitted below,I think Blaine should do the righteous thing and restore jan's comment.

      Delete
    7. Wow Jan! You're a badass! Word Woman knows my gmail. I want to know you better.

      Delete
  5. Within a 15-minute span while shopping at a clothing store in LA one Saturday afternoon about eight years ago, I spotted an interesting collection of celebrities: Pat O'Brien from Access Hollywood, this film's director, and, ironically, an actress who was on hiatus from showbiz at the time. She has never worked with this director, but did earn her one Oscar nom the same year this film received its acclaim.

    ReplyDelete
  6. The titles of the book and film are similar but not identical.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Take a word that appears in the title of the book, but not the title of the movie.
      Take the letter you added to each word of the category. Add a letter to that letter to get a common English word.
      Rearrange the letters of these two words to get....well, you know what you get.

      Delete
    2. ARK + (S + O) -----> OSKAR***********duh

      Delete
  7. Haven't solved it yet, but is "Art War" a category of books?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. OK, got it. I have to admit spending more time in this section of the library than I have in decades.

      Delete
    2. If this is the correct answer, we are assuming "Art of War" is "Art War," and oh yes, another giveaway. Now what was Jan's clue? Was it worse than this?

      Delete
  8. I now have an answer that certainly fits the puzzle as posed, but I hope I'm not just kidding myself.

    ReplyDelete
  9. No clue here....I just want to say that this is one of the greatest puzzles and do not forget it.

    ReplyDelete
  10. ─┬─┬─┬─┬─┬─┬─┬─┬─┬─┬───┬─┬─┬─
    ═╪═╪═╪═╪═╪═╪═╪═╪═╪═╪═══╪═╪═╪═
    ─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼───┼─┼─┼───<── 1st ─ added.
    ─┴─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼───┼─┼─┼───
    ───┴─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼───┼─┼─┼───
    ─────┴─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼───┼─┼─┼───
    ───────┼─┼─┼─┼─┴─┼─┼───┼─┼─┼───
    ───────┼─┴─┼─┼───┼─┼───┼─┼─┼───
    ───────┴───┼─┼───┼─┼───┼─┼─┼───
    ───────────┼─┴───┼─┼───┼─┼─┼───
    ───────────┴─────┼─┼───┼─┼─┼───
    ─────────────────┴─┼───┼─┼─┼───
    ───────────────────┴───┼─┼─┼───
    ───────────────────────┼─┼─┼─
    ───────────────────────┴─┼─┼───
    ─────────────────────────┴─┼───
    ───────────────────────────┼───<── 2nd ─ added.
    ───────────────────────────┴───

    My posting this Thursday won't look quite as nice as the above, but it shouldn't look too bad.

    Note: Some might complain saying "Hey, one of those '┬' characters is a non-letter!", to which I say "Yes, but THE SAME NON-LETTER occurs in the catagory of books AND in the movie title, so I just thought I'd work with it."

    I myself have a complaint that one of the words in the catagory name is an abbreviated word. If you search for that abbreviated word on dictionary.com, what shows up is not that meaning! A totally unrelated meaning appears instead.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. But that totally unrelated meaning does pertain to the movie's beginning, as I reminded myself yesterday.

      Delete
    2. EWA- dictionary.com gives more than one definition.
      Go down the page to definition number 4 and you get
      the one you need. Even though I don't understand your
      line figures, your discussion of the "same non-letter" occurring in both the book category and the movie title immediately convinced me that I had the same answer as you do. I also agree with cookieface. This is a great puzzle.

      Delete
    3. You don't understand my line figures?

      They're made up of what are called "box characters". I like them a lot because even though we can't use a fixed-width font such as Courier or "Courier New" here, every box character still takes up exactly the same width as every other box character, so a visual representation of how one word or phrase anagrams into another can be shown! (sorta)

      You can select my diagram, copy it, and then open up a text editor, create a new document; then if your text editor is "Edit Pad" or "Edit Pad Lite", then you'll need to select "Convert", "Text Encoding", then select "Unicode, UTF-8"; - that step is unnecessary for "NotePad", and I don't know which of the other text editors also need that extra step; then PASTE it in and save it, and THEN you can PLAY WITH IT!!!

