Sunday, August 10, 2014

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Aug 10, 2014): What Does the Fox Say?

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Aug 10, 2014): What Does the Fox Say?:
Q: Name a well-known movie of the past — two words, seven letters in total. These seven letters can be rearranged to spell the name of an animal plus the sound it makes. What animal is it?


Edit: The hint is the arrow in the picture...
A: LA BAMBA --> LAMB, BAA

107 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. This is not about today’s puzzle but I don’t know of any other group of people I’d rather ask than those who hang around here. I’m looking for a PC-based anagram solver with certain properties.

    It will accept words or phrases one-at-a-time from a text file each element of which is separated by a carriage return/line feed sequence. It will solve for the anagrams for that individual word or phrase and then pause before going on to the next element. It will get the next element after a keystroke or mouse click. It will send output to the screen or another text file or both. This just strikes me as being much more efficient than having to individually type in words or phrases.

    It can be freeware or $$ software – either is fine with me. Anyone know if such a beast is available and where I might locate it?

    Thanks.

    Chuck

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. THIS is not exactly what you are requesting, but check it out anyway.

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    2. Thanks, Ron. I'll check it out.

      Chuck

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    3. I created a very basic Anagram Solver as well as Scrabble solution finder.

      http://app.josephpconley.com/puzzles

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    4. Thanks for the suggestions to all three of you.

      Chuck

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  3. The first time I went to the drive-in, I saw this movie. Sorry if that gives it away.

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  4. At first I thought it must be the 1964 movie by Peter Weiss, "The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat As Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of the Marquis of Sade." When I counted the number of words and letters I realized my error.

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  6. I knew I was out of luck when I heard it was a movie clue. I've always been such a disgrace to my family when it comes to film knowledge.

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  7. I am not saying I have solved it yet, but an answer just came to me a few minutes ago that technically works, but seems too uncomplicated to be the intended answer, but it does work. If this is indeed the intended answer the main star of the film had something in common with the title.

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  8. Love you guys, but I have seriously considered dropping out of these discussions. Just got back (well, after a day at the beach) from the Lollapuzzoola 7 crossword tournament, and it made me realize how much time I am sacrificing to the endless rehash of various puzzles. I need to get a life! (Like that would ever happen!)

    ReplyDelete
  9. The following 3 posts regarding this week's puzzle were made near the end of last week's thread:

    SuperZee posted on Sun Aug 10, at 07:49:00 AM PDT:

    I don't think the movie is all that well known, but you will have to agree the music rocks.

    Then Lorenzo posted on Sun Aug 10, at 08:37:00 AM PDT:

    One of this blog's regulars should have no trouble solving this one,

    ...to which I replied on Sun Aug 10, at 09:41:00 AM PDT:

    No, neither Enya nor Weird Al Yankovic contributed any music to the movie, although a movie to which Enya DID contribute has something in common with it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My friend Aggie loves that country song "Sweet Home Chicago"
      I think.

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    2. The moral of the story is "Trust Your Instincts."

      WW

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  10. I started running through some kids songs to stir things up. Old MacDonald's farm wasn't all that helpful, Kokoraki, no help at all. Maybe Stephen Foster...?

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  11. Nursery rhymes & XMAS time!

    Believe it or not, I clearly got it!

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  12. Haven't solved this puzzle yet (if a TOAD could SOB, DAS BOOT would work), but found a related one:

    Name a well-known movie of the past — two words, seven letters in total. These seven letters can be rearranged to spell the name of a male animal plus the name of the female of the same animal. What are they?

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    1. I played with Das Boot auch. I auch played with The Hill and Red Dawn, but felt it is too bad an adder doesn't say "Hi" when introductions are in order so that Die Hard could work. I did not find very many seven letter, two word movies out there. I finally got the answer by just thinking about the animal sounds and the film title just popped into my head, although I'm unsure if I ever heard or saw it. I don't think it is on any of the lists I looked at, including one with one thousand titles.

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    2. Name a well-known (?) movie of the past — two words, seven letters in total. These seven letters can be rearranged to spell the name of a male animal plus the name of the female of the same animal plus one letter left over. What are they?

      Delete
    3. I got a bad feeling about this.

