Sunday, November 22, 2015

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Nov 22, 2015): Happy Thanksgiving

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Nov 22, 2015): Happy Thanksgiving:
Q: The following three Thanksgiving dishes have something very unusual in common:

  • Spit-roast turkey
  • Cornbread stuffing
  • Boiled squash
  • What is it they have in common, and can you name one other thing that might be served at Thanksgiving dinner that has the same property?
    Well, it isn't Baked Alaska.

    Edit: My hint was a callback to the recent (MOUNT) DENALI puzzle. The food I submitted was the simple CAULIFLOWER.
    A: Each food item uses all five vowels (A, E, I, O and U) exactly once. Other possible foods with this property: Whipped young yams, cranberry coulis, pumpkin gelato, robust Zinfandel. Any food whose name contained all five vowels exactly once was accepted.

    219 comments:

    1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Wednesday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

      You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Wednesday deadline. Thank you.

      ReplyDelete
    2. And it's also not cranberry muffins (though I think it comes close). --Margaret G.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. I love those when they have just come out of the oven.

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    3. An unusually easy one, indeed. You might find the (slightly) harder part finding that other item on the menu, but I did find a one-word possibility.

      I hope all the friends here have a wonderful Thanksgiving.

      ---Rob

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      Replies
      1. Yep, one word will do. At least that's what I served as the answer, to the NPR website.

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      2. My answer is one word also.

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      3. Yes, there IS a one word perfect answer! I used to HATE this thing as a kid, but when having a Thanksgiving dinner at my now ex-girlfriend's Grandmother's around 2006 or so she served a dish of this and it was FANTASTIC! I guess it's all in the seasonings, etc. Have a great holiday everyone!

        Delete
    4. Just waiting for the deft language-butchers to get started now.

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    5. This puzzle was way too easy, and I'm sure I've heard it, or it's ilk before. It has a lot of nerve even calling itself a challenge!
      No respect at all...

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    6. Didn't American Indians serve sautéd bison to give thanks...

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    7. Canadian Thanksgiving dinner may include a poutine. Has anyone here tried that dish?

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. No, poutine has never entered my eating routine.

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      2. I think someone's poutine on the Ritz.

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      3. Isn't Outro one of old Audi models from the 80s?

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      4. I've had poutine. I've also had a roast duck poutine pizza, at Bannock, in Toronto. Gotta love Canada!

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      5. I take it you liked poutine, jan?


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      6. Well, I didn't appreciate it when Prime Minister Jean Poutine endorsed Dubya for President.. And despite his alliance with them in bombing ISIS, the French still refer to the Russian President as Vladimir Poutine, so no, I'm not that big a fan. But freedom fries, cheese curds, brown gravy and roast duck on a pizza? C'mon, ya gotta admire their intestinal fortitude, at least.

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      7. True.

        Gastronomic uses and history for Poutine.

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    8. I'm not very thankful for this puzzle.

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    9. Is it really that easy? It's so simple, I'm worried I may be wrong. If, indeed I'm right, I'm reminded of a fun, fruity song I sang as a kid...

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. My favorite, Green bean casserole, doesn't make the cut.

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      2. Always hated it, especially with the onions.

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      3. Have you ever had it made entirely from scratch? It tastes so much better.

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    10. I found four foods that share the same property as the three listed in the puzzle. I submitted the most common of them and the one I thought most likely to be served at Thanksgiving dinner.

      This is so simple I think we must be getting time off for good behavior :)

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Although to Brits, it's behaviour, eh, Chuck?

        I shall be bringing some of this dish in lieu of certain potatoes.

        Happy Thanksgiving to all of you.

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    11. Got it, although to my ear, it doesn't sound like something that would be served at Thanksgiving.

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    12. I’ve reviewed some of my recent posts and found them to be somewhat flippant and obscure. In the spirit of Thanksgiving and the ensuing holidays, I will try to do better. Leaving soon to visit my relatives in Redwood City, CA. Hope the weather is a little nicer there than it is here in the east. Happy Thanksgiving to all. Regards – Phil J.

