Sunday, February 08, 2015

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 8, 2015): Knock! knock!

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 8, 2015): Knock! knock!:
Q: Name someone who's the subject of many jokes; two words. Remove the space between the words. Insert the letters O and N in that order — not necessarily consecutively — inside this string of letters. The result, reading from left to right, will be two words of opposite meaning that this someone might say. Who is it, and what are the words?
Who's there?

Edit: My hints this week were to arriving at the pearly gates hoping to enter. As for the discrepancy in the wording regarding the missing period in ST. PETER, that didn't bother me. Knowing that the puzzle's creator (Peter Collins) as well as Will Shortz are cruciverbalists, they would both be familiar with fitting a name like ST. PETER into a crossword answer as just STPETER
A: ST PETER --> STOP ENTER

156 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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    1. Is that a musical clue, Blaine?

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  2. I am sure you've all heard of BRAD ARROW jokes, n'est-ce pas?

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    1. As Brad Arrow always says, (his signature paunch line), “That's the broad & narrow of it!”

      Of course, the "intended" answer, I think, is: St. Peter>>>STOP + GO.

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    2. OOPS. Make that STOP + ENTER. Ugh!

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  3. I'm reminded of the joke, "what do you get if you cross an elephant with a rhinoceros?"

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    1. Bfzetyr qczx esp Fcmly Otnetzylcj:
      Bfzetyr qczx esp Fcmly Otnetzylcj:

      Esp xzde Rzowj uzvp zy esp awlype. Jzf htww wlfrs jzfc ldd zqq ufde estyvtyr lmzfe te, te'd lhpdzxpypdd htww dppa esczfrs pgpcj azcp zy jzfc mzoj. Lyo jzf htww dpi htes te.
      Esp xzde Rzowj uzvp zy esp awlype. Jzf htww wlfrs jzfc ldd zqq ufde estyvtyr lmzfe te, te'd lhpdzxpypdd htww dppa esczfrs pgpcj azcp zy jzfc mzoj. Lyo jzf htww dpi htes te.

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    2. What do you call a deer with no eyes?

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    3. jan,
      I have no idea, but where do you find a dog with no legs?

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    4. jan,
      Tough but tasty riddle. Lathter ensues.

      Will's puzzle this week is a good one, his on-air challenge was excellent, and Paul, the on-air player, was really ready for prime time..
      (No hints in this post)

      LegoSALTlick

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    5. Has this blog switched to "Best fifth grade jokes ever?" ;-)

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    6. Fifth grade?

      Wow, do I need to recalibrate!

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    7. Consulted with Terry Gross who recommended I ask "And your interesting answer?"

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    8. I was a fifth-grader fifty years ago. I heard the 'dog with no legs joke from my boss 10-15 years ago. I told it to my Dad, who grinned. You do the math.

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    9. legs'

      Actually, it probably should be "dog ...legs", but I'm lazy. A

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  4. All my jokes which are suitable for mixed audiences, begin, "A Rabbi, a Priest, and a Minister...." But that wasn't as much of a handicap as I thought it would be.

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  5. I'll be glad when someone answers this so I can get some peace around here!

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  6. I hope Peter Collins of Ann Arbor, Mich. gets a worse version of the cold I'm getting over, if such a thing is possible. Too tough this week!

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  7. Stumped this week. Can't decide if it's an actual person or a group of people or part of an organization?

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  8. I dug through about 32,000 lbs of "Yo mama's so fat" jokes before it hit me.

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    1. I agree, SuperZee. jan has been in a clever-clue roll of late. Blaine's clues were both excellent this week also.
      Others also likely planted great but subtle clues in their comments that I was just to dense to perceive.

      LegoImpressedButNotTheSharpesBulbInTheToolbox

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  9. Haven't figure it out still working on it

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  10. Haven't figure it out still working on it

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  11. Have faith, for though cryptic you will come to the answer in time.

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  12. As I posted earlier, I like this week’s NPR puzzle. But I do believe the wording in the first few sentences is somewhat unfair. I have posted what I believe is a more fair rewording over on the comments section of my puzzle blog, Puzzleria! The time stamp on the pertinent post is February 8 at 6:49 PM. I think it would be presumptuous of me to post it on this great blog. Blaine may not want his commenters to start rewording Will’s puzzles on his space. (What is really presumptuous, of course, is my editing of any puzzles purveyed by Will Shortz, the renowned and acclaimed NYT crossword puzzle editor and puzzle master! It takes gall and stones, and I got both {all three?}. And, I truly admire the man and his accomplishments.)