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    4. "MR. MAGOO" anagrams to "RAM GO OM", but I've never heard (herd?) a ram go "om". (Ram Dass, maybe?)

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    5. I did once while hiking in the Olympic National Park. This ram was using a Moog synthesizer.

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    6. You must be thinking of the Dolly Llama

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    7. Or perhaps his wife, the Doily Llama.

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    8. ron, I would say the skydiver was not the only one wearing a fly suit. Down there where things can get Rio very fast.

      Delete
  13. I wonder...you seven letters. What are you? I do wonder. Yes,sir. I do indeed.

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  14. Replies
    1. "Mork and Mindy's house" in Boulder was the number one attraction for family and friends who visited here in CO in the early 80's. Very sad, indeed, for all of us to lose Robin Williams' wit and wisdom.

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    2. Goose honk. It's 9 letters. Sue me.

      Delete
  15. Comparing IMDb movie titles against a self-generated list of 125 animal/sound combinations returns seven answers, though only one stands out.

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  16. To this week's answer, add three consonants and rearrange to get an animal that was the name of a character in a well-known movie of the past.

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  17. Does anyone have a way to privately contact Blaine? I've noticed an unintentional spoiler, and I'd rather not publicly call attention to the specific details.

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    1. I don't see a "dead give-away," and if there was, Blaine would take care of it.

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    2. What was the spoiler you noticed, PC?

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    3. Methinks PC noticed Blaine's "unintentional" "spoiler".

      And I still don't know what the fox says.

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    4. Paul,
      Mae West was a fox, just like Errol Flynn was a wolf, and she said, ""Come up and see me sometime." I can't imagine what she was referring to. Perhaps I should keep abreast of these things.

      Delete
    5. Michael A. became Michael J. just to avoid unnecessary confusion. (So I've heard)

      Delete
    6. "But there’s one sound that no one knows…
      WHAT DOES THE FOX SAY?

      Ring-ding-ding-ding-dingeringeding!
      Gering-ding-ding-ding-dingeringeding!
      Gering-ding-ding-ding-dingeringeding!
      WHAT THE FOX SAY?

      Wa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pow!
      Wa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pow!
      Wa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pa-pow!
      WHAT THE FOX SAY?

      Hatee-hatee-hatee-ho!
      Hatee-hatee-hatee-ho!
      Hatee-hatee-hatee-ho!
      WHAT THE FOX SAY?

      Joff-tchoff-tchoff-tchoffo-tchoffo-tchoff!
      Joff-tchoff-tchoff-tchoffo-tchoffo-tchoff!
      Joff-tchoff-tchoff-tchoffo-tchoffo-tchoff!
      WHAT THE FOX SAY?

      Big blue eyes, pointy nose, chasing mice, and digging holes.
      Tiny paws, up the hill, suddenly you’re standing still.
      Your fur is red, so beautiful, like an angel in disguise.
      But if you meet a friendly horse, will you communicate by mo-o-o-o-orse, mo-o-o-o-orse, mo-o-o-o-orse?
      How will you speak to that h-o-o-orse, h-o-o-orse, h-o-o-orse?
      WHAT DOES THE FOX SAY?!

      Jacha-chacha-chacha-chow!
      Jacha-chacha-chacha-chow!
      Jacha-chacha-chacha-chow!
      WHAT THE FOX SAY?

      Fraka-kaka-kaka-kaka-kow!
      Fraka-kaka-kaka-kaka-kow!
      Fraka-kaka-kaka-kaka-kow!
      WHAT THE FOX SAY?

      A-hee-ahee ha-hee!
      A-hee-ahee ha-hee!
      A-hee-ahee ha-hee!
      WHAT THE FOX SAY?

      A-oo-oo-oo-ooo!
      Woo-oo-oo-ooo!
      WHAT DOES THE FOX SAY?!

      The secret of the fox, ancient mystery.
      Somewhere deep in the woods, I know you’re hiding.
      What is your sound? Will we ever know?
      Will always be a mystery what do you say?

