Sunday, September 13, 2015

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Sep 13, 2015): The Quick Brown Fox...

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Sep 13, 2015): The Quick Brown Fox...:
Q: It's a well-known curiosity that the longest common unhyphenated word that can be typed on the top row of a typewriter or computer keyboard is TYPEWRITER.

Find a common hyphenated word in 12 letters that can be typed using only the keys on the top row of a typewriter or computer keyboard.
And a synonym of the word can be typed with one hand.

Edit: You can type SEESAW with the left hand.
A: TEETER-TOTTER

172 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. I have an answer and now am going back to bed, but I will append this when I get up later.

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  3. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    1. I am sorry, Blaine - I thought it was subtle enough, but I guess not. ---Rob

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  4. Pity, W. put out our petty pout. Pure torture, quiet power.

    I guarantee the correct answer is contained using the letters above.

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  5. I don't think "Europe-proper" is a legitimate answer.

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  6. Now that you've solved this puzzle, try this quiz about Political Bias. The results and especially the links in the article are quite interesting. Enjoy!

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    1. Kind of fun, though I have to quibble with some of the questions, like whether renewable energy increased by 0, 1, or 2% over the last 4 years. You have to be a real energy wonk to know that, hardly a question of political bias.

      I don't know about their "consensus", I've read things that take quite a different view. And some of the questions are ambiguously worded.

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    2. Agreed, ecoarchitect, though I think quibbling is part of their point. . .as is ambiguous wording.

      It was the only time I was happy to get 0% (for political bias). I do try to listen to both sides. . .

      Willing to share your political bias score?

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    3. I can't remember exactly, I didn't get it emailed and I moved on from that site. I think I was less biased than 60% of respondents.

      I still maintain the difference between 0, 1 and 2% is so slight that it's not a reasonable question. And whether the US is wealthier than most or nearly all EU countries - when does most become nearly all? And how does one account for wealth, gross income or net income after spending for health care and education? And are we talking about average income or median income - if Bill Gates were to join this group the average income would zoom upwards, median not so much.

      Ironically but not surprisingly I did worst on environmental issues. I take issue with several of their "answers", like whether spent nuclear fuel can be stored safely - I wrote my first paper on energy futures in the 5th grade, and that was long, long ago. But I suppose that's the point of the exercise.

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    4. All good points, ecoarchitect. Yes, it starts a conversation worth having.

      As to "long, long ago" I laughed heartily when the woman talking on NPR this morning said about her updated honey cake recipe said "It will last forever, for weeks and weeks." Even if I weren't a geologist, those two periods of time are pretty darn far apart.

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    5. She was making her recipe to celebrate the creation of the world 5776 years ago. Not so very long ago at all!

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    6. Twinkies last forever, even on geological time.

      But they aren't cakes. Or food.

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    7. Indeed. . .remove the second "said" above, please.

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    8. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    9. Jan, I do have to note that while tonight marks the start of the New Year in the Hebrew calendar, I have yet to meet a rabbi or Jewish lay person who believes that the universe was created 5776 years ago. They are out there, but a small minority.

      Even in the Middle Ages (while most thought the world was flat and the sun circled the earth) scholars agreed that the use of the terms "day" and "week" were metaphorical, and the scriptures were not to be taken literally, and/or that there exist time periods that are different than human comprehension. Intriguing that in the 1200's Rabbi Isaac of Akko estimated the universe to be 15 billion years old - not far off from the scientific consensus of today.

      Lord, forgive my atheism.

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    10. Eco, doesn't the Hebrew colander have a lot of holes in it?

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    11. Oh, they're out there, all right. I have a brother who's a rabbi, and who's part of that (alas, growing) minority. He believes that God put dinosaur bones in the ground a few thousand years ago to test our faith.

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    12. jan:

      I am not Jewish, but I know this is a common belief among Christian fundies. I first heard the dinosaur bit from my youngest brother who, BTW, oddly enough is also not Jewish, had a friend who believes that.

      Next time you speak with your brother, ask him how prevalent the teaching of reincarnation is in some forms of Judaism. I bet he will fly off the handle and insist it is not taught at all. It is though.

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    13. SDB: my colander is indeed a Holy Vessel.

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    14. eco, I bet were you to place your "Holy Vessel" colander into a pool of deep water it would become a sub-sidiary. But I hope you won't leak that information.