      On Thursday at the deadline, I'll repost the diagram, but with all "┬", "┴", and right-most "─" characters replaced with letters (and one non-letter).

      Delete
  11. This is a hard one to give hints for. On the one hand you don't want to be too cryptic, on the other hand, you don't want to sound too juvenile. I give up. I am going shopping.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Stopped thinking about it and I got it.

      RoRo, did you catch Arianna Huffington live streamed from our alma mater this morning? She did her homework, was funny and gracious, and had a terrific 24 minute message. She talked about sleep without putting the audience to sleep. You can catch it on youtube if you missed her.

      Gaudeamus igitur!

      Delete
    2. Thanks, I will look it up. Being out of school I hate to feel like I am missing something that could be beneficial education and fun-wise.

      Delete
    3. We're sending the kidz off to camp for the summer and I took the boys to the barber shop for crew cuts today. While I was there, I treated myself to a warm shave. And although it was a good close one, it was nowhere near as close a shave as some folks in that movie experienced...

      Delete
  12. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  13. MIDDLE PIECE is not a book category, but if you add an R to each word, you obtain the movie: MILDRED PIERCE, based on the book by the same name, for which Joan Crawford won an Oscar for best actress that year, 1945. SEE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mildred_Pierce_%28film%29

    Yes. I have solved this week's NPR Sunday Challenge.

    ron

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For a moment there I thought you were talking about peace on Middle Earth.
      So WW, after watching the Huffington presentation on sleep I wonder if I should read a good story or nestle in with a hot cup of coco?

      Delete
    2. Definitely read, RoRo. Perfect just before zzzzzzzzz's.

      Delete
  14. Replies
    1. Glad this was restored. Fairly benign clue!

      And I agree with restoring Jan's earlier clue also.

      Delete
  15. WOW! Ron, that's pretty amazing!

    ReplyDelete
  16. I got it by the hair of my chinny-chin-chin.

    Chuck

    ReplyDelete
  17. Stumped so far. Would you say "category" is the same as "genre?"

    ReplyDelete
  18. Okay, this one took a little longer than normal. My usual Modus Operandi for this type of puzzle is to go through the easier string of items first and use an online descrambler to find the second item. In this case, Book Categories seemed like the easier choice, since most publishers have their book categories on their website, and therefore I didn't have to come up with those on my own. After struggling with that, I chose to go the opposite direction and searched for movies with two word titles, which led me to the right answer, and showed me why my original method failed.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Curtisjohnsonimages (may I call you Curt?), you're okay. Will you pick me for your team?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'll pick you for my team if you don't call me Curt. I stopped using that name in high school because too many folks referred to me as Kirk or Kurt, and I could only take so many jokes about Star Trek, and I just don't care for the Kurt spelling.

      Delete
    2. Okay, I won't abbreviate but your reaction was a bit immature.

      Delete
    3. You say immature, I say young at heart. Oooh, I see a big, red dog outside. Maybe I'll go play.

      Delete
    4. See Curtis chase the big red dog. Play, Curtis, play.

      Delete
  20. Preparing for an airplane trip several years ago, I bought a book from one of the sale bins. When I got on the plane, I noticed a sticker on the book which read:
    BAR
    FIC
    so I very carefully removed it from the book, tore off a piece so it read:
    BAR
    FI
    and placed it on the air sickness bag. I wonder if anyone ever noticed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Several years ago, and you're still wondering? Seriously, David, get a life.
      No, David, not seriously!

      Delete
    2. David:
      I know for a fact that no one noticed because NPR had a segment on All Things Inconsiderate shortly after you did that. The point of the segment was that no one seemed to notice. Trust me on this one.

      Delete
  21. Curtis –

    I couldn’t get it either way you tried on Sunday. Couldn’t think of a promising book category. I also couldn’t solve it the way you did starting with two-word movies titles. A little program I wrote operating on the list of movies I use produced 239 two-word movie titles in which the first and second words shared at least one letter in common. Not a useful number to work with. I gave up sometime Sunday afternoon.

    This (Monday) morning while eating breakfast it just came to me in three quick little inspirations. First a possible category’s second word. Then a possible movie title’s second word. Then a possible first word of the movie title. Bingo! There it was – all laid out. How can a mind perform such feats?