      You’re my guardian angel hiding in the woods.
      What is your sound? (A-bubu-duh-bubu-dwee-dum a-bubu-duh-bubu-dwee-dum)
      Will we ever know? (A-bubu-duh-bubu-dwee-dum)
      I want to, I want to, I want to know! (A-bubu-duh-bubu-dwee-dum)
      (Bay-buh-day bum-bum bay-dum)"

      I've heard them . . .;-)

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    7. Oops! I didn't Google, therefor I'm not.

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    8. . . .Paul, and in case you were wondering what the GEEP says (see embedded video).

      Delete
  18. All I can say is...rest in peace.

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    Replies
    1. My sentiments.....ditto ditto.....

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  19. I had trouble when I first essayed to solve this puzzle because the movie title didn't show up on a list of anagrams of the animal and sound.

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  20. There's an (indirect) connection to A Streetcar Named Desire (the third one this year!).

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  21. Hmm, where is our young friend, anyway?

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  22. I just drove past a building that has ties to this puzzle.

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  23. jan,
    Seriously, all your comments on Blainesville and at PEOTS are astute, informative and creative. I really appreciate your intelligent and entertaining posts. I think I speak for many Blainesvillians and PEOTSians.
    Lego…

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    1. Thanks, Lego. Loved the trompe l'oeil and other stuff on Puzzle-ria! this week!

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    2. "LA BAMBA" >>> LAMB, BAA

      The MORAL of the story is "Trust Your Instincts" referred to the movie starring Esai MORALes.


      Lorenzo's clue about "someone here should have no trouble solving this" immediately made me think of legoLAMBda (rather than Enya and WAF) as did ron's "El Greco" clue. Trusting my instincts on those two clues eventually paid off (thanks, jan!).

      It took awhile to make the leap to "La Bamba" as I have only a hazy, vague recollection of the movie as I was in the last year of grad school then.

      And, of course, lego. . . .Duh = legoLAMBDuh! ;-)

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    3. I thought "Trust Your Instincts" referred to Richie Valens' fear of flying and recurring dream of a plane crash.

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    4. That works too, jan.

      And I thought ron's El Greco glue referred to the exhibit "From El Greco to Goya" which features a Sheep's head by Goya and a sheep skull by Picasso as the signature paintings. . .

      http://nymag.com/arts/art/reviews/24742/

      So I knew lamb and baa from that, from LegoLambda, and Blaine's illustration. It took me until early this morning, though, to come with "La Bamba." Geesh, there's only so many ways to rearrange LAMB BAA! (Duh!)

      It does not appear as though submitting later in the week floated my name to the top of the "DO CALL LIST," however.

      Delete
  24. Paul: Re the Italian in the Chinese restaurant. How about "Waiter, these breadsticks are too al dente."

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    1. When the waiter brings a sauce to the table, the diner says (one might even say he barks) "Yo! No soy! Marinara!".

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    2. So it was a hint to the puzzle answer after all! Very clever!

      Delete
  25. A fond farewell to Bob K who announced this week that he may be leaving Blainesville to seek "a life". We'll miss you.

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  26. CRY WOLF > WOLF & CRY

    This was an Errol Flynn & Barbara Stanwyck movie from 1947.

    My Hint:

    “…the main star of the film had something in common with the title.”

    The old saying, “In like Flynn,” was referencing his promiscuous behavior. Therefore Errol Flynn was considered a wolf.

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    Replies
    1. I found confirmation of my answer not only from checking the movie and the animal sound via Google searches, but also from Lorenzo's post that made me think of Wolfgang.

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    2. Also WS did not say to anagram the film in order to get the answer, but he used the word, rearrange. Also this was a major film of the "past." All of this led me to Cry Wolf and Wolf Cry. I bet WS won't even mention it on air.

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  27. LA BAMBA -> LAMB, BAA

    > I had trouble when I first essayed to solve this puzzle ...

    Charles LAMB (1775-1834) was a famous English essayist. Will Shortz often clues ESSAY in crosswords with "LAMB OUTPUT", e.g.

    > ... because the movie title didn't show up on a list of anagrams of the animal and sound.

    That's what happens when you look for English anagrams only!

    > There's an (indirect) connection to A Streetcar Named Desire (the third one this year!).

    Streetcar was directed by Elia Kazan. "Elia" was Charles LAMB's nom de plume.

    > Hmm, where is our young friend, anyway?

