Thursday, May 30, 2013

NPR Sunday Puzzle (May 26, 2013): G is for..., T is for...:
G is for..., T is for... Q: Think of a word starting with G. Change the G to a T, and rearrange the letters after the T. The result will be a new word with the same meaning as the original word. What words are these?
S.S. last week, J.C. this week.

Steven Spielberg was the director mentioned last week. James Cameron directed Titanic.
A: GIANT --> TITAN

197 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Blaine,
    I finally got one of your clues but I think GS would be a better fit than JC.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. SS would do just fine this week also, tho at one more remove. (OK, it's a different SS.)

      Delete
  3. Should be easy for an old jet-setter to solve. Especially since these are synonyms of a former puzzle answer.

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  4. Replies
    1. I don't believe we've heard from you before, Lebowski. I guess this week's puzzle is just right for you.

      Delete
    2. Yeah, my law school dean said it was tailor-made for me.

      Delete
  5. This week's NPR Sunday Puzzle Challenge is easy! Solving the challenge is not a TEAM GAME, but an individual endeavor. Here are a few more word pairs that fit the conditions of this week's challenge, but are NOT synonyms: GATHER/THREAT, GENUS/TUNES, GESTURE/TRUSTEE. I hope these spur you on to the correct solution. Yes. I have solved it.

    ron

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  6. Personally, I didn’t think this week’s puzzle was that big a deal. After all, last week’s puzzle only received 350 correct answers.

    Chuck

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  7. Near the end of our last puzzle I posted this hint:

    Now I've solved it I think I'll go in the kitchen and sling some hash.

    ReplyDelete
  8. My British friend who is visiting said this puzzle is jolly and he is envious of our weekly radio puzzles.

    ReplyDelete
  9. With a lot of support from posts above, I finally got it! Reminds me of a wedding outfit by that guy [self-censored].

    ReplyDelete
  10. I started to post a brilliant clue, but as I was typing, I could already sense the butt cheeks of one of our more outspoken bloggers begin to tighten. "Colossal giveaway!" he would have surely alleged.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That giveaway should be roadkill about now.

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    2. No worries. Several give-away posts already preceded yours long ago this morning.

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    3. SDB, Wonder if your British chap knows Laura Massaro who just won the Squash British Open today. She is hoping to go on to the Olympics in 2020 if squash makes the cut on Wednesday.

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    4. ;-) You say bikini, she says zucchini.

      She is the first Brit to win the tourney in 22 years. She bested Nicol David of Malaysia.

      Delete
  11. A single legume could eventually lead to the answer. It worked for Joaquin. Unfortunately, probably not by this Thursday.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Charge nuts soup muff...

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    2. Great idea, Jan. And that works for the most part. But here in Provo, muff is a cash-only commodity.

      Delete
  12. As I said before in last week's blog, "Whew, that is a weight off my shoulders. Now I can enjoy the weekend. Have a wonderful Memorial Day, everybody."
    Zeke and the thankful.

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  13. Not a clue, just a science joke:

    A guy walks into a bar and orders H2O. A second guy says " I'll have H2O too."

    The second guy dies (or gets really sick).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ox? You referring to AbqGuerrilla's legumes?

      Anyway, I heard that Johnny was a chemist's son, but Johnny is no more, for what he thought was H2O was H2SO4.

      Delete
    2. Is that a veiled reference to relief pitcher, Johnny Ox that was just axed from the Kansas City Royals? How timely, in that yesterday he was traded to San Francisco for catcher, Joe Jacobs, in exchange for a few bucks and future consideration. A small fee for a guy who graduated Phi Beta Kappa and has proved himself to be a formidable foe.

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    3. Naw, AbqGuerrilla, I'm not that clever.

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    4. A real scholar, ABQ. WW, your guy had, per chance, a dram too much of the wrong drink. I will go to sleep now per chance to Drambuie (sp). BTW, since I was 12 years old in 9th grade (last week) does "How Green was My Valley" count for kiddie lit?

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    5. obviously I meant last week's question since I wan not in 9th grade last week. I am not that gifted a scholar. Also obvious from my blogs. LOL

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    6. I got it, RoRo. Too bad it rained cats and dogs for Reunion II. Indeed, it did make everything pretty darn green though! I saw photos.

