Sunday, March 13, 2016

NPR Sunday Puzzle (March 13, 2016): Monthly Actress and Poet Meeting

NPR Sunday Puzzle (March 13, 2016): Monthly Actress and Poet Meeting:
Q: Take the name of a well-known actress. Her first name starts with the three-letter abbreviation for a month. Replace this with the three-letter abbreviation of a different month, and you'll get the name of a famous poet. Who are these two people?
At least there are only 12 months to deal with, not 13.

Edit: The actress played President Alma Coin from District 13 in "The Hunger Games: Mockingjay" (Parts 1 and 2).
A: JULIANNE MOORE --> MARIANNE MOORE

100 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. If you want to pick a range for this week, reply here with your pick as to the number of correct answers that will be submitted. Only one range per person and only one person per range.
      0 - 25
      26 - 50
      51 - 75
      76 - 100
      101 - 125
      126 - 150
      151 - 175
      176 - 200
      201 - 225
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      251 - 275
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      501 - 550
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      951 - 1,000

      1,001 - 1,050
      1,051 - 1,100
      1,101 - 1,150
      1,151 - 1,200
      1,201 - 1,250
      1,251 - 1,300
      1,301 - 1,350
      1,351 - 1,400
      1,401 - 1,450
      1,451 - 1,500

      1,501 - 1,550
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      1,601 - 1,650
      1,651 - 1,700
      1,701 - 1,750
      1,751 - 1,800
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      1,951 - 2,000

      2,001 - 2,250
      2,251 - 2,500
      2,501 - 2,750
      2,751 - 3,000
      3,001 - 3,500
      3,501 - 4,000
      4,001 - 4,500
      4,501 - 5,000

      More than 5,000

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  2. This week's challenge can lead to boredom and it's certainly not June/Jane Seymour...

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  3. I have to admit, I had not heard of the poet. I was more familiar with the actress. Looking at lists was the temporary and limited cure for my ignorance. ---Rob

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  4. Famous poet??? I didn't noet.

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  5. Done. Now I've got a hankering for wild strawberries! --Margaret G.

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    Replies
    1. Not sure why - Will Shortz used part of that phrase in his on-air puzzle today. :/

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    2. Doesn't the 3-letter abbreviation have to be at the beginning of the name?

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    3. Well, seeing as this actress never worked with Bergman...

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  6. Hints so far lead to passing on this one altogether and spending the saved daylight on something else.

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  7. DST is here and now I can enjoy the beautiful spacious skies for an extra hour this evening.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  8. Yea! A clue I actually solved on the same day. At least I think I solved it. :|

    351 - 375 range, please.

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  9. As I was making what seems to be the final post of last week's thread, I noticed a post from Paul. Since decided to reference it, here are final two posts from last week:

    Paul posted on Sun Mar 13, at 06:30:00 AM PDT:

    Uncultured oaf that I am, I had never heard of the poet and was only vaguely aware of the actress. I found my answer, which seems to fit the hints already given, in a list.

    I then posted on Sun Mar 13, at 07:30:00 AM PDT:

    I know the names of a lot of actresses, but I don't know poets that well, so I thought I'd better work backwards by going through Wikipedia's list of poets. (Blaine, don't worry. -- It's a LONG, LONG LIST!)

    When I found an answer, I SO DID NOT recognize the poet that I kept going through the list until the end. It remains the only answer I found.

    I see that Paul just posted basically the same thing I've said.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You do NOT have time for puzzles! Please go out and look for a job!!! These puzzles are for FUN after work!!!

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  10. I’m good to go when it comes to actresses. But could some kind soul post the URL to a useful list of poets?

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    1. Not me; I'm the rotten kind of so-and-so who'd tell you what to do with your list once you find it.

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    2. Didn't you see my recap of the last two posts of last week's thread!?!?

      Didn't you notice that the words "Wikipedia's list of poets were in a different color?

      Couldn't you have tried to mouse over them and thereby notice that when you do, those words brighten up and are underlined!?

      Couldn't you have then tried, Oh I don't know, right clicking and then selecting "Open in new tab"...?

      Delete
  11. I solved it quickly with a list of famous actresses and when I found the one that could work I switched the letters and used a Google search to come up with the poet. I am unfamiliar with both of them. The hints were of no help at all for me.

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  12. I am glad I solved that one quickly because I can now get back to what is currently puzzling me. Last night I happened to hear an old Irving Berlin song on the radio which got me to wondering, is it really true that gay Arab royalty dance sheikh to sheikh?

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  13. I got it fast! Unfamiliar with the poet, but I find the actress very attractive. Wonder how many bloggers will not recognize the poet by the name?

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  14. If I am correct, there is something else oddly similar about their names.

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  15. I finally got it so everything’s good here. Actually the actress has always been one of my favorites. Never heard of the poet. I think Will must be close to scraping the bottom of the barrel.