    Hadn't heard here from Joseph Young, a.k.a. LegoLAMBda, in weeks.


    > Name a well-known movie of the past — two words, seven letters in total. These seven letters can be rearranged to spell the name of a male animal plus the name of the female of the same animal. What are they?

    The Road -> hart, doe.

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    1. "Name a well-known (?) movie of the past — two words, seven letters in total. These seven letters can be rearranged to spell the name of a male animal plus the name of the female of the same animal plus one letter left over. What are they?"

      The Omen -> Tom, Hen, E (Turkeys)

      Delete
  28. It's the Greek L, L Greco, Λ, LAMB DUH!

    Movie: LA BAMBA (1987).

    Animal: LAMB.

    Sound the animal makes: BAA.

    Should be easy for “LogoΛ”☺

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  29. LA BAMBA ==> LAMB, BAA

    I posted on Mon Aug 11, at 05:09:00 AM PDT:

    The following 3 posts regarding this week's puzzle were made near the end of last week's thread:

    SuperZee posted on Sun Aug 10, at 07:49:00 AM PDT:

    I don't think the movie is all that well known, but you will have to agree the music rocks.

    Then Lorenzo posted on Sun Aug 10, at 08:37:00 AM PDT:

    One of this blog's regulars should have no trouble solving this one,

    ...to which I replied on Sun Aug 10, at 09:41:00 AM PDT:

    No, neither Enya nor Weird Al Yankovic contributed any music to the movie, although a movie to which Enya DID contribute has something in common with it.

    Enya contributed 3 songs to L.A. Story, a comedy starring Steve Martin and his wife at the time, Victoria Tennant.

    Of course, L.A. Story has the same first two letters in its title as La Bamba.

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  30. My clues: nursery rhymes: "Baa baa black sheep." Xmas: "Baa humbug."

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  31. Lamb (La Bamba - lamb + baa) I thought of adding another "ditto" after learning of Lauren Bacall's passing, but it would have been too maudlin.

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  32. So, is no one going to mention Blaine's clue? Usually, his illustrations aren't hints themselves, but this week, with no written clue, his See'N'Say is pointing right to the lamb. (OK, sheep, but still!)

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    1. Jan, this was indeed the unintentional giveaway I was referencing earlier. I assume Blaine's choice of image would have been different had he known the answer ahead of time.

      Delete
  33. From my comment: Love you guys, . . . realize how much time I am sacrificing to the endless rehash of various puzzles. I need to get a life! (Like that would ever happen!)

    "Sacrificing" to clue the sacrificial lamb.

    ""Love you guys"? - nah, part of the Lamb of God schtick.

    And thanks for the farewell, Lorenzo, but even I recognize that me getting a life ain't gonna happen. You're stuck with me.

    And BTW, skydiveboy, it has always puzzled me that Will Shortz seems never to use the word "anagram", as if it were trademarked, or unknown, but always says "rearrange."

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    Replies
    1. Bob,
      I hadn't noticed, or perhaps forgot, that Will Shortz prefers rearrange over anagram, but I have noticed he rarely uses the word, homophone. Instead he usually says something like it sounding the same phonetically when spoken out loud. I keep wondering if we are being talked down to, or perhaps he doesn't want to offend a gay telephone.

      Anyway, glad you are not actually getting a life. I gave up on that happening too.

      Delete
    2. Yeah, Bob K.

      So glad you will stay.

      To make our way,

      On a Kerfuffle-y day.

      WW

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    3. Poet Person:

      Don't quit your day job. :-)

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    4. Excellent suggestion. Joyce Kilmer, I am not ;-).

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  34. Beach Boys--> Barbara Ann.

    Ba ba ba ba Barbara Ann
    Ba ba ba ba Barbara Ann
    Ba ba ba ba Barbara Ann (take my hand)
    Ba ba ba ba Barbara Ann
    Ba ba ba ba Barbara Ann

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  35. Thanks to Enya_and_Weird_Al_fan for moving my post to this week. Speaking of weak, my post included the phrase "...you will have to agree the music rocks," which was intended as a play on ewe - and a comment on the movies rock and roll flashbacks. Oh well...

