Friday, June 06, 2014

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jun 1, 2014): A Businessman's Lunch

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jun 1, 2014): A Businessman's Lunch:
Q: Take the name of a well-known American businessman — first and last names. Put the last name first. Insert an M between the two names. The result names a food item. What is it?
I had to look up the businessman's name (thought he was a grooming product) and also the food item. You better figure out the food item before it goes stale.

Edit: The hint was "stale" which is an anagram of Tesla.
A: Elon Musk --> Muskmelon

117 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  2. The first name of this businessman might remind you of a presidential candidate.

    ReplyDelete
  3. He has balls -- or, at least, one.

    ReplyDelete
  4. It might be appropriate were you to find this product at a silent auction.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I question whether this businessman is "well-known". His company has generated some press, but his name hasn't made waves.

    The food item - or at least its variants - is quite well-known. Now on to Sunday chores!!! Or maybe golf with Ben. No time for a trip to Vegas.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I wonder if they sell this at the campus bookstore?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. jan,
      If you are thinking of the campus I think you are, then you are much closer than you might think.

      Delete
    2. My search of their website came up empty.

      Delete
    3. If I had your email address I would send you a detailed explanation.

      Delete
    4. I would not call this person well-known – bright and successful yes – but not well-known. I searched through businessman lists – a stinky way to spend part of a beautiful spring day if you ask me – to no avail. Just about to give up when the answer came to me almost fully formed in a blaze of synaptic electrical energy.

      Chuck

      Delete
    5. Chuck,
      And to think you were about to Chuck it! :-)

      Delete
    6. jan,

      If the campus you mention is The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, you might be surprised to know there is a Tesla showroom just a short walk from their new campus, which is just across the street from the Space Needle. The showroom has been there for years though. I have no inside information as to whether this may have any contributed to the Gates’s decision to locate their campus there.

      From this link open the map and driving directions link and look all the way to the left side of the map in line with the Tesla store and you will see the campus.

      www.teslamotors.com/seattle

      Delete
  7. I found it easier to look through a list of foods, and work backwards by looking for words with m somewhere in the middle. Using that technique got me the answer much quicker than lists of businessmen. I'd say this is a marginally tough puzzle; while this person is famous he isn't a household name as are Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, and Warren Buffet. Even as such, the type of food is also marginally obscure; I'd say that most folks would more likely know several sub-types of the food.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I got the answer by thinking of the everyday product that came upon us rather quietly, I would say, and then looking up just who invented it.

      Delete
  8. I posted on Sun Jun 01, at 05:56:00 AM PDT on last week's thread:

    This is one of those puzzles which I think requires the internet. I had to look up the businessman on an internet list, and then when I saw what would turn out to be the answer, I had to enter it into Wikipedia to verify that yes, that’s a food item, all right. My submission to NPR actually includes the first sentence of the food item’s entry in Wikipedia.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Would the food item be morel mushroom toasts?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lorenzo, I would caution you not to associate with mushroom growers. I understand they tend to have loose morels.

      Delete
  10. Just another truth is stranger than fiction account.

    This has nothing to do with the puzzle, but I think some of you may enjoy it. I swear this is not a made up story, but actually happened today as I stopped by a yard sale, as I am wont to do.

    As I drove up I was the only prospect and there were five adults standing on the porch having a discussion. Close to the curb there was what appeared to be a tan leather chair and three matching ottomans. I was not in the market so did not inspect, but they seemed in good condition and I was surprised to see so many of the ottomans although there was a sign indicating another chair inside the house. As I walked up and their conversation stopped and one said hello, I said, "I just noticed your three ottomans. Are you trying to start an empire?" It took about two seconds before they got it and the laughter began. Made my day.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. SDB,

      You may have seen Felix Baumgartner's jump from 128,100 feet before, but you have never seen it like this. Any comments on this jump?

      http://www.flixxy.com/first-person-view-of-felix-baumgartners-space-jump.htm

      Delete
    2. ron,

      Thanks, I just watched it and will answer more after I eat mass quantities breakfast.

      Delete
    3. ron,

      I was not a dedicated follower of this jump story, but I was fully aware of it and I did watch the final hour and actual jump live. I did not know exactly what time it would happen, but was fortunate to check online and found it interesting as it was happening. I was not particularly concerned about him succeeding but I did wonder if he might experience a flat spin situation. This would not be caused by the high speed of the early parts of he freefall, but the "thin air" which lacks the density required to control the body. As the jump gets closer to Earth the speed slows down as the density increases and this makes it easier to control.