    Chuck

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I, too, chewed on this puzzle for a while before coming up with a different book category with the same second word, which quickly led to the answer, through the same path you took.

      Delete
    2. Al, would that be Alfred E.? May not fit for some but worked for me

      Delete
  22. Replies
    1. The subject matter is definitely not mundanes to you.
      (just trying my hand at being vague)
      :-)

      Delete
  23. I have to escalate, or, at the very least improve my puzzle solving skill to hang with you guys. The long winter has diminished my smarts.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, we're usually a pretty friendly crowd to hang with. It's not like you're among goths here, or fashionistas, or such. Anyway, winter's over; it's springtime for puzzlers.

      Delete
    2. @ Loop,
      By all 'pearances you seems to have a good head on yer shoulders. Jest cozy up an have a good time. These folk top out the queue of puzzlers...specially dat Blaine guy.
      Zeke in awe of the brilliance

      Delete
    3. You are so kind and your words of encouragement are much appreciated. I can dance around the house to Irving Berlin's "Puttin on the Ritz" now with confidence.

      Delete
  24. Blaine,

    Just curious...can you see how many of us subscribe by e-mail and therefore can see the clues - such as Jan's - that you remove? It is kind of like cheating - no?

    I open this up to broader discussion.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. These cryptic references to Jan's now-deleted clue (which I never saw) have peaked my interest in reading it. I hope Jan re-posts after 3:00 Thursday. I know I should grow up and focus on meeting my responsibilities, but I'm too curious.

      Delete
    2. Jan's clue is the most talked about clue since I started blogging in Jan. A post trophy is definitely in order!

      Delete
    3. You're going to be disappointed in a little while when you see the post. It really wasn't worth all the attention.

      Delete
    4. I am sorely disappointed after reading Jan's deleted comment, because I don't understand why Blaine deleted it. Conversely, Curtis(etc)' clue walked me right through the steps to solve the puzzle.

      Delete
    5. I can't speak for Blaine in determining which clue crosses his line. I intended my post as a statement of what I considered obvious: when one approach doesn't work, take a different approach.

      Delete
  25. Finally got it. How did I not see this earlier?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Earlier is better but not a pre-requisite.

      My mother used to be into this category of books but my father, not as much

      Delete
    2. "not see" was my little contribution to the hints.

      Delete
    3. I did not see that, Aaron. Quite clever.

      We did see split pea DNA today. Long, white clumps impressed blue-, brown-, & hazel-eyed kindies.

      Delete
  26. Blaine, I am interested in Jim's comment. How does one subscribe to the blog by e-mail?

    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  27. Blaine,

    Nevermind!

    I see how to do it. Still a bit sleepy this morning!

    ReplyDelete
  28. Several actors from this movie have portrayed villains in three of recent history's most successful film franchises.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. CHILDREN'S LIT >>> SCHINDLER'S LIST

      1. Neighbor's cat >>> kittie >>> kiddie >>> kid lit>>>children's lit was my chain of thought. ;-)

      2. Arianna Huffington's Smith College speech about sleep alluded to reading a bedtime story.

      3. "Reading perfect just before bed"~~more bedtime stories. The zzzzzzzz's referred to the number of letters and ' in Schindler's.

      4. Cue the archangels alluded to "Schindler's Ark," the name of the book.

      5. "A post trophy is definitely in order" (written about Jan's infamous clue) referred to the apostrophes in both the movie title & the book category.

      Delete
    2. And

      6. Shoot, I forgot the "Weeping for your clue, Jan!" which referred to the Schindlers' move to Argentina after the war. Thanks for reminding me, Bob, and for the compliment!

      7. The numbered list was an homage to "Schindler's List," such an amazing film, which won the Oscar for best film, director (S.S.), and so many other categories. Hard to believe it received those awards in 1993!

      Delete
  29. Last Monday I said: “I got it by the hair of my chinny-chin-chin.” Refering to sCHINdler.

    Chuck

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And "The 3 Little Pigs," children's "literature?"

      The answer came when I realized lit had to be abbreviated but that the corresponding kid or kiddie had to be "lengthened" to children's. It is more customary to see kid or kiddie lit and children's literature. It reminds me a bit of our movie vs. film discussion.