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    15. Let's not go there, 'tis a Farfalle.

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    16. That's using your noodle, ecoarchitect!

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    17. jan, I took a look at the photo from your link. What I would like to know is how they came to colander?

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    18. a Penne for your thoughts, eco.

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    19. Livin' just enough for the ziti.

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    20. I suppose the time for these puns has pasta. Oh well, we could get in touch with Linn Guini tomorrow and inquire.

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  7. Blaine's synonym, is sometimes hyphenated. But it depends on usage.

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  8. There was some breaking local news that blocked the first part of today's program. Can anyone summarize for me how Shortz dealt with last week's SNAFU?

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    1. He acknowledged the official name is Denali, but that "Mount" was a popular usage.

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    2. MJ:
      You can go online and listen at your leisure. He said it was popular or common usage, but that is nonsense. I have NEVER heard it other than simply Denali.

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    3. See: MOUNT DENALI. As I said last week, DENALI is not always & everywhere a one-word MOUNT.

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    4. ron:
      I don't accept Examiner.com as a valid news source. Nor do I accept Fox News as a valid news source, but it is the only reference Examiner.com used. And still what does this report have to do with it being common or popular usage? Even valid news sources get their facts wrong all the time.

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    5. Of course, I am not saying the two-word designation is a "common or popular usage." Now you have heard it other than simply Denali... is all I am saying...

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    6. I vacillate regarding whether last week's puzzle should have even been used or not. It had such a downside I think.

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    7. Natasha:
      Is it Vacillate or Mount Vacillate? Oh, and where is it located exactly?

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    8. SDB: Reminds me of Through the Looking Glass when Humpty Dumpty said: 'When I use a word,' Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, 'it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.'

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    9. Natasha,
      I have a recommendation for you. The B&W 1966 film by Jonathan Miller, with an all star cast of Alice in Wonderland. It is only one hour and twelve minutes, but you will never forget it. Don't vacillate, you have a very important date.

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    10. SDB: I will try to see it. Thanks.

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    11. Like the rabbit ....Have a very important date!! Got it!

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  9. I solved this puzzle and I feel GREAT!

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  10. I see that Blaine removed my comment at the end of last week's blog. But I don't know what he saw in it that was such a giveaway.

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    1. Honestly, jan, you remind me of the Cookie Monster protesting his innocence with a face full of crumbs.
      [I've just been listening to Frank Oz playing "Not My Job" over at the NPR site.]

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    2. That's good enough for me!

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    3. Paul, I had a similar thought. . .but thought we might say honey cake in honor of the new year at sunset. . .

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    4. Jan,
      It may be some consolation that your deleted hint did not lead me to the answer but instead to seeking an opposite of Denali, something related to the equity markets and a detailed analysis of a certain nursery rhyme!

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    5. Jan,
      I think what happened was; Blaine had been stumped up until he saw your hint, and YOUR HINT helped him figure out the answer! I believe he does NOT FORGIVE you for that.

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    6. Perhaps the opposite. I had the solution fresh in my mind and that clue seemed too descriptive. If I didn't have the answer, perhaps it wouldn't have seemed a giveaway.

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  11. If you go to Wikipedia and start to type the 12-letter hyphenated word into the search box, when you've typed in everything before the hyphen, a selection box of your possible entries will have appeared and what you're typing is the second thing on the list, except the parts are separated by a SPACE, not a hyphen! Type the hyphen and continue, and you continue to see your intended entry in the suggestion box, but STILL separated by SPACE, NOT a hyphen!

    When you've finished typing your answer WITH THE HYPHEN, you'll find yourself redirected to Blaine's 6-letter synonym!

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  12. How careful do we have to be with our hints, when you can type the puzzle question into Google without alteration, and get the answer directly?

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    1. It's like scrolling through a certain news feed, jan: "like this, like that. . ."

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    2. Will did make the point last week that it's very hard to craft puzzles that can't be short-circuited by Google.

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    3. . . .or other search engines like duckduckgo.com . . .

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    4. I just wanted folks to click on the Google link I provided. Speaks volumes.

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    5. It does speak volumes. It's part of why I (and Ron and Lego) keep bringing up duckduckgo.com. (Last time this week, I promise)

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    6. Cute, but outdated, Borgle graphic. MY wife was amused to learn that the kind of lower-case "g" in the old logo is called a "binocular g".