    But the main reason I’m posting my link to Puzzleria!, as many of you veteran Blainesvillians are well aware, is so I can shamelessly plug my own blog. There have been many “newbie” commenters here lately and they may not be familiar with the pleasures of Puzzleria! As usual, we have served up three fresh puzzles this week. One is definitely easier than Will’s offering this week, another is about as difficult, and the another may be a bit tougher.

    As usual, I thank Blaine for letting me self-promote. If you do click the link to visit Puzzleria!, linger a bit, but then backtrack to Blainesville.

    LegoJustPluggingAway

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    1. Between the cryptogram and legolambda's rewording, I solved it. Thank heaven.

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    2. A little petroleum jelly should loosen them right up.

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    3. Look in mah ear and tell me watchu see, mon.

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    4. You mean right through that hole in the bone there?

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    5. Kinda like a key hole to the Zeke dome.

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  13. Lego - I agree. A very satisfying puzzle that requirers no special knowledge, but that can be improved using your wording.

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    1. Thank you, Lorenzo.
      BTW, thanks to you, I have been trying to maintain a "low-anagram" diet on my Puzzleria! menus lately. But I'm afraid I'm going to have to cheat a bit on this Friday's St. Valentine's Day edition.

      LegoNoRearrangingRequired

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    2. Instead of a "low-anagram diet" why don't you try some WORDPLAY Ambigrams!

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    3. Them is yummy, ron. Thanks for post-toasting! Blaine's logo is an ambigram, no? Blaine, can you weigh in?

      ron, you are truly up on all the best websites.

      LegoAmbigrammatical

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  14. Speaking of which, did you hear the one about...?

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  15. Lorenzo,

    About Ole and Lena. Sure. I live in Minnie-Soata, after all. Ole and Lena are my next-door neighbors. They are Norwegian and their last name is Oslo. The Oslos have been buying their butter at Olson’s Creamery for so long that they have naturally taken to calling their table butter simply “Olson’s”

    During dinner, for example, Ole will say, “None of that oleo for me, Lena. It makes me soil my shorts. Will you please instead pass the Olson’s?”

    Okay, so take OLE OSLO. Add an O to make OLEO, then add an N to get OLSON (Yeah, I know, you gotta flip-flop the S and L, and N is not “inside the string of letters.” I think Will just forgot to mention that stuff.)

    But my initial answer was even worse. I took “someone who’s the subject of many jokes” to mean “someone who’s the butt of many jokes.” So, I naturally thought it might be Kim Kardashian, but I couldn’t add an O and N and have it make any sense. (And besides, I assume Kim has already done some adding and padding on her own.)

    Speaking of worse, I will now recalibrate our above riddlefest from the fifth-grade level down to about grade 2:
    How do you make a Venetian bind?

    LegOakHisPiesOut

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  16. Still don't get this week's puzzle. I REALLY don't need this right now. Later this afternoon I have a doctor's appointment, so I could care less about this puzzle the more I think about it. As puzzles go, this one seems impossible to solve, and I honestly think there is no answer to this crappy puzzle. I've never known them to go to air without a winner, but thanks to an idiot like Peter Collins there's a first time for everything. I know trying to get over a cold doesn't help me be more patient with this sort of thing, but I hope I sound a little more civil about this. I realize some winners have won more than once, and the odds of me winning again so soon must be astronomical, but still it should at least be fun doing this. I'm not too crazy about this week's convoluted puzzle in the first place.

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  17. BTW since we're doing old jokes or variations thereof, here's my joke about this week's puzzle: Why is Peter Collins' head like his puzzle? Answer: There's nothing in it either.

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    1. I agree. This is a shitty puzzle and poorly presented too.

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  18. Try casting a wider net when narrowing down the answer to this puzzle...

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  19. Got it finally. Not any happier about the wording of this one though >_< but all the clues make sense now lol. Hallelujah.

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  20. Will may not accept the answer I came up with because the second one of my "two words of opposite meaning" is not really a word, but rather an initialism (that is, kind of an "acronym-lite," one, like FBI, that is not easy to pronounce {as the true acronym "scuba" is, for example} but instead is spelled outwhen spoken, like F-B-I).