      When Kittinger made his jump long before at a much lower altitude (102,800 ft. AGL) he was not falling as fast and because he was not considered an experienced skydiver he used a drogue chute in order to keep him stable, and this slowed him down even more, which is why this newer and higher jump did not break the FF time record.

      I am one of the major pioneers of Tandem Skydiving and set and held the world record for the most Tandem skydives for many years. I have thousands of them. I mention this because I became the first Tandem Examiner and trained many experienced skydivers, who qualified, to become Tandem Instructors.

      Unexpectedly one day there was a very unusual Tandem fatality that was caught on video where the instructor and his student went into a violent flat spin right after exiting their aircraft. The instructor was unable to regain control and most likely passed out. This caused a major concern as you may imagine. I watched the video, and think I still have a copy. This flat spin situation was unknown up to this time.

      Delete
    4. Now it is important to understand that objects do not fall at the same rate, as many people seem to believe, but a Tandem pair will fall about fifty percent faster. This causes numerous problems, including shortened FF time; hard openings, which are very hard on the equipment and sometimes the jumpers; difficulty controlling the FF; and it feels much different. Because of this it soon became obvious that something had to be done in order to reduce the FF rate. This was accomplished by employing a drogue system. The drogue is to be released by the instructor as soon as the jumpers become stable after exit. These out of control flat spins were occurring before the drogue was employed. A few more cases became known. No one seemed to have a solution as to how to recover should it happen to us. I thought I had the solution while I watched the video I mentioned above.

      I will back up a moment to mention that I had once before had a somewhat similar situation on a Tandem jump I made with a very tall, young man. We exited and I deployed the drogue as soon as we were stable, but soon we began a violent flat spin and no matter what I did, I could not even slow it down. I could tell it was caused by the student's long legs being rigid and extending straight out, but I could not force them into the proper position or get him to cooperate with my verbal commands. I had no choice but to terminate the FF by deploying the main canopy. This was an unpleasant FF experience, but because I pulled early, it ended normally. It caused all kinds of discussion among the other Tandem instructors on the DZ at the time. Because no one else had had a similar experience they could not really understand it. Much later on when a few of these violent spins were happening and some caught on video it was accepted as a new phenomenon.

      The difference between my flat spin situation and that of the fatal one, and others that followed, is that I had already deployed the drogue. The other flat spins were pre-drogue deployment. Watching the video, along with my flat spin experience previously, it was clear to me that simply arching and other standard corrective measures would not resolve this situation. I thought the way to handle it successfully would be for the instructor who finds himself in this situation to immediately flip over into a back to earth position and then flip back face to earth and deploy the drogue. I believe this is how it became resolved, but thankfully I never experienced one of these pre-drogue flat spins, nor have I spoken with anyone who has.

      I am telling you all this because as I watched the Baumgartner jump and his flat spin I tried to see if he might try and flip over as I described above. I could not tell for sure, but I think that is what he did in order to recover stability. I was again watching for this in the link video you sent for me to watch. I again could not tell for sure, but think that is what he did. I would like to hear from him, or anyone else who knows for sure if this did happen.

      Delete
    5. Most informative. Thanks.

      Delete
    6. It seems late in the game to be discussing Baumgartner's jump, but I guess if you're a skydiver, delaying is how you make a lasting impression.

      Delete
    7. Yes, jan, that is why I wanted Maxwell House Coffee to sponsor me.

      Delete
    8. Have you had that last drop yet, sdb?

      Delete
    9. Think of a two-word expression for a problem a skydiver might face; four letters in each word. Replace the first letter of the first word with the first two letters of the second word to get a five-letter word for a possible consequence of that problem.

      Delete
    10. Paul, I hope I didn't leave you with the wrong impression. (Unintended pun.) This problem on a normal skydive is not the same as the problem I described above. But I like your puzzle anyway.

      Delete
  11. This guy's been busy. Certainly hasn't been draggin' his feet.

    Here's another clue:










    How was that?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jan, I assume your clue was whited out because it was x-rated.

      Delete
  12. When the mole sunk its teeth into the earthworm, it squealed with delight because it had just solved this week's challenge!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Need a hint. Can't spend too much time on this. Gotta mow the lawn, put up the screens and get the flower beds ready.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tommy! Good to see your smiling T-shirt again!
      Need a hint? Really? OK:

      Perkins

      Delete
    2. I don't think Tommy Boy needs a hint at all. He and ecoarchitect are on the same page.