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  16. There is a poet with a name very similar to the actress. And though that poetry was not well received then or now, some very well known writers used the poet for inspiration.

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  17. Neither of these characters' first initials match their birth months....oh well.

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  18. Funny enough, if you remove part of this actress' name, you'll get the name of a character she played in one of the most acclaimed sci-fi movies this side of "2001."

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    Replies
    1. Working with lists and guessing that only 2 months in particular were probable, I understand your remark.

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  19. Happy Pi Day. 3.1416>>>3/14/16.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If my math teacher had recited Pi like this I would have paid attention.

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  20. I wonder how many folks are trying to get Maya Angelou to work. The poet is probably less well-known to most Americans than Ms. Angelou. The actress might be better known. She did replace an actress in a sequel to an acclaimed movie; the sequel was much less well-received than the original, but not because of the performance of this actress.

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    Replies
    1. I quickly abandoned "trying to get Maya Angelou to work" when I noticed she has not written a word since she died.

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    2. I know; dead people can be so lazy!

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    3. It's even worse than that. For instance, Beethoven's decomposing now.

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    4. The same might be said of most dead poets, maybe they'll make a society.

      SDB, I've not heard any griping on this puzzle, do you actually like it? I'd give this puzzle a 9.

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    5. He'll anagram that and just say nein.

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    6. What I liked about this puzzle is that I solved it very quickly and did not have to spend a lot of time going over long lists of things I have no interest in. You may have noticed that many of the puzzles I made up, and Lego sometimes runs over at Puzzleria!, are geographical and, to my way of thinking, are somewhat interesting.

      I would give this one a 3. For a more interesting one, try the new Car Talk Puzzler which is a number progression. Or you could try to find the only country that can be typed on just one row of a standard keyboard.

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    7. Hey Sports Fans, what is the 3-letter abbreviation for May anyway?

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    8. Good question, GB. I May get back to you on that later.

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  21. Too easy, SDB. How about naming a world capital that can be typed on just one row?

    Or a major US city?

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  22. Replies
    1. ...and you could even have a salad in Dallas with a sad lad and his dad!

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    2. or have pot pie in Quito with a poor, quiet, poetry troupe and their typewriter.

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  23. To the good side of this week’s puzzle: I never had a list of poets before – now I have a list of 2,026 poets. I will be more prepared when poetry comes around again :)

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    Replies
    1. Chuck, you are no longer "signing" your posts. How do we known it is really you?

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  24. Well-known actress? Well, no. Famous poet? I did not know it. I guess us folks here in fly-over country are not as cultured as East Coast elites like Mr. Shortz, who knows well his thespians and jongleurs.

    That said, this is a very fine puzzle.

    Five very fine puzzles this week on Puzzleria! You can post your answers at noon Pacific Daylight Time on Tuesday, today/tomorrow.

    LegoEricaJongleur

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  25. OK, Ron - this is just for you.

    Chuck

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  26. I think the actress was once related to a June Taylor dancer.

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  27. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  28. "A very fine puzzle."
    Metaphysico-theolego-cosmonigology, perhaps.

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  29. A clue for the Ides of March: Veni, vidi, vici!

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  30. Everyone's talking politics today, so: The actress shares most of a name with someone mentioned as a possible running mate in November, who shares a name with another political figure.

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  31. Actress: Julianne Moore – Poet: Marianne Moore

    Last Sunday I said, “I finally got it so everything’s good here. Actually the actress has always been one of my favorites. Never heard of the poet.” Everything’s good here as in The Kids Are All Right.”

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  32. JULIANNE MOORE, MARIANNE MOORE

    > After solving this puzzle, I felt cast adrift, wanting something else.

    I felt unmoored, wanting more.

    > A clue for the Ides of March: Veni, vidi, vici!

    A boast of Julius Caesar, for whom July is named, from one of his wars, the Roman god of which, Mars, is the namesake of March.

    > The actress shares most of a name with someone mentioned as a possible running mate in November, who shares a name with another political figure.

    HUD secretary and former San Antonio mayor, Julian Castro.

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  33. JULIA ROBERTS, JUNIA ROBERTS

    "Clarinet" referred to Julia Roberts who plays the clarinet.

    Junia Roberts is quite obscure but I liked the variation of June as Junia and the easy transition from Julia to Junia ;-).

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    1. "Junia" is how we in the New York area refer to someone with the same given name as his father.

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    2. Yes! So Mr. Julia, the younger, is Mr. Julia Junia? ;-)

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    3. His Wikipedia page suggests that Raúl Juliá begat two Raúl Juliá, Junias.

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    4. Maybe he marched, to a different drummer, jan. . .

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    5. My local library used to have an automated device that would call your phone when a reserved book was ready for pickup. It had just enough artificial intelligence that it pronounced my name, "January".

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  34. There is a sort of New York Times crossword puzzle tie-in this week. One clue was "Source of the names of two months", with the answer "Roman Emperors".

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    Replies
    1. Yeah, but the august puzzle master denies he does that on purpose.