    Still, it's all I got, so I will submit it and hope Will bites. And the lapel pin will be mine, mine, all mine!

    So, a priest, a minister and a rabbi walk into a bar... Hold it right there. "a rabbi," you say? A RABBI = ARAB + BI ---> ARAB + OBNI.

    Now, I am not Jewish, but I would think a rabbi from Great Britain just might have a thing or two to say about this!

    LegoObnixious

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    2. ...and the bartender says, "What is this, a joke?"

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  21. Since I'm still relatively a newcomer to the Sunday Puzzle, I'm wondering if a puzzle idea I had recently doesn't sound like something they might have done in the earlier days of the puzzle. See what you think: Think of a popular song and album title from the 1970's. The letters in this title can be rearranged to spell two articles of clothing. What's the title, and what are the anagrams? Unlike this week's puzzle, this one's quite simple. I'll reveal the answer Thursday.

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    1. pjb,
      It is a fairly good and fair puzzle, I think. But sister-kissers who live in our nation's capital should get this one fairly easy.

      LegoFairlyLazy

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  22. It's nothing to break up the band over, I assure you. Just know unlike this week's challenge from Mr. Collins, there will be an answer.

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  23. Back to the fifth grade thing. Playground games. Mother may I, red light green light, and so on...

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  25. While you're waiting for the answer to my puzzle or that of Mr. Collins(don't hold your breath), I thought I'd share a few interesting anagrams I've stumbled upon over the years. Enjoy.

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  27. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  28. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  29. BIRTHDAY SUIT (I'D BUY A T-SHIRT)

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  30. AGE BEFORE BEAUTY (GEE BABE, AFTER YOU)

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  31. BERMUDA TRIANGLE (A GAMBLE I'D RETURN)

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  32. HOMELAND SECURITY (HE MISLED A COUNTRY)

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  33. LONG DISTANCE DEDICATION (CANDID LEAD-IN TO CITE SONG)

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  34. Sorry if it's taking too long posting these. I'm good at typing, it's just hard to try to space words out. Preview doesn't exactly help when you want to see how it's going to look sometimes. The anagrams are all in parentheses.

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  35. I am in shock. I just heard minutes ago that Richard Sher, the host and creator of Says You! died yesterday. He will be greatly missed.

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    1. sdb,
      I'm embarrassed to admit I was not familiar with Mr. Sher. My local NPR stations did not carry his show. My loss.

      I read his obit story in the Boston Globe. I liked the following quote:
      People used to say, ‘Gee, the show is hard.’ But it’s not important to know the answers,” (Sher) told the Globe in 2006. “You just have to like the answers.”

      I should use that as a motto for Puzzleria! You have to create puzzles with answers that make people smile, or say, "Of course!" Not easy to do.

      Thank you for introducing him to me. Maybe I can find some of his shows online.

      LegoNewSherFan

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    2. You can access all via the archives at his web site:

      http://www.saysyou.net/

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    3. Xajbp tse tneecnpt ts selvpn. Llw yzu sage eo oo eo ree iy id pcoge jof'rp nzt l rzbzt. Lno nzbzdj kyohs tf jof'rp a oor.

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  36. I am in more shock than you. I only just got back on here to see if I got a reply. When did Richard Sher die yesterday? What's going to happen to Says You now? It was one of my favorite radio shows, and he was a big part of it. I'm especially going to miss the categories where you had to figure out the "ridiculous puns and clues" that usually left the audience booing and groaning and hissing. He truly was a "rose among thorns", and he will be missed.

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    1. www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2015/02/10/richard-sher-created-and-hosted-radio-quiz-show-says-you/cxMVjm...

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  37. We've lost quite a few of the greatest voices in broadcasting lately------Paul Harvey, Casey Kasem, Don Pardo------now Richard Sher. I hope they do continue Says You, though it will never be the same without him. I still can't believe we've lost another great legend.

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  38. "This show is best when we get your questions, when we get your comments, and most of all when you show up." Thanks Richard, for always showing up.

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  39. ST. PETER -> STOP, ENTER

    > Is that a musical clue, Blaine?

    Knock, Knock, Knockin' on Heaven's Door

    > I dug through about 32,000 lbs of "Yo mama's so fat" jokes before it hit me.