      Delete
    3. Similar ways to skin that feline.

      Delete
    4. What feline? Did I miss something?

      Delete
    5. No, I think not...more on Thursday.

      Delete
    6. I was thinking not only of the honey do--honey dew connection, but also of honey deux (approx) since both jan and Tommyboy mentioned the chore lists.

      My cat would come running from all corners when I opened a canteloupe. My dog, on the other hand, is not a melon collie.

      Delete
    7. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
  14. I solved this puzzle rather quickly, but became embroiled in a family drama which delayed my blogging. My 16 year old niece and her boy friend were planning to run off and get married. Her Mom got wind of the idea, called me and together we met with my niece and with the boy friend. It took hours, but we finally convinced the kids that they weren't ready for marriage.

    Later it hit me that their conclusion and the answer to this puzzle are similar.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is a plausible anecdote - but I think we are being set up for the punchline.

      Delete
    2. Wow, Jim, do you think SuperZee would actually do that?

      Blaine's Blog: more set-ups than the volleyball court.

      Delete
    3. Same punchline as my comment at the end of last week's blog.

      Delete
    4. Let's face it, we eat this stuff up. The puzzles are fun, but the puns and word play add spice.

      Delete
  15. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I am dancing as fast as I can!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha, RoRo! See Saltation vs. Saltation in this week's PEOTS!

      Delete
  17. Replies
    1. Yogi BERRA....GM CEO (and fwllow automaker) Mary BARRA who is on the cover of Forbes magazine this week. Forbes featured a short piece on Elon Musk.

      What Elon Musk has in common with Forbes magazine and other business media outlets is that he has most likely been featured in all of them, and their moguls crossed my mind when trying to think of businessmen: Steve Forbes, Michael Bloomberg, Ted Turner, Rupert Murdoch, etc.

      Delete
  18. I honestly had never heard of this person until this puzzle. However, among the many sources of information that I encounter,. I saw the person's name and observed that the pattern of his name satisfied the puzzle's criteria. Then I realized that this person shared an amazing trait with the source where I found his name, and that the person shared this trait with ANOTHER similar source.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Proofread your submissions. To clarify: it's not the pattern of his name that they shared. There's something more basic that this person shared with these two sources of information. I'll stop there before I make any more gaffes or give too many clues away.

      Delete
  19. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  20. I have no doubt that many of you here, like me, have been wondering why whales never attend rock concerts or jazz festivals. Well, you will be pleased to know that NOAH is about to release the results of a major study they have been conducting (unintended pun) on this subject. It turns out whales prefer Orcastra

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can work on that joke til you're BLUE in the face; it won't make it RIGHT. (BTW, I think you mean NOAA; Noah worked on a different 40-day ocean study.) I think this ship is sinking; better start BALEEN.

      Delete
    2. jan,
      You are, of course, right. I have long known I should not post right after awakening. Not to carp on this, but I knew something was a bit fishy, and I corrected it, but did not notice I had confused the acronym with the captain's name. That's my spin, so aweigh with you.

      Delete
  21. ELON MUSK -> MUSKMELON

    > I'm sure that Dan Pitt has seen plenty of this businessman's products in Palo Alto.

    Lots of Teslas out there, but they can't be sold by the manufacturer in NJ because of laws protecting independent dealers. I did see one just the other day, though, with NJ plates: CURRENT.

    > I'd love to run off with a Weekend Edition lapel pin this week, but I doubt I'll be able to.

    No, I can't elope with the prize. (Cantaloupe is a muskmelon.)

    > He has balls -- or, at least, one.

    Elon anagrams to lone. Musk is from the Sanskrit for testicle (hence our word for the scent).

    > I wonder if they sell this at the campus bookstore?

    Elon Musk: The Official Fragrance of Elon University?

    > This guy's been busy. Certainly hasn't been draggin' his feet.

    Musk's SpaceX Corp makes the Dragon reusable spacecraft, which has been bringing cargo and may soon be ferrying crews to and from the International Space Station.

    > Here's another clue:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > How was that?

    That's 10 spaces, or SpaceX, maybe.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I misunderstood your ten spaces hint. I thought you were providing a silent hint, indicating the silence of the car. I wanted to post that I didn't see that one coming, but thought it might be too much of a giveaway.