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    13. Phil J. is such a polite gentleman. I'm just a brusque, supercilious amanuensis.

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    14. I imagine Julia Child cooked some wonderful Thanksgiving dinners at La Pitchoune.

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    15. Easy as pie (mmm, pie...). I found the one-word answer; one could conceivably serve this food at Thanksgiving, or any other time of the year. And, it reminds me of a Simon and/or Garfunkel song.

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    16. The modern model of Thanksgiving followed in the 19th century served up heaping portions of prayer and fasting.

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    17. I'm going away for Thanksgiving. I don't need this. I give up(and that's no hint).

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Don't be discouraged, think of your reputation.

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      2. My reputation is assured. I just have too much on my mind, with packing and everything. It's not every year I go out of state for the holidays. The answer just isn't as obvious to me as it probably is to you. Plus, I'm still struggling with an archaic word in one of the Puzzleria! puzzles. Legolambda can certainly vouch for me. Dare I say I have too much on my plate at this time.

        Delete
      3. Yes indeedy, I certainly can and will vouch for patjberry! He unfailingly flails away at and chows down on our puzzles over on Puzzleria! with gustatory delight… which, coincidentally, is the name my great Aunt Monica gave to her Thanksgiving Day specialty: a hot dish casserole (redundant!) with just five ingredients: uglifruit, artichokes, olives, eggplant, and imitation crabmeat.
        It was delish!

        LegoSometimesShe’dTossInAYamOrTwo(ButNeverASalad!)

        Delete
    18. Oh how I long for the days of Lego's Crossroads Diner...
      (where the chickens sometimes just didn’t make it… and we passed the savings on to you!)

      LegoButAlasTheyClosedItDownAndSomeSeedyPuzzleriaJointMovedIn!

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      Replies
      1. I could go for a Soy Danish Cruller about now. But I'll settle for a nice donut.

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      2. Ah yes, Paul. Crullers and especially donuts (do nut spell it doughnuts!), those glorious toruses of the gods! Yet are we not but reliving long past repasts of pastries, pasties and passion fruit.?

        Yes, we are. Still, I can recall it as if it were only about 19 months ago!

        LegoWhoLikesToCallHisSentimentallyProustianLongingAndWistfulAffectionForRemembranceOfEdibleThingsPast...Noshtalgia!

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    19. I thought of about half a dozen additional menu items listening to the Seattle Symphony play Mahler's 10th symphony.

      I might also say that one of Will's menu items has more in common than the other two, but I'm not going to tell you why.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. One has more in common than two.
        Vaguely reminds me of Animal Farm.

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    20. I guess one could serve arsenic roux to the mother-in-law.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. That roux might bring forth her abstemious ways, Ken.

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    21. Once when I was a guest at Timothy Leary's Thanksgiving Day dinner, he served us sea bream and mushrooms seasoned with nutmeg.

      LegoAndForDessertHeServedHis"Special"Brownies!

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    22. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    23. In the Holiday spirit of fun, and with the writing of another computer program I came up with many answers that fit this puzzle although most were not very realistic! A few that I liked and thought were funny, I will share after Wednesday, but here are four clues to four of the answers that I liked. What might the Beverly Hillbillies, rednecks, 1980s yuppies, and a hunter in a fantasy world possibly be having for Thanksgiving dinner?

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. I'd be willing to reply here with some answers, but any answers which would be correct for your puzzle here, would also be correct, albeit unusual, for the MAIN puzzle here!

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    24. Does the answer have to be a main course?

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      Replies
      1. A side course works also, yes?

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      2. Actually, a side course doesn't work, does it?

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      3. Apologies to my Uncle Sidney: A Sid Course.

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      4. Tell him not to overeat, or he might have A Sid Reflux.

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      5. Who brought up one-upmanship, jan?!

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      6. That was a clue, not a critique.

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      7. This comment has been removed by the author.

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      8. My proposed menu, currently at 16 items, includes initial courses, main dishes, side dishes, desserts, and a condiment.

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      9. jan, oh I know. I was being facetious.