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  35. JULIANNE MOORE > MARIANNE MOORE

    No hint again this week. And I didn't forget to post at noon today; I just got back from an eye exam.

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  36. I tried to raise SDB's hackles by "giving the puzzle a 9". "a nine" are the anagrammed letters missing from Jul- and Mar-. And it's hard to go a week without an anagram.

    Interesting that so many had not heard of either person - Marianne Moore is pretty well known, at least I thought.

    Julianne Moore's list of movie awards is pretty impressive, including Best Actress Oscar last year, plus 4 other nominations. Hard to call her obscure.

    I also hinted about Julia Ann Moore, aka "the sweet singer of Michigan". She was more known for her very bad poetry, and Mark Twain may have used her as inspiration for a very bad poet in Huckleberry Finn. She also inspired Ogden Nash, though not in a complimentary way.

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  37. JULIANNE MOORE, MARIANNE MOORE
    Don't know the poet's work, but I do like good-looking redheaded females.

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  38. Actress: JULIANNE MOORE. (JUL = JULY)

    Poet: MARIANNE MOORE. (MAR = MARCH)

    Back Door clue: “boredom” anagrams to MOORE + BD “Back Door.”

    Eco's poet: Julia A. Moore.

    Actress: Maria Moore.

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  39. I never heard of Julianne Moore.
    I never liked Marianne Moore's poetry.
    I am glad I sat this one out.

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  40. My clues -
    This puzzle is just alright (kids are alright) and less (vs Moore) challenging than recent ones so I will look forward to next (Next the movie) week's.

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  41. So what was Blaine's clue about? I think it's this: In The IMDb's biography page for Julianne Moore the trivia section includes the following paragraph:

    Is one of 13 actresses to have won the Academy Award, BAFTA Award, Critics' Choice Award, Golden Globe Award and SAG Award for the same performance. The others in chronological order are Julia Roberts for Erin Brockovich (2000), Renée Zellweger for Cold Mountain (2003), Reese Witherspoon for Walk the Line (2005), Helen Mirren for The Queen (2006), Jennifer Hudson for Dreamgirls (2006), Kate Winslet for The Reader (2008), Mo'Nique for Precious (2009), Natalie Portman for Black Swan (2010), Octavia Spencer for The Help (2011), Anne Hathaway for Les Misérables (2012), Cate Blanchett for Blue Jasmine (2013) and Patricia Arquette for Boyhood (2014).

    Considering that her winning of those awards was last year (2015 for 'Still Alice'), that makes her
    the thirteenth and most recent winner of all 5 awards.

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    Replies
    1. What are you doing on here again? Stop wasting time! You NEED A JOB! You will not have power or the internet soon to work on these puzzles!

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  42. I thought a number of the comments this week, including Blaine's and one of jan's, pertained to The Hunger Games. I was apparently wrong about jan's.

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  43. Anybody else come up with Julie Harris and Marie Harris? You probably know Julie and if you Google Marie Harris you see she is a poet,and hardly unknown.

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  44. I said: "Funny enough, if you remove part of this actress' name, you'll get the name of a character she played in one of the most acclaimed sci-fi movies this side of '2001.'"

    Julianne Moore played Julian in "Children of Men."

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  45. Next week's challenge, from listener Andrew Chaikin of San Francisco: Think of a common nine-letter word that contains five consecutive consonants. Take three consecutive consonants out of these five and replace them with vowels to form another common nine-letter word. What is it?

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  46. I don't know if this will be easy to solve by brute force, searching lists, etc., but something very strange happened to me:

    I always write down the first word I can think of for challenges like this, just to see what a nine-letter word looks like, put in gibberish if necessary to see where vowels and consonants might fit, etc.

    But this morning, the very first word I put down was the right answer! This is not the way I usually work!

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    Replies
    1. I had a similar experience, Bob K. Easy, but weird.

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  47. Well Bob I do know this my brain is definitely overtaxed. I'll leave this to you mensa boys .

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  48. BTW, the first word also has another oddity .

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  49. What did the monks say to the barber?

    or

    Sign on a doctors-only lounge?

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  50. Now that I've had my mental exercise, I'll head to the gym for a workout. At my age, I have to work hard to stay in shape.

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  51. Need clarification. Are the consonants consecutive in the alphabet (b,c,d,f,g for example) or in consecutive positions in the word?

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    1. . . .Though it would be fun to find a word with 5 consonants in a row. At first go, I don't think there are any. . .

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    2. My birthplace has five consecutive letters.

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    3. 5 consecutive consonants, zeke creek?

      Of course, I mean 5 consonants in consecutive order, as in bcdfg, with no vowels in between.

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    4. Btw thx ww.
      Five no consecutive consonants.
      Humbly corrected,
      zc

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  52. Appropriate for the season - one might find this mental excercise somewhat taxiing.

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  53. Too easy for us. We'll have to wait till next week for a harder puzzle.

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