      Delete
  22. ELON MUSK > MUSKMELON

    My hints:

    “The first name of this businessman might remind you of a presidential candidate.”
    Edmund Muskie


    “It might be appropriate were you to find this product at a silent auction.”
    His electric car, Tesla, is electric, therefore silent.

    ReplyDelete
  23. >>> MUSKMELON

    My cat, Chally's, favorite foods were muskmelon and canteloupe.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ELON MUSK >>>
      MUSKMELON


      Elon Musk was new to me, however.

      Delete
  24. Different wheelhouses and all that . . . found this one super-easy, which is rare for me.

    Hence my post at the end of last week's thread, five minutes after I heard the challenge, no references needed. In my usual straightforward way:

    "Can read all about it in the Chattanooga Times, or, in this time of global warming as some say, in the New York Times." Newspaperman Adolph Ochs was famously associated with both the Chattanooga and New York Timeses. "time of global warming as some say", must mean Al Gore. Whose Ochs is being Gored? => Whose ox is gored? With "ox", can only think of "musk ox", hence Elon Musk.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Elon Musk (CEO of Tesla Motors), muskmelon

    Last Sunday I said: “I would not call this person well-known – bright and successful yes – but not well-known. I searched through businessman lists – a stinky way to spend part of a beautiful spring day if you ask me – to no avail. Just about to give up when the answer came to me almost fully formed in a blaze of synaptic electrical energy.”

    Stinky as in Musk. Electrical as in Nikola Tesla.

    Chuck

    ReplyDelete
  26. My hint: I see we are all charged up!
    Refers to Tesla electrical car.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Now that we know the business man is Elon Musk and the food a musk melon, the punch line of my story involving a 16 year old niece and her plan to run off and get married, shouldn't require any explanation to the denizens of "Blaine's World."

    But just in case, we finally convinced them that they can't elope!

    Not to mention that when I got home my wife had a list of chores for me to do. Or as some call them, honey dos.

    ReplyDelete
  28. I so wanted to say your story was told with élan, SuperZee, but knew that would not pass musker, er, muster.

    Things post in unusual places sometimes. . .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Word Woman.
      Your volleyball comment certainly netted some laughs.

      Delete
    2. My pleasure, SuperZee. Often the set-up is more fun than the spike!



      Delete
  29. In the spirit of hot turkey sandwiches, I posted "morel mushroom toasts", with MOREL TOASTS being an anagram of TESLA MOTORS.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Whoever heard of Musk Melons? They're cantaloupes. I've never seen a sign at any grocery store or farmers market or anywhere else that said Musk Melons or Muskmelons or even Mushmelons. I object! Also, I question whether Elon Musk is well-known. My spell check even tried to change his name to Elton. Weak puzzle, but other than that, Mrs. Lincoln, I've had a good week.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I find I Musk agree with you.

      Delete
    2. Remember muskrat Susie and muskrat Sam?

      And, Mrs. Lincoln, how very cultivared of you ;-).

      Delete
    3. Btw, Ruth and sdb, we used to call the yellower, smoother-skinned fruit musk melons vs. the bumpier-skinned, tanner ones cantaloupes. Is that an East coast thing?

      In any case, glad to see you back using your melon ;-).

      Delete
    4. Really? You're going with the Captain and Tennille? While skydiveboy sings the praises (sorry) of opera? I'm glad this blog mostly sticks to puzzles!

      Delete
    5. Elon/Elton -- Rocket Man -- Makes perfect sense to me.

      Delete
    6. Skin may be bumpier but fruit remains the same. Like the song. It's a canteloupe. Like a debutante with strict parents.

      Delete
    7. Captain Elton and Ten Eels? Coming out in the aquatic operatic version soon ;-) [remember volleyball]

      Oh, gosh we're back to debutante (melon) balls then?

      Delete
    8. Paul may be onto something with his "Rocket Man" comment, seeing as there is a food connection there. Rocket = another name for radicchio. As for the Captain and Tenille, WW, you've completely undone my progress wiping their memory out of my head. I shudder at the thought. Now, time for my cantaloupe and coffee breakfast. Did you ever notice how certain combinations really hit the spot? Another one is honey-do melon and dry, well-toasted rye bread.

      Delete
    9. Ruth, I am hoping knowing rocket is another name for radicchio can replace those "Muskrat Love" lyrics which have become a bit of an earworm. Lest you think I am a fan, fear not! I much prefer "Ay, Radicchio!" or just about any other song. I thought perhaps RoRo was bringing up the muskrat tango with her dance comment (?)