      Curious about where you belly dance. I took a class here a few springs ago. It was really fun and relaxing.

      Delete
  14. I'm reminded of someone who was the most recognizable person in his line of work for many years. His professional name included one of the words and the name of the company for which he worked included the other word.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And these words together are the name of a remarkable group of companies, people, what have you. Reminds me of a condo called "Vista View."

      Delete
  15. I'm keeping an eye on these clues.

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  16. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was going to post my answer, but I didn't want to break the law.

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  17. Just syllables not Osyllables, pardon my Irish!

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    Replies
    1. Phonetic or actual spelling?

      Delete
    2. Sorry, Snipper, rewind: Find the name of a famous person in two syllables. Move the letters of the first syllable behind the second (WITH rearranging) to get the name of a body part. It is the actual spelling.

      Who is the person, what is the body part?

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    3. So that's last name in two syllables, body part also in two syllables.

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    4. So, now that you changed/clarified the puzzle, I assume the answer isn't MURPHY - FEMUR ?

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    5. John Brown, you assume correctly. ;-)

      I am an inchoate puzzle deliverer who needs to vet her clue delivery! Will gets credit for stating the puzzles correctly most of the time.

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    6. A shame I can't think of a famous person with a last name of BOWEL or ELBOW...

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    7. Keep trying, Mr. Brown...and maybe cleverly hint at the answers a la Mr. Science's comment on the blog's rifeness.

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    8. Funny, your BOWEL & ELBOW answer, JB, reminded me not only of Pat Bowlen and John Elway, but also of Tim Tebow.

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    9. Referring to ABQ's post, I assume it is not one of the infamous Kbutchee brothers.

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    10. Could it be Sonny LISTON & TONSIL ?

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    11. It could be. And, it is. Sorry, no lapel pin, Ron, just satisfaction. ;-)

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    12. ron,
      nice work. you knocked that on outta the ring!

      WW,
      Forget about John Elway and Tim Tebow. What about Eli Manning and Jake Locker or, better yet, Kerry Collins?

      Lego…

      Delete
    13. We are more into Peyton around here, Lego. You are into quarterbacks. Add seven more to get to 10, I see. I shouldn't encourage it. Before long, we'll know every detail of every Bronco at training camp.

      Btw, couldn't find a body part named Ningnam. Maybe dance a little gangnam instead. ;-)

      Delete
    14. WW,

      Actually, my quarterback comment was intended as a clue to this week’s puzzle. I’ve been loathe to offer up clues lest Blaine or bloggers with concerns about the integrity of the site deem my clues overly obvious. I agree with skydiveboy that there is an art to subtle cluing. It’s a valid subject for bloggy debate: where to draw that fine line between making fellow solvers scratch their heads, or hitting them over the head with the answer. Too much head-hitting will result in Will receiving 2,000-plus correct entries per week and, alas, that prized yet elusive lapel pin will remain a pipe dream for most of us!

      Anyway, I had hoped that, in the context of your fine Liston/Tonsil challenge, my QB cluing was sufficiently subtle.

      Lego…

      Delete
    15. Lego (or should I call you LOL?), If you read my response above very carefully you will see that I knew what you knew...and that you were referring to the NPR puzzle. Maybe I buried it a tad too deep.

      It is a valid concern. In my opinion, it is always more fun to have a subtle aha! moment, rather than an A H A!!! moment hit you over the head.

      Thanks for the kudos on LISTON/TONSIL. I did wonder if maybe Will had used it before and it was deeply buried in my brain.

      Delete
    16. Well, if you ain't sure, just adenoid.

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    17. I don't have to add one SBD; I'm already annoyed. ;-)

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    18. Untied we strand. Yew knighted we autumn.

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    19. Lego, Just read this: Three levels of pain ~~ pain, excruciating pain, and stepping on a Lego.

      Delete
    20. Did I glass for your opinion? Now my train/chain of thought is broken. . .JK. I was wondering about all those male bugs out on a picnic today.

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    21. No, they were all male~~sircadian rhythm.