    "You load sixteen tons, what do you get?
    Another day older and deeper in debt.
    Saint Peter, don't you call me, 'cause I can't go.
    I owe my soul to the company store."


    My conversation with zeke creek about rocks in his head (petrology), petroleum jelly, and the hole in the skull through which the ear canal passes (the petrous part of the temporal bone) referred to words derived from the Greek for rock, Shimon bar Yona's other name.

    And (I don't know why I bother mentioning this) the theme of today's New York Times crossword is (spoiler alert) "Corner Stone".

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    1. jan and zeke creek, I stayed out of the rock conversations so as not to be too obvious. . .though I enjoyed them greatly!

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    3. Thanks, for the link, jan, to a fine version of one of my favorite Dylan songs (and that's sayin' somethin'!). Is this Traveling Wilburys-era Dylan, late 1980s, do you think?

      When you asked Blaine if his "Who's there?" was a musical clue, I thought you were alluding to Pete(r) Townsend of the Who.

      Knowing Blaine, he was probably thinking of both.

      LegojanFanAndBlainiac

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  40. ST. PETER >>> STOP, ENTER

    "Up or Down?" referred to what St. Peter might say to someone as he said "Stop" or "Enter" at the pearly gates. I thought of writing "Down or Up?" to match the order but, that just sounds wrong.

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  41. I stopped complaining about puzzles a long time ago when Will admitted he doesn't actually solve the puzzles himself - he just looks at the answers. This one stinks:

    -What happens to the missing period ?
    -The opposite of STOP is GO
    -The opposite of ENTER is LEAVE

    Also Saint Peter is typically NOT the subject of the jokes, I would argue it is the person(s) in front of him that are the subject.

    Pedantic lot us puzzlers, hunh ...?

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    1. Dave,
      I just now returned from my bike ride and was going to point out the very same things you posted. Thanks for saving my tired fingers the task. Lego's puzzle description is better than the one we got.

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    2. Indeed, I would not have 'gotten' the 'answer' w/o lego's reinterpretation.
      jan's musical clue helped, too.

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  42. Thanks for that comment, Dave. I thought I was alone in my disappointment at this stupid puzzle.

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  43. I think the directions Will gave were somewhat convoluted and misleading on what the solution would look like.

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    1. Yes, and that is not an uncommon occurrence with the Sunday puzzles. It's not nice to mislead.

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    2. I agree. I know about St. Peter jokes, but I kept thinking about the "subjects" of jokes, such as lawyers, clergy, women, gays, Muslims, racial groups, fat people, doctors, professors, and others, but St. Peter is not the subject of any joke I know of.

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  44. For the record, from top to bottom: L and LA.

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  46. In that last post, read "elephino".

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  47. I stand corrected. St. Peter never even entered my mind. This truly was a challenge. I still don't get what "elephino" has to do with it, unless Blaine was honestly stumped. BTW the answer to my puzzle is. LET IT BE (BELT, TIE). "There will be an answer..."

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    1. 'el(l) pertains to the downside of WW's clue. I tried all week to do something with Cerberus, but got nowhere. Did some eccentric genius,on occasion, use his tie for a belt? I thought it was Einstein, but my research turned up Turing, instead. Maybe neither ...maybe just a story somebody made up.

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    2. That's not quite true about Cerberus. I had something about taking the A train, but it just seemed too convoluted and too much of a stretch.

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    3. You lost me with the 'el and the Hanging A, Paul.

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    4. I lost me when I started typing, WW.

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    5. And the land we belong to is grand.

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  48. Rocks in mah haid.
    Rock translated into Peter

    ...see, mon.
    Simon Peter

    Keyhole to the Zeke dome.
    Keys to the kingdom

    Red light green light
    Stop enter

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    1. I imagined the rocks in your head were your pearly whites.

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  49. Some good clues. I've not heard ANY St. Peter jokes. Maybe it's an age thing? Catholic thing? I went through a TON of lists of joke subjects/people, and that guy never came up. Legol's thing about omitting anything that wasn't a letter made me think "mailman"? Makes sense now.

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    1. Did you try Googling St Peter jokes? I got about 2 million hits.

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    3. Jan, duh?! I would have to have KNOWN about St. Peter and would've had the answer! Talk about a CIRCULAR argument! I was googling "subjects of jokes", etc. It's always easy to find the answer if you KNOW it already!