        (If you don't have it by now. . .).

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      10. WW - I wanted to say your comment was out of order, but it isn't.

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      11. There'a always room for something gelatinous for dessert.

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      12. ... or else.... a tongue-lashing?

        Delete
    25. Musical clue: Hey Mr. Tambourine Man.

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    26. How about sweet potato pumpkin pie?

      ReplyDelete
    27. Replies
      1. You and Philly Cinephile, Ralph Loizzo.

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    28. This is the same menu as I served for my Fall Equinox party.

      ReplyDelete
    29. I have a 3-word answer that I shouldn't have to drum up support for.

      ReplyDelete
    30. I think FINGER BOWLS is a fitting side dish that also qualifies, but I doubt WS would accept it.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. And I don't think he'll accept SEASONING RUB either.

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      2. I'm making vegan sushi rolls, I don't care if WS accepts it or not, they're delicious.

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      3. I've never had a problem with raw vegetables ... just sayin'.

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      4. I don't really get the sayin' versus saying thing, Paul.

        Yo, elucidate?

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      5. Jus' tryin' to sound cool.

        Busted.

        as it were

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      6. But, seriously, there is a vegetable, which, in its raw state I find enormously scrumptious, and is alright cooked ...

        Ah, the light just came on.

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      7. Enunciation is uncool!? Is that what you're sayingg, Paul?

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      8. Just to clarify (and sound very uncool), vegan sushi rolls can have cooked veggies - I can't imagine eggplant uncooked, mushrooms taste better cooked, I've done asparagus both raw and cooked. Most of the other veggies I use (avocado, carrots, sweet peppers, cukes, etc. stay raw.

        I think Paul's veg would not go well with sushi.

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      9. But, eco, isn't ketchup Amerika's favorite vegetable? I've never seen it served as a dish though. Maybe I'll work with Marilyn Monroe. Talk about a dish!

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      10. That's Paul's vegg, right, eco?

        I prefer raw mushrooms but the rest of your vegan sushi sounds great. If it has firmish avocado in it, you can't go wrong.

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      11. Paul's still in the room; I hope y'all realize that.

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      12. Thank you for that appalling news.

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      13. Pall has never tried sushi.
        Pall doesn't really want to.
        Nevertheless, Paul thinks his raw veggie would complement anything.

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      14. Obama is not only a pol who likes sushi, he's a pol who is sushi!

        Delete
      15. This comment has been removed by the author.

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      16. skydiveboy: you'll have to explain how "finger bowls" works.

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    31. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    32. Arugula & Lemon Oil Dressing will keep them coming back for seconds.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. I believe in God
        And I believe that God
        Believes in Claude
        That's me

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      2. David:
        When I serve Hot Buttered Rum drinks with my homemade batter they keep coming back for hours.

        Delete
    33. No one so far has mentioned a commontater dish.

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    34. This has nothing to do with the puzzle.

      Just a note for no discernible reason, but to say I just now, not more than two minutes ago, finished reading a book for the second time. I have never done that before. It is, Tales of the South Pacific, by James A. Michener. I first read it over fifty years ago. If you have not read it, you should. It won the Pulitzer.

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      Replies
      1. I've always enjoyed Michener, but I've never read that one. BTW, most of his novels are too long for me to read twice...

        Delete
      2. Curtis,
        Tales of the South Pacific is the one that got him started and you will be very glad when you read it. It is nothing at all like the musical or film. A page turner.

        Delete
    35. In all graciousness I cautioned and discouraged the ambidextrous delusional businesswoman with little education not to eat too much
      mouthwatering and gelatinous food this holiday, and if she partook of this behaviour, it would be unforgivable and end up with exhaustion,
      ulcerations, pneumonia, she would have to be inoculated, and end up in the crematorium after many autopsies!
      She neurotically replied, know your boundaries, you unsociable and unreasoning snob! This dialogue is unforgivable and of unimportance!
      I will be in a state of euphoria and exultation when each gregarious housemaid brings each dish of my favourites! I am unmotivated
      to listen to you! Do some soulsearching! Go talk to other ignoramuses you discountable malnourished nut! Pandemonium will not ensue!