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    22. Reminds me of watching Al Gore dance. He does it mathematically. Algorithm.

      Delete
    23. WW,

      Sorry I missed the deeper meaning of your reply. I guess I could use a little "hitting over the head" myself. Otherwise much such clever rapid-fire blogger banter (as among you, SDB, AbqG, et al)simply flies over my head like crossfire over a foxhole.

      Speaking of things flying over my head, the Gadsden flag displays an advisory motto espoused by all Legos like me. If folks would only heed that advice, their soles would be much less pained. In a Lego landmine angels (and even the most callous of souls, such as Maria at LaScala)fear to tread.

      Lego... marching out sheepishly

      Delete
    24. Hi Lego,
      Huh. Well, I could have sworn vexiologists were a few folks on this blog vexing each other. Now, having learned this proper flag terminology, I can fully appreciate your DTOM clue.

      Kudos on pulling in references to previous puzzles, too. Some may say blogged down; I say blog up!

      Delete
  18. My clue from near the end of last week's thread:

    I posted on Sun May 26, at 06:24:00 AM PDT:

    The answer words are out there!

    I'm sure a lot of people have the biggest hopes for their submissions. While my hopes are also among the biggest, I'm also thinking second biggest!

    Part of my answer...., let's just say it's a real gasser!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  19. I've been gone for a while, but now I've come back to find the blog rife (rife, I say) with lame clues that give the answer away to anybody who can walk and spit at the same time.

    C'mon folks, a little more thought before posting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gosh, that's a good way to get a hernia, Mr. Science.

      Delete
    2. I had a Hermia, but I traded it for two Lysanders and a Thisbe.

      Delete
    3. Mr. Science,
      Being that my ability to target my salivation source is not worth a hill of beans I would have the dubious title of Miss Hit no Miss

      Delete
    4. When a walkin n a spittin tis gud to bein gentle wit da stickin.
      Zeke a hangin wit da geniuses.

      Delete
    5. Ach und alas,
      Ich mus eine zwei-futen rhymer gemachen ....

      "Bist auch eine grossen leaker
      In der hintgemacher bei Herr Zeker"

      No offense, my friend, but your Sunday 11:03 clue surrenders Dorothy.
      _________
      D/Dt of DL/DQk dot minus DL/Dqk is nothing.

      Delete
    6. At long last! I also learned it was likely urban legend that most German folks thought JFK was saying he was a jelly doughnut. They knew he was saying he was standing with the Berliners and was one of them that day. Ich bin Blainesviller!

      Delete
    7. "I'll get you my pretty, and your little dog...too."
      To the briiliant it is all dead giveaway.

      Delete
    8. Please, mister, don't shoot me with your Captain Video atomic ray blaster, constructed of sturdy plastic and guaranteed to last forever, if left in crate.

      I'm too old to die.

      Delete
  20. Move one letter from the first word to the second word and shake lightly to get an insect and an artist.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great clue that doesn't give too much away!

      Delete
    2. A six letter artist (which I have) and a 6 letter insect (which I don't)?

      Remove 1 of 10 letters of the two words combined and anagram to 9 letter word.

      Delete
    3. Jan, are you overlooking the musician?

      Delete
    4. There's also a word that is formed from the anagram of all letters of both words, David. Maybe telling the number of letters is TMI?

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    5. Risking giveaway status can we assume it to be an even number?
      Ole Zeke, have mercy on my playful nature.

      Delete
    6. Ha, ha, Ole Zeke. It really must be since even + even = even, and odd + odd = even. But, I suspect you are just funnin' with me. Yer days are, indeed, numbered ;-).

      Delete
    7. One more in duh books, sissie. dat's odd aint it? :-)

      Delete
    8. Speaking of bugs (Jan was, originally): "The difference between the right word and the almost right word is really a large matter-'tis the difference between the lightning bug and the lightning." ~~Mark Twain~~

      Surprised no one mentioned Towel Day on Saturday. I did not panic, kept calm, and learned that Douglas Adams was once described as "unnecessarily tall."

      Delete
  21. I find it inconceivable that so many blatant clues appear this week...

    ReplyDelete
  22. Replies
    1. Yes, Charles. I will finally go to sleep now and dream of the "Manly Men" who starred in those movies.