      "3 Little Pigs" is lit to me. "Charlotte's Web" is literature.

      Delete
  30. Children’s Lit > Schlindler’s List

    My Hint:

    “I now have an answer that certainly fits the puzzle as posed, but I hope I'm not just kidding myself.”
    Would perusing the children’s section of a bookstore or library be kidding myself? I guess it depends on which of my relatives you were to ask.

    I thought this was a good puzzle.

    ReplyDelete
  31. ─C─h─i─l─d─r─e─n─'─s───L─i─t─
    ═╪═╪═╪═╪═╪═╪═╪═╪═╪═╪═══╪═╪═╪═
    ─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼───┼─┼─┼─S <add─1st─S.
    ─c─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼───┼─┼─┼─c
    ───h─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼───┼─┼─┼─h
    ─────i─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼─┼───┼─┼─┼─i
    ───────┼─┼─┼─┼─n─┼─┼───┼─┼─┼─n
    ───────┼─d─┼─┼───┼─┼───┼─┼─┼─d
    ───────l───┼─┼───┼─┼───┼─┼─┼─l
    ───────────┼─e───┼─┼───┼─┼─┼─e
    ───────────r─────┼─┼───┼─┼─┼─r
    ─────────────────'─┼───┼─┼─┼─'
    ───────────────────s───┼─┼─┼─s
    ───────────────────────┼─┼─┼─
    ───────────────────────L─┼─┼─L
    ─────────────────────────i─┼─i
    ───────────────────────────┼─s <add─2nd─s.
    ───────────────────────────t─t

    Children's Lit ==> Schindler's List

    ReplyDelete
  32. CHILDREN'S LIT + S + S -> SCHINDLER'S LIST

    My deleted comment was something like: "I think I'll be a grouch today and let someone else elevate this discussion."

    > O, 'TIS a sad day when the blog administrator RISES UP to smite DOWN my clever clue before the new blog is posted!

    Otis elevators are OK, but I prefer Schindler's lifts.

    > Blaine, you're not your average solver, you're a puzzle MASTER. ERASE my clue if you want, but I'd like to hear on Thursday how "directly" it led you to the answer.

    Master race?

    > This film win any awards?

    7 Oskars

    > I, too, CHEWED on this puzzle for a while before coming up with a different book category with the same second word, which quickly led to the answer, through the same path you took.

    Chiclets -> chick lit -> children's lit

    > Oh, we're usually a pretty friendly crowd to HANG with. It's not like you're AMONG GOTHS here,

    Amon Goth (sorry, I don't do umlauts) was the SS leader in the Krakow area. He hangs at the end of the film.

    > or FASHIONISTAS, or such.

    Fascists?

    > Anyway, winter's over; it's SPRINGTIME FOR PUZZLERS.

    Tip o' the hat to Mel Brooks.

    ReplyDelete
  33. My original comment:

    I find that I lean toward a certain solving method - do the easy part first - and that gets the work done. And for those in the know, there is a pair of words in the saga of this challenge that Louis C K should appreciate!

    to “lean” = to LIST

    “gets the work done” - in the film, Schindler protects his workers

    “a pair of words in the saga of this challenge that Louis C K should appreciate!” - because the OsCar goes to the film about OsKar.

    My second comment:

    The truth is, in light of several of the entries permitted below,I think Blaine should do the righteous thing and restore jan's comment.

    Overall - I had read Jan’s subsequently-deleted post, which I recall as simply saying Jan felt grouchy, a two-steps removed clue of Oscar the Grouch to Oskar Schindler, hardly a giveaway. But later the word Oscar appeared bare-facedly in at least two other posts, and was allowed to stand.

    Details: Playing on Word Woman’s comment, “Alas! Jan, weeping for your clue”, which I took to be a wonderfully subtle clue based on “Don’t cry for me Argentina,” from “Evita”, referring to the fact that Schindler lived in Argentina for ten years after the war, “the truth is” “I never left you” continues the line from the song.

    “do the righteous thing” - the Hebrew inscription on Schindler’s grave reads: "Righteous among the Nations."

    ReplyDelete
  34. Amon, you're such a d***ed f***in' child !

    ReplyDelete
  35. Given the book category of children's literature, I am curious to know, fellow bloggers, about your favorite children's books and your kids' favorites.