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  50. I must agree about St. Peter. Every joke I ever heard involving him has focused on the poor unfortunate put before him as the subject. As for the period, I usually disregard punctuation in these puzzles unless they are key parts of it all. Hope next Sunday's puzzle won't be as hard. That night I'm watching the SNL 40th anniversary special. It should be quite interesting, especially with some cast members not having been there in quite a while.

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  51. St. Peter is not the subject of jokes. I wouldn't even say he's a lead-in to a joke. Now George Bush...we could have had fun with that one.

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    1. Or both. Only about 22,00 of those. For example:

      George Bush died and went to heaven and St. Peter met him at the gates. George ask St. Peter if the people in heaven were as friendly as the people in Texas were. St. Peter said, Sure they are. Well George goes for a walk and passes by Moses and decides to speak to him. Moses just looks the other way and keeps on walking. Slightly upset by this, George goes back to St. Peter and tells him what happened with Moses. St. Peter seemed confused so he seeks Moses and ask him why he ignored Mr. Bush. Moses looked St. Peter in the eye and said, Well Peter, if you will remember, the last time I spoke to a Bush I spent 40 years in the wilderness.

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    2. 22,000 or 2,200 ?
      I don't really care; I'm just trying to be a pain in the ass.

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    3. 22,000. At least, that's what I got the last time I tried it. Now, using what I think are the same search terms, I get over 1,000,000. I guess they're getting more popular.

      Einstein dies and goes to heaven. At the Pearly Gates, Saint Peter tells him, "You look like Einstein, but you have NO idea what some people will do to sneak into Heaven. Can you prove who you really are?" Einstein ponders for a few seconds and asks, "Could I have a blackboard and some chalk?" Saint Peter snaps his fingers and a blackboard and chalk instantly appear. Einstein proceeds to describe with arcane mathematics and symbols his theory of relativity. Saint Peter is suitably impressed. "You really ARE Einstein!" he says. "Welcome to heaven!" The next to arrive is Picasso. Once again, Saint Peter asks for credentials. Picasso asks, "Mind if I use that blackboard and chalk?" Saint Peter says, "Go ahead." Picasso erases Einstein's equations and sketches a truly stunning mural with just a few strokes of chalk. Saint Peter claps. "Surely you are the great artist you claim to be!" he says. "Come on in!" Then Saint Peter looks up and sees George W. Bush. Saint Peter scratches his head and says, "Einstein and Picasso both managed to prove their identity. How can you prove yours?" George W. looks bewildered and says, "Who are Einstein and Picasso?" Saint Peter sighs and says, "Come on in, George."

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    4. Oh, I get it! The subject is the blackboard.

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    5. Well, in that case, skydiveboy, what's the object? Huh? Huh?

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    6. The object is to embarrass Will Shortz into providing us with quality puzzles.

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    7. Blackboards are such a black and white issue.

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    8. I overheard FSOG a day or two ago and had to Google it to find out what it meant.

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    9. Paul,
      I had to Google it too. I bet if you happen to live below the Mason-Dixon Line it might seem obvious. But then we living here in Seattle should also know it. I guess even colorful language has its grey areas.

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  52. In don't often post here but have been solving these puzzles for about twenty years and did solve this one.

    My own favorite St Peter joke relates to the arrival of three nuns at the Pearly Gate. St Peter says to them, "Because you were nuns I need to ask each of you a question". To the first nun he asks " Who was the first person created by God" she replies "Adam" he says "Correct, come on in". To the second Nun he asks "who was the second person created by God" she replies "Eve" he says "correct, come on in". He looks at the third Nun and says "You were a Sister Superior so your question is more difficult" he then asks her "What were Eve's first words on seeing Adam". The poor Nun was stunned by this question which had never been the subject of her many years of training and vocation. In despondent resignation she looks St Peter in the eye and says "Gosh -That's a Hard One" to which St Peter replies "Correct come on in"

    As an aside my success rate on the puzzles has been about 98% but as yet, like many of you, I still await an NPR call.

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  53. A robot appears at the Pearly Gates. "What the hell are you doing here?" asks St. Peter. "I'm here to replace you," answers the robot. "Thank God!" says Peter ... and vanishes.