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Very nice, ratoig!
        Very nice ratio of "winning words" to "also-ran words."

        LegoLambdium

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    36. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    37. With my family - a "stiff rum and coke" is a real thing.

      ReplyDelete
    38. Literary clue: A pun in James Joyce's Ulysses - I think in the National Library scene. If this helps, you won't be in debt to me.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Ha! I love _Ulysses_. Scylla and Charybdis! Got it!
        ---Rob

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    39. I submitted an answer with a one word item as well as a two word and a three word one, but the two word item is sort of abbreviated; normally three words but that would disqualify it. The three word item utilizes something that falls from... not a great height.

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      Replies
      1. And I have to agree this was somewhat insulting as a "challenge." I guess the challenge was just finding things that fit the category.

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    40. The dishes are made up of other words that may have alternate meanings.

      TOFURKEY > to fur key

      CANDIED CARROTS > can died car rots

      HUSHPUPPIES > hush pup pies

      FINGERBOWLS > finger bowls (These are a dish served with warm water. Just because you are not supposed to consume the contents it doesn’t mean it is any less a dish.)

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. How do WS's options fit that criteria? Especially "cornbread" (a compound word but the individual words are much the same, unless you think of bread as money); stuffing and boiled (which I find hard to split, and the alternate definitions I know are very similar unless you consider slang).

        One of the clues in this month's Atlantic Puzzle is "Food that is a racket" (6 letters), which does fit nicely with your interpretation.

        Delete
      2. eco,
        Corn could be a foot ailment, or bad humor. Bread can mean money. I also found stuffing and boiled hard to split, but you can have boils and you stuff furniture.

        Anyway I now see clearly that I do not have the intended answer and my only excuse is that I suffered all week from a severe vowel blockage.

        Delete
      3. "I am just shocked" (oh wait, we don't need to do that anymore) "that you missed" (oops, I did it again) "this, a corny puzzle" (must ... stop ... now...)

        Delete
      4. eco,
        You may be shocked, but at least you are not shucked.

        Delete
    41. So here are the food items on my Thanksgiving menu:

      Split Pea Soup
      Duck Liver Toast (trendy, sort of like Duck Foie Gras, without the bad rep; also note the vowels in reverse alphabetical order)
      Bacon Quiche
      Broiled Squab
      Smoked Quail (I think this was my submitted answer)
      Curried Salmon
      Tuna Pot Pie
      Cauliflower
      Candied Nut Roll
      Mom’s Fruitcake
      Double IPA

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Here is a somewhat different (and more demented) list:
        Cauliflower
        Fried quahogs (a delicacy in Rhode Island)
        Lukewarm cow milk
        Cold quail eggs
        Wild lake trout
        Duck ovaries (are they edible?)

        Delete
      2. Yes, but they taste offal.

        Delete
      3. Ken,
        You ask, are they edible? Ovary much so.

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      4. [I'm not going to egg him on.]

        Delete
      5. Don't believe everything you hear. No matter what they say, I did not spur my horse.

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      6. jan,
        Speaking of medical issues. Perhaps you can explain why on the news they announced there was a surgeon oil prices?

        Delete
      7. Gas pains, maybe? I don't know, maybe you should read the appendix.

        Delete
      8. I have heard of reading tea leaves, but reading appendix. I don't think I could stomach doing that.

        Delete
      9. It's way past the stomach in the GI tract, nearer the end, like in a book. It's off the :

        Delete
      10. I was a G I once, but I lost track of my discharge papers.

        Delete
    42. The names of all of the dishes contain each vowel A, E, I, O, and U exactly once.

      Cauliflower is probably the most obvious one-word choice for another dish. I sent in "braised sprouts" before checking word lists.

      "Milquetoast", "hallucinogens", "mouth-watering", "main course", "one-upmanship", "tongue-lashing", "tambourine", "tenacious" all fit the pattern.