    I was a fan of Nancy Drew (more in the lit category in hindsight), "Charlotte's Web," and "A Little Princess" (not your typical princess story). My daughter, born the year "Schindler's List" won the Oscar, loved all the "Olivia" books as well as books by Maurice Sendak, Judy Blume, and Eric Carle.

    And you and yours?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I did my share of Hardy Boys, thank you very much; but the one I remember (pre- Hardy Boys) had to do with a little raindrop, up at home in a cloud with Momma Raindrop, and Poppa Raindrop, and sistren and brethren raindrops until the Storm Signal comes and everybody has to jump off the cloud, and everybody gets separated, and the little raindrop goes through various adventures and meets all kinds of interesting folk (I remember a leaf and a cow, sorry I can't do better); finally winds up in a river, and then an ocean.....and then evaporates....and, then, there are Momma, and Poppa, and sistren and brethren and uncles and aunts and well, you get the picture.

      Delete
    2. Paul, let me know if you remember the title, please. I am looking for books for my cousin's kids and that sounds like a great one.

      Delete
    3. I enjoyed reading any of the many novels by Kelly Ray Masters (1897–1987), also known by his pen name Zachary Ball.

      Delete
    4. While spinning through movie titles and book genres, I played around with "Star Wars" --> "Art War." But, after solving the puzzle correctly, I was bemused to think how much more time I'm spending looking at "children's lit" these days (with my four year old son). I'd love to have him fall as deeply in love with Narnia as I had, but I won't push him. We've been working on chapter books at bedtime: I found a pretty good abridged version of Pyle's King Arthur (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-story-of-king-arthur-and-his-knights-pyle-howard/1110762068?ean=9781402725340) that we're currently reading every night.

      Delete
    5. I remember my mother reading a book to me when I was probably four. She read it in chapters over several evenings after dinner. It was called, Tori Of The Magic Fingers, as I recall. Perhaps Tory. I cannot find it via searching online just now. It was a regular hard bound book. It was about a boy who lived in a pre-historic cave setting with his family and tribe. He broke a leg and would have to be put to death as he was a drag on the tribe and could not contribute, but then he began drawing on the walls of their cave and this saved his life. I suppose he was the forerunner of graffiti artists. I have no memory of her reading any other book to me, but I always read growing up and most of the books were adult. I also have a magic finger while driving.

      Delete
    6. I had a friend with three kids who decided that he didn't need to buy life insurance, because he'd read them all of the "Boxcar Children" books.

      Delete
    7. I just now suddenly noticed that no one has mentioned that obnoxious series of "books" chronicling the boring lives of a "typical" family with a spotted mutt.
      I am also enjoying he fact no one has mentioned that fairy tale they use in churches and hotel rooms.

      Delete
    8. John Quincy Adams was sworn in as U.S. President with a Book of Laws rather than The Bible because he wanted to maintain the separation of church and state.

      Kindergarteners gave me their favs today: Ish, David can Read, I am Six, Brown Bear, Brown Bear, The Biggest Bear, One, Pete the Cat, Those Darn Squirrels, and Smelly Socks. ;-)

      Delete
  36. One of the sweetest moments from my son's freshman year at college was when he called excited to tell us that he discovered his good friend's mother was the author of "The Prince of the Pond," a favorite of ours.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very sweet memory, Jan. It reminded me that my 24-year-old son still writes/answers "Goodnight Moon" whenever he is asked about his favorite book.

      Delete
    2. On the other hand, "Go the F*** to Sleep" resonates as well.

      Delete
    3. Some nights I should read that myself ;-).

      Delete
    4. With our children, we always liked reading the Oz books out load in the car during long trips. As a child, I liked The Tawny, Scrawny Lion.

      Delete
    5. "Make Way for Ducklings", "Blueberries for Sal", and other Robert McCloskey books were also favorites of ours. When we were in Boston for my son's wedding a couple of years ago, my wife and I took a walk in the Public Garden the morning before to tell Jack, Kack, Lack, and the rest of the Mallard family the news.

      Delete
    6. Yes, McCloskey's words and illustrations are on the list too, Jan. Especially MWFD.