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  36. Aside from the official answer, here are other alternates I found — all rather lame by comparison:

    Man Talk (both a movie title & animal + sound);
    Cry Baby (movie title) anagrams to Baby Cry;
    Cry Wolf (movie title) anagrams to Fowl Cry, Wolf Cry.

    And now for a bit of pedantry. Describing a movie as being in “the past” only eliminates titles still in production, since by definition every movie that has been released is in “the past”. I assume the intent was to communicate that the movie was released, say, more than ten years ago — but if that's the case, the puzzle should have been stated that way.

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  37. I just listened to this one hour 2010 wonderful interview with Robin Williams. I recommend you do too.

    http://www.wtfpod.com/podcast/episodes/remembering_robin_williams

    Robin, you always left me laughing. Why did you have to finally leave me crying? I love you Robin. Thanks for the memories. We all loved you so much, my friend, and we still do. We always will.

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  38. I wonder...you seven letters. What are you? I do wonder. Yes,sir. I do indeed.

    Twinkle, twinkle little star.
    A, B, C, D, E, F, G
    Baa, baa black sheep.

    The Song Remains The Same

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  39. SDB:
    I've had Parkinson's for eight years. I was known, believe it or not, for quick wit. Now I can hardly say my name. If Robin knew this, I suspect it would have affected him more than all the other problems.

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    1. That very well may be. I suppose we'll never know for sure, especially since he apparently didn't even leave a note. I read something about him also having serious money problems. I am really surprised at that. I never heard anything about a gambling problem or womanizing. Something may be being covered up too by his family. I thought it was odd that he and his wife were apparently sleeping in separate bedrooms. Things are so often much different than they appear to be. Sorry to hear you have that affliction, it must be an enormous challenge. I wish you well.

      Delete
    2. MrScience, thank you for bravely sharing your journey with us. My grandmother struggled with this disease in the last year of her 90 year life. Wishing you all the best, hoping for a cure.

      These words about Robin from Peter Coyote resonated with me. They were written before Robin's Parkinson's Disease was revealed to us. I imagine not being able to use your incredible gifts the same way would be so challenging. . .

      Robin Williams' last gift


      "Robin and I were friends. Not intimate, because he was very shy when he was not performing. Still, I spent many birthdays and holidays at his home with Marsha and the children, and he showed up at my 70th birthday to say “Hello” and wound up mesmerizing my relatives with a fifteen minute set that pulverized the audience.

      When I heard that he had died, I put my own sorrow aside for a later time. I’m a Zen Buddhist priest and my vows instruct me to try to help others. So this little letter is meant in that spirit.

      Normally when you are gifted with a huge talent of some kind, it’s like having a magnificent bicep. People will say, “Wow, that’s fantastic” and they tell you, truthfully, that it can change your life, take you to unimaginable realms. It can and often does. The Zen perspective is a little different. We might say, “Well, that’s a great bicep, you don’t have to do anything to it. Let’s work at bringing the rest of your body up to that level.


      Robin’s gift could be likened to fastest thoroughbred race-horse on earth. It had unbeatable endurance, nimbleness, and a huge heart. However, it had never been fully trained. Sometimes Robin would ride it like a kayaker tearing down white-water, skimming on the edge of control. We would marvel at his courage, his daring, and his brilliance. But at other times, the horse went where he wanted, and Robin could only hang on for dear life.

      In the final analysis, what failed Robin was his greatest gift---his imagination. Clutching the horse he could no longer think of a single thing to do to change his life or make himself feel better, and he stepped off the edge of the saddle. Had the horse been trained, it might have reminded him that there is always something we can do. We can take a walk until the feeling passes. We can find someone else suffering and help them, taking the attention off our own. Or, finally, we can learn to muster our courage and simply sit still with what we are thinking are insoluble problems, becoming as intimate with them as we can, facing them until we get over our fear. They may even be insoluble, but that does not mean that there is nothing we can do.


      Our great-hearted friend will be back as the rain, as the cry of a Raven as the wind. He, you and I have never for one moment not been a part of all it. But we would be doing his life and memory a dis-service if we did not extract some wisdom from his choice, which, if we ponder deeply enough, will turn out to be his last gift. He would beg us to pay attention if he could."