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  13. Jessica Vandervelt (spelling?) was this week's NPR on-air contestant. It was the first time she sent in an entry! NPR taped her segment from her middle school classroom, where she teaches. Her students yelled a greeting, and can all now say they were on national radio.

    I predict that one of her students will someday be an on-air contestant and will say, "This is actually my second time on the NPR puzzle segment. I was a middle school student in Ms. Vandervelt's class etc. etc....

    I note that one of Will's clues for the on-air puzzle was not "CRY PER IRK." WS did take great delight in his Carly Fiorina = California + RY anagram, with R standing for Republican and Y standing for whatever. Too bad her brother-in-law Cal is not a candidate. You can tell that anagrams are in Will's blood. He was genuinely tickled by his Carly coup. Good for him.

    LegoIHaveNoIdeaIfMs.FiorinaHasABrother-in-lawNamedCal

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    1. I got the impression that the segment was heavily edited because Jessica and class were having 'way' too much fun ... and good for them1

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    2. Good for the kids, but she will be fired by the end of next week for interrupting her class. I expect Donald Trump to make it a huge issue an insist she be fired.

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    3. She could just tell admin it was part of test prep. I understand that's all they do in school now.

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    4. I wouldn't know, eco. Here in Seattle the teachers are on strike. It occurred to me this afternoon that it is okay for your teachers to strike, but not okay for you to strike your teachers. Smacks of a double standard if you ask me.

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    5. Sounds like an old George Carlin line.

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    6. Ah, the old George Carlin Line. I think it went out of business but the Cunard Line is still hanging in there. The old White Star Line is gone too.

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  14. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  15. Is PRIORITY-QUEUE at 13 letters not common enough?

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    1. You might want to ask James Bond that question?

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    2. No, but PRIORITY-ROUTE is more common.

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    3. Anyone who owns, operates, and performs in a 'Punch and Judy' show is a PUPPETEER-PROPRIETOR (or a PROPRIETOR-PUPPETEER) and I don't expect to hear another word on the subject!

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    4. He must have a large PUPPETEER-REPERTOIRE...

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    5. PROPPER-PEOPLE-PUPPETEER-PROPERTY-POOPER!

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    6. The L you say! How did I miss that one?

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    7. Hey, he does have a PROPERTY-RITE.

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    8. It was still PRETTY-POOR-WRIT.

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    9. Wow, I really did not mean to start something that ended up with "poop"

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  16. He's a TOP-TIER-REPORTER from an OUTER-TERRITORY.

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    1. Not a RE-ROUTER-POUTER.-PREPPY.

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    2. Of course, Tarzan liked to travel _______-__-_______

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  17. I'm getting key-bored and am going for a walk.

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  18. One thing I DON'T LIKE about the new submission form, the automatic email-acknowledgement no longer QUOTES your submission. Anybody besides me misses that?

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    1. I noticed that omission and wonder why it was deleted.

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    2. To retain a record of your submission,either send it as an email message to yourself or save it in WORD to your flash drive.

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  19. It's a pity PARTY-POOPER is one letter off and includes an A. Hester Prynne's curse, I guess. As for the actual answer, I am reminded of a line from a 1969 song. The song itself does not allude to the answer exactly, though.

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  20. At first I was uncertain as to which way to go, but I finally got it.

    Chuck

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  21. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  22. After all of us get off of the "Pitty Potty" We might see the point that WS was making on this "blog" last week., Hopefully we all saw what he was trying to say? Am hoping that it gets better?

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    1. I know what WS said, but I have no idea what you are saying. However, I will say that my fingers don't really have the energy to go deeper into it now after I just consumed a full crumb cake and am stuffed to the point of.........

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  23. After I went for groceries, it came to me.

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    1. I'll bet you live in the Southeast.

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    2. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  24. Sorry, Blaine. I just can't resist those ... uh, grocery products. I've even enjoyed them in a Wyoming gentleman's club, while wearing a threadbare ballet outfit.

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    1. Watch out, WW: Blaine's exercising control over his playground this week!

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    2. Maybe he's trying to be fair, and balanced.