      Remind me not to blog in the middle of the night after belly dancing and performing all day. Good nite!

      Delete
    2. 3:30 a.m., RoRo! And belly dancing by the light of the moon! Where the Wild Things Are.

      Delete
  23. I ain't tainting this puzzle answer.

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  24. The only clues that make sense to me refer to movie titles; otherwise, too cryptic

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  25. There is also another word beginning with G that means the same as the puzzle answers, change one G to a T and remove another G and rearrange to get a fourth word that means the same as the other three (also a movie)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Actually, one of the (oh-so-many) hints given above had led me to just this pair of words. Then I looked and said, no that doesn't work, but a few seconds later I saw the desired answer.

      Delete
  26. A 2nd answer, but probably not preferred.

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  27. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  28. On a side note: There is a certain cartoon character from popular TV and mag ads of the 60's and 70's that several bloggers have alluded to as a clue for this week's puzzle.

    During Reagan's debacle, the New Yorker featured a poignant cartoon that featured this caricature pissing on farm workers who were on their knees picking crops. The caption read, "Trickle-down Economics."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The iceberg lettuce boycott, which ironically was not directly related, I think, was quite a few years earlier.

      Delete
    2. Yo Jan ~ Our family has been boycotting iceberg lettuce for decades...I confess it is more so out of epicurian snobbery than supporting farm workers. Iceberg is technically lettuce in the same way that Olive Garden is technically Italian food. I'm jus' sayin'...

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    3. Iceberg lettuce boycott comes to a head? I'm with you, AbqG, on the "taste" of iceberg lettuce.

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    4. I can never forgive iceberg lettuce for sinking the Titanic. (I hope I got that right?)

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    5. Getting a little obvious, aren't we?

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    6. Points of no return, shall we say?

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    7. The iceberg has flipped. 8/9 is now above sea level.

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    8. 1/9 > 1/10. Even I know that's a bad tip, and I don't get out much.

      Delete
    9. To SDB: Iceberg sinking the Titanic? Maybe you should lettuce handle the jokes, SkyDiveBoy.

      Delete
    10. What escarole should we play, AbqGuerrilla?

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    11. Now, AbqGerrilla, that really would be a joke! But don't plan on a Romaine Holiday just yet.

      Delete
    12. Nearer, my God, to thee,
      Nearer to thee;
      E'en tho' it be a cross
      That lifteth me.
      This, all my prayer shall be,
      Nearer, my God, to thee.
      Nearer to Thee.....etc.

      Delete
    13. Don't go getting radish, Word Woman. As for me, well I'm heading off on a vacation to the Thousand Islands. Can't beet that!

      Delete
    14. We're all rooting for you, sdb.

      Delete
    15. Are you just mesclun with me, SkyDiveBoy? And are you arugula-ble enough to think it's all for the butter mint of us bloggers?

      Delete
    16. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    17. Are you blowing your tuber again Paul?

      And, Word Woman, cauliflower if you must, but don't petal your radicchio nonsense here.

      Delete
    18. From one human bean to another: (heard it through the grape vine) this puzzle is pretty seedy and downright dirty.

      Delete
    19. There you grow, stalking non-scents again.

      Delete
    20. Like I said, you should leaf the jokes to us, EndiveBoy.

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    21. Kale, kale, the gang's all here!

      Too shay, AbqG. Gotta like EnDive.

      Delete
    22. We keep waiting GourdArugulaBoy. Amuse us.

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    23. Lettuce romaine silent and squash these obvious clues.

      Peas out.

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    24. Ok, Ra.

      Speaking of squash, the Olympic Committee decides tomorrow whether squash remains on the final list for 2020!

      Delete
    25. I guess you took the bait and arroz to the occasion.

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    26. Euell take any path to the wild asparagus, snap peas, or snap dragons.

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    27. I do believe that fellow is one of my home state (we both still live here) and I'm certain he would find this line of banter quite suited for the gutter.

      Delete
  29. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  30. I've read all the posts here and it makes me sad that the apparent need to engage in snappy repartee has completely crushed the occasional gentle clue.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Agreed, Ruth. And some of that snappy repartee gives away the answer.