      Yes, I think wry toast goes well with just about anything here. Enjoy your breakfast.



      Delete
  31. not much I can add, I had:
    His company has generated some press, but his name hasn't made waves. (2 references to electricity, I suppose)

    The food item - or at least its variants - is quite well-known. Now on to Sunday chores!!! (honeydew) Or maybe golf with Ben (Crenshaw). No time for a trip to Vegas (cantaloupe).

    To Will's credit, muskmelon is one of those terms I'd heard, but never really thought much about. And 2 minutes in Wikipedia I learned more than I knew in my life time. Unfortunately something else I knew has now been displaced.

    ReplyDelete
  32. These were great, ecoarchitect (the actual second chore boy), especially Ben Crenshaw.

    Not to worry, though. Likely all that was displaced were the words to "Muskrat Love."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "And they whirl and they twirl and they tango" .... dang, it's still there. One of the great embarrassments in the history of America (group, not country, which has many more embarrassments) is that they sang this song. Though I would love to have been a fly on the wall when Gerald Ford was outraged as the Captain and Tennille performed this at the White House.

      And Queen Elizabeth was there too. So perhaps it was an embarrassment for America the country, too.

      Delete
    2. ecoarchitect,

      You think the lyrics to Muskrat Love are embarrassing?Believe me, they are downright Dylanesque compared to the lyrics of Muskmelon Love!

      LegoedUpInBlue

      Delete
    3. Double America embarrassment, ecoarchitect.

      Lego, could you make us forget that whole song with the "Muskmelon Love" lyrics?

      I kid you not, the capthcha word was muskrat!

      Delete
  33. I posted on Sun Jun 01, at 05:57:00 PM PDT (That can't be right! only ONE MINUTE after I had posted the same on last week's thread? I'm SURE it was a lot longer than that!)

    I posted on Sun Jun 01, at 05:56:00 AM PDT on last week's thread:

    This is one of those puzzles which I think requires the internet. I had to look up the businessman on an internet list, and then when I saw what would turn out to be the answer, I had to enter it into Wikipedia to verify that yes, that’s a food item, all right. My submission to NPR actually includes the first sentence of the food item’s entry in Wikipedia.

    The internet list on which I found him is page 7 of the Forbes 400 Richest Americans list.

    And it was actually the first two sentences of the entry for "Muskmelon" in Wikipedia that I had entered in my submission to NPR.

    ReplyDelete
  34. While we're on the topic of muskmelons, one plays an important role in Penn & Teller's 1992 book, How To Play With Your Food, which I highly recommend. (This is where I learned about the electric pickle light, discussed previously).. You can read the relevant section (pp. 43-45) online at Amazon.com (which, I know, Stephen Colbert and Sherman Alexie and other Hachette authors want us to boycott, but they're not making any money off this).

    The subject of this chapter is the JFK assassination, specifically Oliver Stone's contention that, because the Zapruder film shows Kennedy's head moving back and to the left after being hit, the fatal shot must have come from the front right, i.e., from a second gunman on the grassy knoll, or thereabouts.

    P&T use a melon, some fiberglass tape, and a 6.5mm Mannlicher-Carcano rifle ("the same model that Oswald fired, but we were just showing off"), and, with a nod to physicist Luis Alvarez (who, with son Walter, came up with the asteroid-killed-the-dinosaurs conspiracy theory, of course), demonstrate that a human head simulacrum hit by a bullet moves toward, not away from, the shooter.

    They describe their experiment in admirable detail. My favorite line: "We both feel strongly that putting a melon wearing a pink pillbox hat next to the target melon is in very bad taste."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Is it true that the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation supported the publication of this book with a generous grant?

      Delete
    2. Not sure about the science of that experiment. Whatever one's politics, I think most agree that JFK was one of the few recent Presidents who wasn't a melonhead.

      Delete
    3. Or a Lemonhead. . .

      Say, anagram lovers, did you think Lemon Skum was too obvious? ;-)

      Delete
    4. I dunno, ecoarchitect -- dying young does wonders for one's reputation. I found it a bit shocking, years later, to listen to the Kennedy-Nixon debates, and hear JFK pushing that imaginary "missile gap", slamming the Eisenhower administration for being soft on Communism.

      Delete
    5. JFK was far from perfect, my point was he was not a melonhead, whatever that term means. His stance on Communism seems to have evolved; he was very hawkish at first, but then pursued detente with Khrushchev.