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  54. Monday night after quizzing my son he told back-to-back St. Peter at the gate jokes. I still had to push him along so he could get the answer. Puzzles rock.

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    1. Blind spots. Lego came up with the critical 'auxiliary mirror' this time, I believe.

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    2. I concur. Still waiting for a really funny St Peter, St. Peter, or Saint Peter joke.

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    3. When you read/hear one, please share!

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  55. I was considering hinting at a joke like, if Pearl Bailey married Bill Gates, she'd be....

    I also discovered there was a band, Pearl Harbor and the Explosions, led by Pearl E. Gates.

    But I couldn't think of any non-obvious way of using these.

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    1. So jan, would she be alive or rich? (just kidding)

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  56. A middle aged businessman suddenly found himself standing in line at the pearly gates. Eventually he had his turn and God asked him his name. God looked carefully over his manifest list for the day and told the man his name was not on the list.
    "How did you get here?"
    "I don't know; I just found myself standing in this line."
    "Are you sure you don't belong in the other line? Asked God.
    "I have no idea." Replied the man.
    "Well don't worry about it. Let me just ask you a couple of questions. Have you ever giving anything in my son's name?"
    The man thought carefully for a bit and then replied, "I put a dollar in a collection plate once at a church service I had to attend."
    God said, "Good, a dollar. That's good. Now think very carefully. Have you ever given anything else at any time in my son's name?"
    It took a couple of minutes, but finally the man answered. "Well yes, I donated a dollar to some religious charity once."
    Again God muttered, "Good, a dollar," but was then silent for a couple of minutes.
    Finally after such a long pause Saint Peter, who was standing over to the side, bent over and into God's ear whispered, "God, what are we going to do with this fellow?"
    Got whispered back, "Give him back his two dollars and tell him to go to Hell."

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    1. I meant for the punch line to read:

      "Give him back his two bucks and tell him to go to Hell."

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  57. Regarding the subject of subjects, I think that grammatically St. Peter is the subject of many jokes, but the object (or butt) of few. For example, in the sentence "St. Peter met the nun", St. Peter is the subject and the nun is the object. In Websters, the appropriate definition of butt is "an object of abuse or ridicule", not "a subject ...".

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    1. Are you saying the nun wasn't subject to ridicule? I think yours is an apple and oranges argument. I've never walked into a bar and thought the bartender was the subject; perhaps the lawyer and he three clergymen were though, not to mention the termite.

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  58. I think you may be confusing the definition of subject as a noun with the definition of subject as a verb.

    In the sentence "St. Peter ridiculed the nun" St. Peter is the subject (noun) and the nun is the object (noun), and so yes, the nun was subject (verb) to ridicule.

    In the clue for the puzzle, "Name someone who's the subject of many jokes ...", subject is being used as a noun and not as a verb, and indeed St. Peter is the subject (noun) of many jokes of which other people (nuns, for example) are the objects (noun).

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  59. Next week's challenge: Name a major U.S. city in two syllables. Reverse the syllables phonetically to get the cost of attending a certain NBA game. What is it?

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    1. Maybe his easiest one of all.

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    2. No need to worry about a lane violation.

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    3. *yawn* Now I've got "Witchita Lineman" in my head

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  60. From Legolambda, Feb10, 6:15:
    "I should use that as a motto for Puzzleria! You have to create puzzles with answers that make people smile, or say, 'Of course!' Not easy to do."

    Amply proven by this week's challenge. My response was, as well, a simple two word phrase. It was not "Of course!". And I was not smiling.

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    1. Say what?

      Only 80 correct responses and the person playing for 3 weeks is chosen.

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    2. I thought that was hilarious.

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  61. A very appropriate Sunday puzzle! And will's challenge even has a clue within it!

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    1. Good obsevation, Snipper. And when you tally the letters in the clue word they come up just one letter short of a bird.

      Lego8,000CorrectAnswersNextWeek

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  62. I wonder about the genesis of this puzzle

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  63. Between the city name and the cost, only 3 letters in common! Moreover, one of those letters, in one of its uses is silent!

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    1. Uh, scratch my last clue. But in one of the answer parts, I see we have a curious case of "when two vowels go walking, the second one does the talking"!

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  64. Guess who was born in this city.

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  65. Paul, were you a guest at that dinner too?

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    1. I suppose there have been a lot of births in this city, Ruth. We may be thinking of different people.

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