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    2. If only the repartee were a bit snappier, we could get some closure...

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    3. I think we saw some snap pea repartee above just a little while ago.

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    4. I bury clues and you dig them up, sir!

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    5. This whole line of vegetable banter leaves me cold.

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    6. Keep Jicama. Nothing wrong with acting irradishonal, afterall Romaine was not concord in a date.
      And the hairsparagus kept singing "the world keeps spinaching round onion and my heartichoke keeps thyme to the speed of sound...I was lost til I heard the drums and I found my whey...you can't stop the beet"

      Delete
    7. Don't be chive'n me wid yur corny talk. I'll be halv'n nun uv it as I'm plum tard of it. I say I never met a rutabaga I fig your.

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    8. I bagel yur garden but avocado be me

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    9. I vinaigrette my remarks and offer my appleogies with chard-green as I didn't mean to be arugula.

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    10. no need to be skirret. I shallot daikons be daikons and not chard you for rootness. We are all human beans

      Delete
    11. Kale, kale the galangal ear! Now lettuce endive this caper and not be sorrel.

      Delete
  31. A not-so-gentle clue:
    Either of these words would make a terrific brand name for trash bags, pickup trucks or condoms.
    Snapford "Snappy" Repartay

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    Replies
    1. Hefty, hefty cinch condoms~~ doesn't sound too good, AbqGuerrilla.

      Delete
    2. One of the words already is a brand name for at least one of those three products.

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    3. An old story.

      http://slog.thestranger.com/2007/01/rubber_wars



      Delete
    4. The story about big government condom purchases reminds me of the time in grad school I had to shepherd a purchase order for sheepskin condoms through the NY state university system.

      Delete
    5. No dogs involved. Leeches (not leashes). I stuck microelectrodes into their neurons, looking at connections. Trouble is, you occasionally need to feed them. And even for a 3-credit A, it's hard to get undergrads to volunteer. Getting out-of-date blood from the local hospital was no problem, but you can't just pour it in a dish and expect the leeches to lap it up. They need to bite through skin. So balloons are out, but well-rinsed sheepskin condoms worked fine. But try telling that to Albany bureaucrats.

      Delete
    6. I could say "Ewe!" but I think it is fascinating.

      Delete
    7. Didn't realize I was setting off such a suggestive and racy thread. But since we're dwelling on the subject, I'd like to share the fact that I've been using the new super-sensitive variety.
      Once the show is over (for me), I can go watch the playoffs while this fantastic product sticks around to cuddle and chit chat with my partner in my stead.
      GuerrillaBoy "The Big Kidder"

      PS Wasn't Michael Douglas amazing as Liberace?
      Academy Awards probably won't even mention him. I was expecting a rotten tomato <<<insert blinking code here with apologies to SDB) but it was as good as any performance by Kirk. Better, me thinks.

      Delete
    8. Ewe! to your first paragraph.

      Haven't seen the film. . .

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    9. I met Liberace here in Seattle in 1970. He was wearing a buckskin jacket that must have cost a small fortune. He was performing several evenings at the opera house and after one of those he happened to come into a bar I was in. I recognized him and said hello and he asked if he could join me for a drink. What the hell. I was never a fan of his, but I found him polite and more down to earth than when he was performing.

      Delete
    10. The Nissan Titan is a pick-up truck.

      Delete
  32. I got this rather quickly. How long have you jolly gents been stalking this answer?

    ReplyDelete
  33. @ Ruthie.
    I'm not one of those who live in a glass house, so I acquired a taste for heavy handedness.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    2. So, Mr. Valley, please to meet you. What's your favorite color? Size? Mood?

      In any case, thanks for moving us off the veggie thread. You don't need an eagle's or falcon's or some other bird's eye to see that it was leading us nowhere.

      Delete
    3. Jan, don't cha mean dinosaur's eye? ;-) I know, I know what you're up to.

      Mr. Valley, how about you with the deep last name?

      Delete
    4. This must've been one great worm catcher, 'cause it was the earliest bird of all (so far): http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature12168.html

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    5. Interesting stuff, especially about bird flight either evolving twice or having been subsequently lost and modified in some Deinonyichsauria. Thanks for the link, Jan.