      ReplyDelete
    43. I wrote, "An unusually easy one, indeed." My hint was in the first letters of those words. Some friends I know have guessed that the answer is that the foods mentioned come from the New World rather than the Old, but maybe that does not pass the "very unusual" stipulation.
      ---Rob

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    44. I'm having BUTTER CROISSANTS, QUICK YEAST ROLLS, FRIED COUNTRY HAM, and a COLD TURKEY SANDWICH if I survive. :)

      ReplyDelete
    45. My "Arugula & Lemon Oil Dressing will keep them coming back for seconds" has each vowel twice (if you let me get away with the & having no vowels).

      My comment "I might also say that one of Will's menu items has more in common than the other two, but I'm not going to tell you why" alludes to Spit-Roast Turkey also having Y as a vowel, with the word "Why" hinting at my meaning. I decided not to say "... 20% more ...".

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    46. Each of the foods listed in the puzzle contains all five vowels. There are at least four one-word foods that have the same property: cauliflower, andouille, bouillabaisse and ratatouille.

      The most common of the four and most likely to be served at Thanksgiving dinner in my opinion would be cauliflower (though my ex-wife’s aunt did serve bouillabaisse one Thanksgiving a gazillion years ago - delicious :)

      Wishing Blaine and all Blainesville bloggers a very happy Thanksgiving.

      Chuck

      ReplyDelete
    47. Ellen DeGeneres’s Vegen Feed (Dresden, Tennessee)

      Entrées *:
      Eggs
      Cheese
      Chevre
      Lefse

      Entrées*:
      Peppered Beef
      Elk
      Eel
      Deer
      Geese

      Veg:
      Dressed Greens
      Red Bell Peppers
      Leeks
      Beets
      Fennel

      Desserts:

      Bev:
      Teem
      Beer

      * Apparently, “entrée” can mean both appetizer and main course.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Rumor has it that Alan Alda is considering something similar for Saraland, Alabama. The menu isn't set, but it will include Pasta Salad.

        Delete
    48. What I submitted:

      My answer: Those three dishes each use all 5 vowels (a, e, i, o & u) once and once only.

      One other thing that might be served? Ma's chicken soup.

      My lament: chocolate pudding came SOOOO CLOSE! Too bad chocolate has two o's.

      ReplyDelete
    49. Agree that once, and once only, vowel usage made it more interesting.

      "It's $1250 a course?" fits that structure...
      Which, as a Wheel of Fortune puzzle, would have cost 5x$250=$1250
      (If vowel prices haven't appreciated!)

      ReplyDelete
    50. "I am not very thankful" for this puzzle uses each vowel once, and fits cryptic clue criteria. Vegan sushi rolls also fit the requirement if not the tradition.

      ReplyDelete
    51. All the Thanksgiving dishes have the 5 vowels, a, e, i, o, and u, used exactly once; I submitted CAULIFLOWER.

      I do bring a yummy smashed cauliflower dish to our Thanksgiving Table. No praise for using all the vowels, though ;-) {until now, anyway}.

      Behaviour, facetious, abstemious and Julia Child's French home, La Pitchoune, all pointed to words or phrases using all the vowels exactly once.

      "Oui, yes, ya" >>> 5 vowels.

      "Crucify them!" refers to cruciferous veggies, including cauliflower.

      ReplyDelete
    52. -Spit-roast turkey
      -Cornbread stuffing
      -Boiled squash

      Each item contains the vowels, AEIOU, once and only once (so “Quiche Lorraine” does not qualify). Another such item that “might be served at Thanksgiving dinner” is CAULIFLOWER or LOQUAT PIE, GOULASH PIE, SAUTÉD BISON, SAUTÉD RHINO, SAUTÉD HIPPO, SAUTÉD LION, etc, depending on where you are from!☺
      And then there is the ever popularized & authorized UNICORN STEAK!

      (W)HOUPPY THANKSGIVEN !

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Admittedly, my suggestion of Quiche Lorraine doesn't work. However, Sauted is correctly spelled sauteed, with 2 e's, so the zoo menu doesn't qualify either.