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    5. It’s tough to follow (with my inevitably inane ramblings) the poignant and courageous sharing (by MrScience) and all the other wisdom (and poetry!) posted above.

      (Sorry, Blaine and Blainesvillians, about my two previous false starts with this post.)

      But I just wanted you all to know that I have finally posted this week’s Puzzleria! after a day’s tardiness.

      Bob K. and sdb (happy to hear neither of you is not leaving us or “getting a life”),
      I have noticed also WS’s apparent aversion to “anagrams” and “homophones.” None of us, of course, wants to offend a gay telephone, sdb, or, worse yet, offend a “telesexual,” those who engage in long-distance relationships.

      But I want to cut Will some slack. He is not “talking down to us,” I believe, but just trying to make the wording of his puzzles as accessible as possible for as many solvers as possible. Words like “homophone” and even “anagram” might send some solvers running before giving the puzzle a try.

      PlannedChaos,
      I agree with your “bit of pedantry,” for whatever that is worth… probably about two-cents’-worth.

      MrScience,
      I can easily believe you were known for your quick wit. I do not presume to know what you believe about “human spirituality” and the supernatural, but I will keep you in my prayers, if that is okay with you. I believe that prayer can sometimes make a difference. I admire your willingness to share your Parkinson’s with us. That’s tough to do, I would imagine.

      I got to know the “Catholic” Minnesota novelist Jon Hassler some when he was a writer in residence at Minnesota’s Saint John’s University and I was a School of Theology student there. We weren’t exactly friends but he was very generous with his time and he discussed the writing process with me. He was a wonderful, gentle man. Later, when I worked for a Catholic newspaper, I did as many stories about him as I could get away with.

      Jon was diagnosed in 1994 “with progressive supranuclear palsy, a disease similar to Parkinson's. It caused vision and speech problems, as well as difficulty walking, but he was able to continue writing. He was reported to have finished a novel just days before his death. Hassler died in 2008, at the age of 74.”

      He faced his Parkinson’s-like symptoms with courage and grace, as I am sure you are also.

      After he died, one of the last columns I wrote I headlined “Matthew, Mark, Luke and Jon,” arguing that, as an accessible and insightful novelist, he was probably more of an “evangelist,” a proclaimer of “good news,” than any of those that actually got published in the Good Book.

      My prayer for you, MrScience, is for good news.

      Lego…

      Delete
  40. WW,
    Thanks for your beautiful essay. All words of comfort are welcome; yours especially so. But then I would have expected no less from you.

    Lego;
    You are most welcome to pray, for me, and for all others who share this debilitating disease. I am a man of faith too. I value your concern, and the ways you choose to express it.

    I am doing wonderfully well -- why else would a sane person hang out in this barn? I am blessed with a caring, supportive and loving family, whose core is my wife, for whom I thank God every day. I am completing work on a non-fiction book on (well, what else?) science. Mercifully, my brain seems to be working about as well as ever. (Now now, SDB, keep your voice down ...) I get good news every day.

    La Bamba??!! Yes, like most all of you I got it right away, and threw it back. Let's hope this week's effort is more fun. Maybe in the next few minutes one of us will post the new puzzle, and we can start our feeding frenzy.

    Thanks again to all.

    MrScience

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    Replies
    1. MrScience, would like to know more about your book on science (I am penning one also). Perhaps we overlap. . .WW

      Delete
  41. Replies
    1. Once again, Sam Loyd's name is misspelled. (Pedantry on my part again - it'll probably be fixed shortly.)

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  43. This puzzle represents a new low, as the answer can be Googled directly. No hinting needed.

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  44. I did it the old-fashioned way -- I decided to EARN it. And before long, there it was.

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  45. In my submission to the NPR website, I started off with a simple proof that there is only ONE way it can be done!!

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  46. A friend in law enforcement once commented that the difficulty in solving crimes is not that the absence of clues - but the fact there are too many. This puzzle proves his point.

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  47. Also having a unique solution: Scoring exactly 93 points.

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  48. WW - I want to join others in thanking you for sharing Peter Coyote's thoughtful words. Robin Williams' humor meant a lot to my wife and me, and we are saddened by the pain that he must have endured.

    ReplyDelete