      Delete
  35. TV, your clue leads one down a chain of thought but doesn't hit us over the head with a synonym or obvious thread (so glad no one has used the 'C' word). Kudos, Mr. Valley.

    ReplyDelete
  36. ───┬───┬───┬───┬───┬───
    ═══╪═══╪═══╪═══╪═══╪════
    ───┴───┼───┼───┼───┼────<──Change───to──
    ───────┴───┼───┼───┼────
    ───────────┼───┼───┴────
    ───────────┴───┼────────
    ───────────────┴────────

    I was concerned about posting this clue because of its small size, but it should be OK with only mere hours left before the deadline.

    Anyway, as in past threads, my post at noon today PDT won't look quite as good as what I've posted above, but it shouldn't look too bad.

    ReplyDelete
  37. Here's a silly answer: GALOOT...TOTAL 0

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. @ ward
      at least total 0 isn't negative :-)

      Delete
  38. Say Hey! Being selected to play Puzzle on the air with Will will be the Shot Heard 'Round the World. - LMP

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The "Say Hey" kid was the legendary GIANTS outfielder Willie Mays. Bobby Thompson's game winning home run that won the 1951 NL pennant for the GIANTS was the Shot Heard Round the World.

      LMP

      Delete
  39. giant, titan

    Last Sunday I said, “I didn’t think this puzzle was that big a deal.” Big as in giant :)

    Chuck

    ReplyDelete
  40. GIANT > TITAN

    My Hints:

    “Now I've solved it I think I'll go in the kitchen and sling some hash.”
    David used a slingshot to kill the giant.

    “My British friend who is visiting said this puzzle is jolly and he is envious of our weekly radio puzzles.”
    Jolly (Jolly Green Giant) envious (Green with envy.)
    “I can never forgive iceberg lettuce for sinking the Titanic. (I hope I got that right?)”
    The Titanic was a big boat. Icebergs are somewhat larger than ice cubes.

    ReplyDelete
  41. I hope the Jolly Green Giant has been ap.peas.ed and we can proceed with no one throwing any more pun.kins.

    “Reminds me of a wedding outfit by that guy [self-censored].” Where [self-censored] is Oleg Cassini, wedding gown designer, whose last name reminds us of “Giovanni Domenico Cassini, (also known later as Jean-Dominique Cassini when he became a citizen of France),” astronomer whose name is part of the name of the Cassini–Huygens Flagship-class NASA-ESA-ASI robotic spacecraft which was sent to Titan and other moons of Saturn. (I was afraid “Cassini” would be too much of a giveaway.)

    “SS would do just fine this week also, tho at one more remove. (OK, it's a different SS.)” -- Because Stephen Sondheim wrote the music and lyrics of “Into the Woods,” a Broadway show which features a Giant.

    And yes, I had also thought of GIGANTIC and TITANIC before attempting the transformation and seeing it didn’t quite work, and then saw the right answer.

    ReplyDelete
  42. GIANT >>> TITAN

    "I, um, got it" referred to TitanIum.

    ReplyDelete
  43. > I don't believe we've heard from you before, Lebowski. I guess this week's puzzle is just right for you.

    I.e., big.

    >> A single legume could eventually lead to the answer. It worked for Joaquin.

    > Charge nuts soup muff...

    Fee, Fie, Pho, Fumble.

    > Move one letter from the first word to the second word and shake lightly to get an insect and an artist.

    Gnat, Titian. There's a good limerick about the latter.

    >>> I find it inconceivable that so many blatant clues appear this week...

    >> I don't.

    > Think.

    ... it means what you think it does. (The Princess Bride)

    >> The iceberg lettuce boycott, which ironically was not directly related, I think, was quite a few years earlier.

    > I can never forgive iceberg lettuce for sinking the Titanic.

    I'm surprised that one got by the Blog Administrator. But that's what I was getting at.

    > This whole line of vegetable banter leaves me cold.

    As in frozen veggies.

    >> NY and TN.

    > So, Mr. Valley, please to meet you. What's your favorite color? Size? Mood?

    Ho, ho, ho.