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  25. I am pretty sure the answer I have this week is the one Shortz wants.
    I know this because it is flawed: spelling it with a hyphen, as one word or as two are easily found in print and cyber sources. If he had done the most rudimentary reserach, he would have discovered this, but probably would not have cared.

    Last week's fiasco was worse by far, probably surpassing even the infamous insoluble challenge of several years ago.
    When it came time to explain that bomb, he complained how hard it had been on him, but never apologized to those (a larger number then) who had spent an increasingly desparate several days trying to solve it.

    Last week, he either knew there was no answer when Ben Bass supplied the puzzle and went ahead anyway or he discovered it later and did not have the fortitude to admit it.
    In the final analysis there was no correct answer: "Denali" is one word without the demanded assortment of vowels and there simply is no "Mount Denali."
    So there were two mistakes, some likely dissembling and still no apology.

    We should not forget he provided a hint to this forum that violated the do-not-give-away rules, but not to other forums or to players that do without them.

    People ask me why I attend the Weekly Puzzle (and have for 15 years or so) if Will Shortz pisses me off so badly.
    Partly because, as he said in his Manifesto last week, it is my (our) puzzle after all, even if he so frequently disappoints..
    I (we) also pay his salary (in a secret amount), through taxes and memberships in local NPR outlets.

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    Replies
    1. My continuing disappointment with this never-ending deluge of crappy puzzles is also causing me to question my further participation and my decision is hanging in the balance. Were it not for this blog the scales would have been tipped long ago.

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    2. To quote Norm MacDonald: " Disappointers never disappoint"

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  26. I'm not trying to apologize for the puzzle, but I think we all need a little perspective here. Is this really that important?

    I can't say last week's was a complete fiasco, I suspect many (most) of the folks on this forum came up with the intended solution pretty quickly, and ranged from rage to annoyance to shrugs in their dealing with the inconsistency. It is a significant insult to the indigenous people of the region, otherwise for me it's a minor insult to correct usage.

    Beyond that I can't take the whole thing so seriously; it's a puzzle, you like it or you don't. I'm still enraged over the bunny/ hare = honey bear incident, but at least I've stopped punching my stuffed Teddy.

    Will's acknowledgement "that the answer officially goes by a one-word name" was not much different than Blaine's original comment "isn't the name of this place a single word?", so I don't think he violated the rules any more than our host.

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    1. While I thought the Denali puzzle was way substandard, I still solved it almost instantly even though I have never heard it called Mt. Denali. What upsets me most about it being stated that way is Will Shortz's sophomoric apology for using it when it is clearly wrong when he said it was common usage. No one ever uses it that way! How's that for hyperbole?

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    2. Very hyperbolic. This article in Wikipedia uses the term "Mount Denali" in talking about the renaming in the 1970's. It's Wikipedia, it must be true.

      And a quick duckduckgo.com search (happy WW?) cites recent articles from ABC, US News & World Report, and the CBC using those terms. And at least 1 of those is semi-legitimate.

      I still think of the puzzle like anything else of which I'm a fan. If I like what they're doing I pay attention and cheer them on, if not I let that drop into the second tier of my conscience, or stop paying attention entirely.

      How are my beloved Washington Senators doing this year?

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    3. Yes, ecoarchitect, your use of duckduckgo.com as a search engine made me happy. Whoops! I did it again ;-).

      Perhaps it is the teacher/parent in me that sees every experience as a chance to learn new things, make new connections, AND, to say "Yup, I blew it on this one." My kindergarten students and my own kids enjoy and enjoyed it when experiments or other things went awry and I could laugh (or cry) and say "Whoops!" That's all I want to say. Thanks for reading, fellow humans.

      De Nada, Denali? No, De Todo.

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    4. I forgot to mention this virtual tailgate party makes the puzzles more enjoyable, whether good, bad, or in between

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    5. ecoarchitect, who is bringing the beer and brats this week?

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    6. you've got the brats, but you'll lose your job if you bring them together with the beer.

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    7. Ah, but brats come in all ages. . .

      Speaking of bee-r, the octogenarian rockhound friend we visited yesterday in the hills put out a platter of honey to attract the bees and keep them away from rock afficianados at his outdoor liquidating rock sale. It was close enough to sundown to ask "Oh, are they Jewish bees?" ;-)

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    8. What made you think they weren't WASPs?

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    9. SuperZee, that thought crossed my mind but I chose to be PC. (RC?)