      The Tawney, Scrawny Lion and other Little Golden Books are memorable, too, David. I enjoyed reading The Pokey Little Puppy, The Firetruck, and Five Little Firemen with my kids. The latter was written by Margaret Wise Brown of Goodnight Moon fame!

      All were so much better than Dick and Jane. I recall getting in trouble for trying to read ahead in class, hoping something would happen. It never did. With so much good literature around, I still wonder why we ever read D and J.



      Delete
    7. Totally with the McCloskey thing, my kids loved them! Me too!

      Delete
  37. Posted:
    @SDB It all comes back to RA.
    Followed by:
    Not mundanes...
    RA refers to R. Amundsen the great North Pole explorer held in high esteem of SDB. Mundanes is the anagram. Santa from children's lit abides at the North Pole, and he is keeping a list.

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    1. I never would have got it. I even woke up thinking of him this morning and was contemplating recommending Roland Huntford's great book, The Last Place On Earth to Francis Mayes.

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    2. This was a fun puzzle. I even grabbed a coffee at our local bookstore Monday night giving the puzzle a thought. Lying in bed it came to me. My wife was not as pleased as I was, but I shared anyway.
      Zeke the geek :-)

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  38. Ben Kingsley (The Mandarin in Iron Man 3), Ralph Fiennes (Voldemort in the Harry Potter series), and Liam Neeson (Ra's al Ghul in the Dark Knight trilogy) are the actors from my second post.

    The multi-celeb sighting I mentioned in my first post included Spielberg and Winona Ryder whose presence was ironic because she was then only a couple years removed from her shoplifting incident. She was nominated for Best Supporting Actress for The Age of Innocence the same year Schindler's List cleaned up at the Oscars.

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  39. "Art (of) War"
    "Star Wars"

    My sense of it is that Will is more simplistic. But who am I to say?

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    1. He could probably get blow away deep, but is more concerned with a product that a broad cut of society can enjoy.
      Zeke with just another take.

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  40. As a child, loved the Borrowers, Mary Poppins, Drs Seuss and Doolittle, Nancy Drew, Charlotte's Web,50 Famous Fairy Tales, National Velvet and (hs count since I started 9th grade at 12?) The Hobbit.
    As a teacher, Goodnight Moon, Judy Blume.

    My daughter loved Toad and Frog

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    1. RoRo, my daughter read every Jodi Picoult book in middle school. Jodi's middle-school-aged son would tell girls his mom was Jodi Picoult as an opening line to girls. ;-)

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    2. Ahead of her time. Also a "wonder" woman of sorts I presume.

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    3. J.P. & Annie Lamott are two of my current favorites. How about you?

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  41. Jan, I am not clear on what the Newman reference was but I was referring to the fact that I read an awful lot of Mad Magazines as a young'un which constitutes kiddie lit FOR ME

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  42. Someone's sleeping in at NPR today. 6:15 a.m. EDT, and still no puzzle. :-(

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  43. Next week's challenge: Think of a word starting with G. Change the G to a T, and rearrange the letters after the T. The result will be a new word with the same meaning as the original word. What words are these?

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  45. Whew, that's a weight off my shoulders. Now I can really enjoy this beautiful weekend. Have a great Memorial Day.

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  46. Yeah, big relief not to have to worry about the puzzle the rest of the week.

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  47. The answer words are out there!

    I'm sure a lot of people have the biggest hopes for their submissions. While my hopes are also among the biggest, I'm also thinking second biggest!

    Part of my answer...., let's just say it's a real gasser!!!!

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  48. In my part of the world it's great and tater. Think I'll score some breakfast.

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  49. I think I remember the answer.

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  50. Should be easy for an old jet-setter to solve. Especially since these are synonyms of a former puzzle answer.

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  51. Now I've solved it I think I'll go in the kitchen and sling some hash.

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  53. Amused by some near-misses this week:

    GLIDE and TILDE seem phonologically similar.

    In some operas, the TENOR is a GONER.

    If you're a good THINKER, you're less likely to find yourself in a pickle (GHERKIN).

    Imagining Ronald Reagan with Al Gore's wife gives us GIPPER and TIPPER.

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  54. But, no rearranging GIPPER to TIPPER, quite the unusual pair!

    Have any good puzzles for the week?

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