    > You don't need an eagle's or falcon's

    Other NFL teams.

    > or some other bird's eye

    Clarence, who started it all.





    ReplyDelete
  44. Gentle giants...do they really exist?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not sure, Ruth. . .

      Also, "Add seven more to get to 10, I see." (Tennessee) referred to the TN Titans NFL team.

      Anagram both words to get attainting.

      Olympics referred to the Olympians who CLASHED with the Titans. Btw, squash made it to the top 3 sports for 2020! Wahoo!

      Just thought of a new one...Headed off to wear orange and violet (that would be another clash).

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  45. GIANT ==> TITAN

    ───G───I───A───N───T───
    ═══╪═══╪═══╪═══╪═══╪════
    ───G───┼───┼───┼───┼───T<──Change─G─to─T
    ───────I───┼───┼───┼───I
    ───────────┼───┼───T───T
    ───────────A───┼───────A
    ───────────────N───────N

    I posted on last week's thread on Sun May 26, at 06:24:00 AM PDT, and then again on this thread on Sun May 26, at 01:20:00 PM PDT:

    The answer words are out there!

    <...in the planets of our solar system and the moons which orbit them...>

    I'm sure a lot of people have the biggest hopes for their submissions. While my hopes are also among the biggest,...

    <...The biggest planets in our solar system: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune; are called "gas GIANTS"!...>

    ...I'm also thinking second biggest!

    Part of my answer...., let's just say it's a real gasser!!!!

    <...Among the moons of our solar system, the biggest is Jupiter's Ganymede, but the second biggest is Saturn's moon TITAN!

    It also happens to be the ONLY moon in our solar system known to have its own atmosphere, so "real gasser" applies to it as well as the gas giant planets.

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  46. The most recognizable pro wrestler of the 1970s and 1980s was arguably Andre the Giant. He spent most of his career working for the World Wrestling Federation whose parent company was known as Titan Sports, Inc. for much of that time.

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  47. My roadkill comment was referring to the colossal clue in the previous post. Hense the the Colossus of Rhodes.
    Weight off my shoulders should be a nonclue since the titan, Atlas, never really shouldered the weight.
    My hillbilly vernacular turned into bad German by the venerable MRSCI referred back to the band, Gentle Giant.
    "In a glass house " and "Acquired the taste" are two Gentle Giant albums.

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  48. "...banter quite suited for the gutter."

    the gutter = the sewer = Le Sueur (MN)

    And everybody knows that Le Sueur is the "Valley of the Jolly Green Giant"

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    1. I did not know this, Loop. Just read about the Jolly Green Giant sign in Le Sueur which apparently has "scared traveling motorists." Ho, ho, ho indeed.

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    2. Just those of us that didn't like our vegetables.

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    3. ;-)

      Santa Claus must have a lousy agent to let ho ho ho go.

      Wonder what Clarence Birdseye thought about it all all all.

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  49. My inconceivable clue was a reference to The Princess Bride, which featured Andre the Giant in a prominent role.

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  50. "Old jet-setter" referred to the old ny jets, who were previously the titans.

    Prior puzzle answer that was a synonym of giant and titan was "behemoth".

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  51. How green was my valley did refer to the jolly guy. My banter with ABQ had to do with the Rhodes Scholar, Colossus of Rhodes connection. Saw that movie in a drive-in as a kid. Really bad movie but I was so happy to be in a drive-in.

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  52. There's an 888-mile route between MetLife Stadium and LP Field. One with fewer tollgates would be more to my taste.
    At some point I abandoned all hope of finding an alternate solution.
    I'll admit I prefer romaine to iceberg.
    If I ever ate arugula I wasn't aware of it. Always makes me think of a Model T, for some reason.
    Endive made a bad first impression on me.
    My parents used to like dandelion in the spring. Some things, apparently, are not hereditary.
    I was not familiar with MrScience's equation and found it interesting. The leech story was also interesting.
    I would have bet anything E&WAf's "gasser" pointed to "beanstalk". Didn't Heinz run an ad campaign many years ago featuring a couple of "almost human" "spokesbeans"?

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  54. Looking forward to the rehash 'give away' sermon.

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