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    10. Doc Severinsen would have just the right tune for this occasion.

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  27. I vacationed this Season Summer in Peninsula Florida.

    Chuck

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    Replies
    1. Hope you didn't have to panhandle to afford your vacation....

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  28. BTW, Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary Eleventh Edition – which I believe is Will’s word bible – lists this week’s word only as a hyphenated word, not as an unhyphenated word.

    Chuck

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  29. I am surprised no one has mentioned The Moody Blues as a musical clue yet.

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    Replies
    1. "Bloggers I've written, never meaning to send???

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    2. A couple of their songs, actually.

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    3. It's been a while, so I listened to some Moody Blues yesterday (Tuesday Afternoon). They remind me of the mainstream media today: lots of puff pieces.

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  30. This back and forth is getting us nowhere. I can imagine the mountain saying to Will, "from now on I am Mr. Denali (or Ms.) to you. Nanny Nanny BooBoo

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    1. Double trouble, RoRo Good to see you back here, as always.

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  31. This back and forth is getting us nowhere. I can imagine the mountain saying to Will, "from now on I am Mr. Denali (or Ms.) to you. Nanny Nanny BooBoo

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  32. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    1. No problem: "dash" uses only letters from the middle row.

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    2. Natasha,
      YES! It matters a lot! If you have a keyboard with the hyphen on the wrong row you should return it for one that has it in the proper place. Otherwise it may slow down your typing.

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    3. In Colorado they'd say Boulder-dash

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  33. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  34. TEETER-TOTTER

    My Hints:

    “I have an answer and now am going back to bed, but I will append this when I get up later.” APPEND is hinting at UPEND.

    “…I just consumed a full crumb cake and am stuffed to the point of.........” FULL CRUMB cake is hinting at FULCRUM. A teeter-totter is a common example of how to demonstrate a fulcrum.

    “Were it not for this blog the scales would have been tipped long ago.” Another hint at a fulcrum and balance scales being similar to a teeter-totter.

    “I am surprised no one has mentioned The Moody Blues as a musical clue yet.” RIDE MY SEE-SAW.

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  35. TEETER-TOTTER

    > [Deleted comment] When he's up, he up. And when he's down, he's down.

    A comment on Will's puzzle quality.

    > I see that Blaine removed my comment at the end of last week's blog. But I don't know what he saw in it that was such a giveaway.

    > How careful do we have to be with our hints, when you can type the puzzle question into Google without alteration, and get the answer directly?

    Let me Google that for you

    Garry Rust wrote "After I went for groceries, it came to me."

    To which, I replied:

    > I'll bet you live in the Southeast.

    followed by:

    > ... And did you buy any frozen, deep-fried grated potato products at the grocery?

    ... which Blaine deleted! I responded:

    > Sorry, Blaine. I just can't resist those ... uh, grocery products. I've even enjoyed them in a Wyoming gentleman's club, while wearing a threadbare ballet outfit.

    Have you tasted Harris-Teeter's Tater Tots in a Teton titty bar, in a tattered tutu?

    > Watch out, WW: Blaine's exercising control over his playground this week!

    So, a playground reference is OK, but "frozen, deep-fried grated potato products" are verboten?

    >> Clever observation, Blaine!!
    > He's a clever one, lass!

    ... who would never permit mention of a class one lever.

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  36. teeter-totter

    Last Sunday I said, “At first I was uncertain as to which way to go but I finally got it.” Uncertain as to which way to go – I teeter-tottered.

    Chuck

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  37. TEETER-TOTTER

    Synonym using only your left hand on a standard keyboard: SEESAW.

    Incidentally, TYPEWRITER is not the ONLY ten-letter word that can be typed using only the top row of letters on a standard keyboard. There are, as already posted: PROPRIETOR, REPERTOIRE, and others.

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  38. When I was a kid we had a swingset in the back-yard something like the one in this picture, but without the sliding board. We always called the gadget at the far left a teeter-totter. Some might prefer to refer to it as a double-swing or tandem swing. Teeter-totter swing also seems to be in 'common usage', believe it or not!

    Archimedes invented the see-saw, right? (btw, I type practically everything with one hand (1/5 of a hand, actually))

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Paul!
      Are you giving us the finger?