        Delete
      2. Thanks CL. Make that Bison sauté, Rhino sauté, Hippo sauté, Lion sauté.

        Delete
    53. Check out the front page of the New York Times for a (pretty easy) Will Shortz and Joel Fagliano Thanksgiving puzzle.

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    54. I went with Cauliflower, even though I've never server, or been served, that vegetable on Thanksgiving. My hint of a Simon and/or Garfunkel song referred The Boxer, thinking of the cauliflower ears of many pugilists.

      ReplyDelete
    55. Surprised no one mentioned, but the term of art is "supervocalic," which of course is itself a supervocalic.

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    56. If you think about gravy this time of year you probably think of giblet gravy, and if you really think about what giblets are you might say they're foul. Foul giblet gravy. Just a bad joke.

      "The shotgun that killed this turkey had a tremendous kick to it." A 'tremendous kick', in this context, is an 'awful recoil', which is an anagram of CAULIFLOWER. And think it's better raw than cooked.

      I think Blaine and Margaret's HOT CRANBERRY MUFFINS is a perfectly good answer.

      'Deft language-butchers' are 'adroit punsters'. ROASTED TURNIPS
      A 'brusque, supercilious amanuensis' is a 'gruff, snotty scribe'. CRAB-OYSTER STUFFING

      My 3-word answer that should have everyone's UNPRODDED BACKING is BAKED CORN PUDDING.

      ReplyDelete
    57. A,E,I,O,U per dish. I'm reminded of that kid's song, where you take the phrase: "I like to eat, eat, eat, apple's and bananas!"; and then substitute the 'a' with all the other vowels. "I like to eat, eat, eat, eeples, and beeneenees", and so on.

      I realize now that dishes with more than one same vowel are discounted. So, my addition of RATATOUILLE, although it contains all the vowels, doesn't count. CAULIFLOWER wins!

      ReplyDelete
    58. SO... What might the Beverly Hillbillies, rednecks, 1980s yuppies, and a hunter in a fantasy world possibly be having for Thanksgiving dinner?

      1) Possum Entrails
      2) Lemur Road Kill
      3) Pizza Fondue
      4) Carved Unicorn

      Some other answers:

      A Fried Foul
      Apple Liquor

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. I searched for lists of traditional Thanksgiving dishes and fairly early in my searching I found hickory nut cake. Kind of surprised nobody else seems to have thought of/stumbled upon that one.

        Delete
    59. Good list, ratoig. I just love pizza fondue. Yupp, I Entered into this vale of tears in Wisconsin, and therefore can never get enough cheese.

      Regarding my facetious Thanksgiving Day dinner at Timothy Leary's house: all the dishes on his menu -- the sea bream, mushrooms seasoned with nutmeg, and his "special” brownies – were hAllUcInOgEns!

      LegoWhoIsNowLeeryOfTakingBrowniesFromStangers

      ReplyDelete
    60. ecoarchitect, how about the moniker ucoarchitect or ecoarchituct for this week?

      You, too, can be supervocalic which, I believe, could be consonant with your Thanksgiving plans. ;-)

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. New occupancies? You named it (communicated?), uncombative, subordinated, odalisque Bulletin Woman in concubinage.

        No one mentioned:
        edacious - of, relating to, or given to eating. Very apropos
        gourmandise - eat well, eat greedily
        degustation - tasting or savoring
        overeating - Jan got 70% of the way there, many more will be there tomorrow.
        outfeasting - same
        permutations - lots of those here
        expurgation - lots of that needed here

        Enjoy Thanksgiving!

        Delete
    61. Now I am again confused. The New York Times online edition has this headline at the top of the front page:

      Turkey Shoots Down Russian Warplane Near Syrian Border

      Being it is so close to Thanksgiving Day, would this be considered a turkey shoot?

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Maybe we should show our displeasure with Turkey's actions by having some poutine -- you know, the Turks are fighting the [cheese] Kurds.

        Delete
      2. Saddam Hussein always complained of having Kurds in his way too.

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      3. Must be why they found him hiding in a spider hole.