      Interesting side note, at the time those who watched the Kennedy-Nixon debates on TV thought Kennedy won. Those who listened on the radio thought Nixon was better.

      Delete
    6. Interesting -- I heard just the audio track. I did know that Nixon's sweaty brow (lip?) hurt him, while JFK's looks must've helped.

      At the time, TV-vs-radio probably split the audience by affluence, which doesn't seem to account for that result.

      Delete
    7. As a group of radio listeners, I wonder how many of us pay more attention to what is being said on the radio than on tv. The distraction of make-up/no make-up, sweating, suit colors, etc. drops away on radio.

      And tv has been focusing more on the extraneous stuff ever since. . .

      The affluence issue is an interesting one too, jan.

      Delete
    8. Interesting theory about affluence, but the Library of Congress says 90% of households had TV in 1960 (http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/awhhtml/awmi10/television.html). Also, a Gallop Poll at the time (http://www.gallup.com/poll/139880/election-polls-presidential-vote-groups.aspx#14) shows more educated voters and professional/ white collar voters going with Nixon, while less educated and manual labor voters going with Kennedy.

      Just another factoid trying to replace the Muskrat Love lyrics.

      Kennedy definitely won the good looks vote, Nixon refused to wear make-up, and had a cold, which combined with the sweating to create an uninspiring look. Debates were in black and white, so suit color didn't matter, but Nixon looks rather sallow.

      Delete
  35. Had the muskrat mambo more in mind

    ReplyDelete
  36. “Muskmelon Love”
    (Lyrics by Willis Alan Ramsey & Lego Lambda)

    Muskmelon, Muskmelon, handle us right,
    When squeezing’ us for ripeness, try to keep your touch light
    Which feels so pleasin’
    When we’re in season.

    MuskmeLonny, MuskmeLynn
    Drink from bitter jugs in the produce bin…
    Then some ninny
    Pokes Lynn’s navel (an innie).

    The jerk poises Lynn as if to slam her,
    Just like Gallagher with a sledgehammer,
    But shot-puts her toward potatoes instead
    (They were Idaho Red.)

    Lynn gets whirled like a dervish-crazed mango,
    Then trips up, speed-of-lightning fandango
    And is juggled toward the heavens above…
    This, muskmelon love!?

    The jerk twirls her, like Harlem Globetrotters,
    On his finger, now nose, as do otters,
    Or as seals do in some circus from hell…
    Lynn’s not doing well…

    Lonny ain’t takin’ any more from this sleaze,
    So says to him, “Sonny, if you don’t unseize
    Lynn, my missus,
    You’ll find out what a bris is!”

    Lynn is smitten by romance, she’s found her hero.
    They nuzzle and guzzle more jugs of merlot,
    And play like range antelope,
    Too bad they just can’t elope,
    But they can’t, they’re just cantaloupe…
    La da da da da, la da da din da da, La da da da da…

    (And you all thought “havoc ado” was a produce-aisle disaster!)

    Word Woman,
    Okay, wise gal, now how do we erase the above detritus from our gray matter!

    RoRo,
    Believe me, You do not want to hear the lyrics to “Muskrat Mambo,” or “Muskmelon Mambo,” for that matter.

    LegOscarSledgeHammerstein

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Much better, Lego. I could go with this, but I'm not sure about Gerry or Elizabeth.

      Thanks for sharing the innies and outies of your lyrical talents.

      Delete
  37. Oh I don't know. I kinda liked your tangled tango. specially the cant elope... cantaloupe part LOL

    ReplyDelete
  38. Next week puzzle:

    Part of TV that starts with a "C," replace with Book of Old Testament and come up with a sailing vessel of old.

    ReplyDelete
  39. New puzzle:

    Name part of a TV which contains the letter "C". Replace the C with the name of a book of the Old Testament, and the result will name a sailing vessel of old. What vessel is it?

    ReplyDelete
  40. This is the exact statement of the challenge from the NPR website:

    Next week's challenge: Name part of a TV that contains the letter C. Replace the C with the name of a book of the Old Testament, keeping all the letters in order. The result will name a sailing vessel of old. What is it?

    ReplyDelete
  41. My TV is sold old it is like junk.

    ReplyDelete
  42. the first thing I did was to start linking sites with ship names. then I continued by roamin' through the Old Testament. to complete the work I insist on draggin' mama Z into the fray. two heads are better than one on this one.
    please pardon my absence. I was in a digital free zone.

    ReplyDelete