      Delete
    2. Oh yeah, I knew I was forgetting something:
      I thought Tarzan traveled treetop-to-treetop, but I suppose he didn't always go to the tippity-top of every tree.

      Delete
    3. Yes, Tarzan had a vine way of beginning his day.

      Delete

  39. TEETER-TOTTER

    "What's your point?" to jan's deleted comment refers to the fulcrum of a teeter-totter.

    "French" refers to "comme ci, comme ca," the origin of see-saw.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And,

      "Like this, like that" = comme ci, comme ca, encore.

      Delete
    2. THE ETYMOLOGY OF SEESAW has nothing to do with comme çi comme ça.

      Delete
  40. My hint about getting the answer after grocery shopping, referred to Harris Teeter grocery.

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  41. A tweeter-totter (or twitter-totter) counts tweets.
    A Tipper-topper is Ms. Gore's wig... no, not Leslie Gore. That would be a Leslie-lier, or Leslie-liar.
    A weeper-peeper is an eye of a lachrymose cyclops. A wetter-peeper may also result from consuming a hot pepper-popper.

    LegoNowAQuitterAsAQuipper

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  42. TEETER-TOTTER
    1969's "Spinning Wheel" by Blood, Sweat, and Tears begins "What goes up must come down".

    ReplyDelete
  43. I do think "Ride My Seesaw" by the Moody Blues would have been a good clue, depending upon your knowledge of their hits. Some might think it would give the whole thing away. When the band was mentioned on this blog earlier, I didn't make the connection.

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  44. I wrote "Pure torture, quiet power.". Apparently there was an early video game called Teeter Torture, I only discovered that after posting.

    Quiet power was my reference to the wonderful community of Gaviotas, in Colombia, where the children's teeter-totter (or see saw) pumps water in that dry region. May not be so quiet if the kids are laughing.

    And sorry if I was a little cranky about our priorities. The big wildfires are a bit distressing, one project under construction is in the "red" zone, and may be gone, and the second strawbale house I did is in the line of fire, which is moving closer every day. At the time I didn't know my clients' status, but they are all okay.

    We need more quiet power and water pumping.

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  45. I am surprised that there is no mention here that teeter-totter can be spelled using the letters of the top row but not the keys (as specified), since the hyphen is on the next row up.
    I would have made this comment to the NPR folks if I could have opened the page.
    Someone probably did and we will have to wait and see if Willy Boy mentions it. Wanna bet?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Small technicality, the top row of a typewriter DOES include the hyphen, it also includes `1234567890=, and all the shiftiness above.

      Makes it harder to take a Shining to this puzzle. Now Jack goes back to work.

      Of course the keyboard has a bunch of F's along the top row, I leave it to others to come up with the appropriate F-word.

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    2. Didn't Dr. Ruth frequently talk about the hyphen?

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    3. Mendo Jim, I did comment about the hyphen being in a different row. I did not think the replies I got thought it mattered so I deleted it.

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    4. Just think of the hyphen as a fulcrum.

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  46. How about Power-tripper? It also rhymes with Snipper.

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  47. Yeah, and my PRETTY PUTTER, Never made my Golf Game any Better? Maybe Snipper's POWER PUTTER would have helped ..Please Will, give us something better??

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  48. The new Puzzleria! is up -- four current-event puzzles plus a Mt. Holympus Greek mytheology puzzle!

    Lego...

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  49. "Small technicality"
    Downright scary in architecture, I would think, and self-defeating in enigmatology,

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    1. Small technicalities aren't the scary part.

      I've... seen things... you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion; I watched c-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate... All those... moments... will be lost, in time, like tears... in... rain.

      Time... to die.

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  50. Next week's challenge: Take the words FORETOLD and FOURFOLD. They start with homophones, FORE and FOUR, and they end with rhymes, TOLD and FOLD. The challenge is to find two common nine-letter compound words that have the same property. Specifically, the two homophones are each five letters long, and the rhymes have four letters each. What words are these?

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  51. X hop'x iiew tada o ioarj rsnhvrrtlbahj kehy wzxw opi. L xhtvc B'hz fijw odvk cx lx a mql tp o pwdh.

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    1. Paul,

      I suspect that your key starts with "peace" and that your message starts with "I don't...", but I haven't gotten any further with that. Any clues?

      Delete
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  54. I don't hate this puzzle, but I could get to that place pretty easily.

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