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      4. Actually he was sharing it with Little Miss Muffet because they had so much in common. She was careful not to get in his whey though.

        Delete
      5. Down came his reign, and washed him out. Oops, wrong spider rhyme.

        Delete
      6. I think we are being a bit hard on a guy who ran his country for decades rather successfully, albeit cruelly. It must have been a mixed blessing to have that much power and yet have to constantly worry about being murdered by those closest to him. A difficult job and he didn't get the hang of it until the very end.

        Delete
      7. Unfortunately after the son dried up the reign the ItSy bItSy spiders are climbing again.

        Delete
      8. The itsy bitsy spider
        Climbed up the waterspout
        Down came the rain
        And washed the spider out
        Out came the sun
        And dried up all the rain
        And the itsy bitsy spider
        Climbed up the spout again

        The itsy bitsy spider
        Climbed up the kitchen wall
        Swoosh! went the fan
        And made the spider fall
        Off went the fan
        No longer did it blow
        So the itsy bitsy spider
        Back up the wall did go

        The itsy bitsy spider
        Climbed up the yellow pail
        In came a mouse
        And flicked her with his tail
        Down fell the spider
        The mouse ran out the door
        Then the itsy bitsy spider
        Climbed up the pail once more

        The itsy bitsy spider
        Climbed up the rocking chair
        Up jumped a cat
        And knocked her in the air
        Down plopped the cat
        And when he was asleep
        The itsy bitsy spider
        Back up the chair did creep

        The itsy bitsy spider
        Climbed up the maple tree
        She slipped on some dew
        And landed next to me
        Out came the sun
        And when the tree was dry
        The itsy bitsy spider
        Gave it one more try

        The itsy bitsy spider
        Climbed up without a stop
        She spun a silky web
        Right at the very top
        She wove and she spun
        And when her web was done
        The itsy bitsy spider
        Rested in the sun

        And, of course, her name was Charlotte. . .

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      9. I'm impressed. And, sung to the tune of Hail, Columbia.

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      10. I did a little research.
        Most female spiders are larger than their male counterparts. So an 'itsy bitsy' spider would probably be male.
        Male spiders tend to stop feeding (you read it right -- stop feeding) upon reaching maturity, in order to attend to 'other matters'. Wasn't there some famous lab rat that died of starvation by continuously pressing the 'cocaine' bar and ignoring the 'food' bar? Too much selenium in the food?
        jan has it all upside down. VPOTUS is serenaded with The Itsy Bitsy Spider.

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    62. My menu for tomorrow's vowel fest:
      Choice of: Split pea soup, Ma's chicken soup, or Dad's lentil soup
      Breads: Cornbread muffins, Quick bread rolls, Hot cranberry muffins
      Main Dishes: Broiled tuna, Roasted duckling
      Condiment: Half sour pickles
      Veggies: Cauliflower, Roasted turnips, Red quinoa
      Desserts: Hot rhubarb pie, Brown bread pudding, Walnut brownies, or Hot fruit cake

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    63. My wife points out that "holiday menu" itself fits the pattern.

      WARNING: We are approaching the 200 comment mark. Only the first 200 comments are displayed initially. Click "Load more" to load more.

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    64. As has been mentioned several times now, each of Will’s Thanksgiving dishes contains one instance of each of the five vowels.

      The key words in my posting were flippant (and) obscure and Redwood City, CA.

      Instead of flippant (and) obscure, I first wrote facetious, which contains each of the vowels once, but felt the clue would be too obvious. So I added obscure, to take the focus away from facetious. Still not satisfied, I changed facetious to flippant, a synonym. By happenstance, note that the combination of flippant and obscure contains each of the vowels once.

      Redwood City, CA, refers to the Sequoia giant redwood tree. Sequoia also contains each of the vowels once.

      In my reply to Philly Cinephile, Boxing Day alludes to flattened and misshapen cauliflower ears – an affliction suffered by some veteran boxers.

      My suggested dishes for Will were Hot Curried Yams and Ma’s Oyster Stuffing.

      Happy Thanksgiving! – Phil J.

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