Sunday, October 02, 2016

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Oct 2, 2016): What Do You Do?

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Oct 2, 2016): What Do You Do?:
Q: Name an 11-letter occupation starting with H. If you have the right one, you can rearrange the letters to name two things a worker with this occupation uses — one in six letters and one in five. What occupation is it?
I came up with curtains and a towel, but that isn't right.

Edit: My clues were to shears (curtains) and a drier (towel).
A: HAIRDRESSER --> SHEARS + DRIER

141 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. Hmmm. The spelling of one of the words is not the usual one for this word in this form.

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    Replies
    1. I have that answer, and it is probably the one Will meant, but it involves a common error, using an adjective form of a word instead of a noun form. ---Rob

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    2. It seems to depend on which dictionary you use. Merriam-Webster and dictionary.com show both spellings for the noun.

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    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    4. I actually submitted the alternate spelling of the word, and my wife pointed out the normal spelling to me. But, I also saw the Merriam-Webster entry about that word.

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    5. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    6. Will can blame his error-of-the-week by claiming his confusing the spelling with the Old-French.

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  3. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    Replies
    1. How many 11-letter occupations starting with H can you think of ? Haberdasher and doesn't a horoscopist use choirs on his stoop?

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  4. Puns are best doled out sparingly, IMHO. (After hearing today's on-air puzzle). But, I did like wee tees.

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    1. Have you ever noticed that the establishments of people of the puzzle's profession often have pun names? ---Rob

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    2. Yes! Almost as good as Waverly Person at the USGS National Earthquake Information Center here in Golden. A wave of sadness swept over the local geology community when he retired.

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    3. I had almost forgotten Waverly Person. He was wonderful

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  5. You can also rearrange the 11 letters to name participants in a recent puzzle.

    We at the Society To Restrain Anagram Puzzles are not proud to have noticed this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Whee, anagrams!
      And, as they say on the Jeopardy Forum, and instaget.
      I am suspicious of the reported number of submissions last week, but if true this week should reach 4000.

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    2. I meant "an" instaget, but I can only find a delete function, not an edit.

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  6. There are two spellings for one of the things – I picked the spelling that works :)

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    Replies
    1. Does SHE work? [Aside from a disastrous reality show, that is.]

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    2. Correct spelling:
      t-o-r-i: plural form of torus, or a large convex molding, more or less semicircular in profile, commonly forming the lowest molding of the base of a column
      t-o-r-i-i: a traditional Japanese gate
      T-o-r-y: a British conservative politician
      t-o-o-r-i-e: a tassel or bobble on a bonnet

      And what do you suppose a-a-Ron spelling would be?

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    3. I think you understood my post quite well. :-)

      As they say in Russia: The difference between the people and the rulers is czar chasm.

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    4. And a Russian ruler sick with acid reflux would worry about his czar cough o' gas.

      A true strike against WW's admonition of sparing the pun.

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    5. Those who disparage puns should be punished mercilessly. I tell you this up pun my honor as a wit.

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    6. I simply need time to savor each pun. This morning's offerings came so fast (and over breakfast) I had cereal indigestpun.

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    7. Rachel was making such a fuss about "skip-e" that I had to listen a second time to hear what was said.

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    8. SDB: you are a pungent member of this community.

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    9. eco:
      I assume you mean I fall into one of the two definitions showing on Merriam-Webster:

      1. having a strong, sharp taste or smell

      2. having a strong effect on the mind because of being clever and direct

      Do I get to choose which one; or you?

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    10. Paul:
      I usually listen to the puzzle while still in bed, half asleep. This is not ideal for solving the on air challenge, especially when I cannot write anything down. The funny thing, to me anyway, is that I usually get the ones the guest either cannot solve or has trouble solving. Such was the case yesterday with Skippy fake peanut butter. I actually got the answer as WS said "Skippy." I knew where he was going with that one right away. I have long thought it strange that I do better with the difficult ones than the others. I wonder if anyone else here has a similar experience???

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    11. I often yell the answers to my pup, Maizie, who shakes her head in either agreement or surprise.

      Sometimes, as this week, Will rushes through the instructions and example, on a somewhat complicated puzzle.

      Other times, like last week, Will gives a longer, slower set of instructions. We all got those. But, then listening to the on-air player anagramming "tuna" to a word starting with "a" was a painful few seconds. . .

      But, ask me again about this if I ever get "the call." ­čśé

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  7. One of my clients is a hydrologist; she often uses a short dilogy.

    Would US control after the Haitian Coup be considered a military occupation?

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  8. Finally saw through Will's attempt at a puzzle; seems like he will share part of the blame for this one.

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    Replies
    1. Does anyone else think that Snipper has an unfair advantage this week?

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    2. Yes! We've seen your chromosomes!

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    3. I think I had an unfair advantage on another puzzle over the last year or so.

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    4. I've wondered, why are you Snipper, Snipper?

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    5. I'll let you know on Thursday!

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    6. Thanks for giving us the heads-up!

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  9. I seem to remember this profession as having a lot of ups and downs.

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  10. I have an alternative answer. It's not great, but it might pass. Does that mean I shouldn't post it in comments? (It's definitely not the intended answer.)

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    Replies
    1. Best to wait until the Thursday deadline to post an alternate answer that may also be accepted.

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    2. A hexametrist would certainly use hextra items, n'est-ce pas?

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  11. Replies
    1. But maybe it wouldn't be such a bruxistic dining experience if you also ordered a jumbo chicken to complement the condiment.

      LegoAlsoSuggestsAlsoConsideringTryingOurHot(OrCold)TurkeySandwich

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  12. Replies
    1. Hmm. I was thinking Westworld (the original)

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  13. Anyone for a delicious Frosty Hot?

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  14. I'm not sure I understand the question. Distressing.

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    1. It's not that hot, Henry Willis! Get out of the air conditioning and the answer will become apparent to you.

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    2. I'm must be missing some by-play here. Henry obviously has the answer.

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    3. Yes, he does. And I am riffing off his clue. More Thursday, Mendo Jim.

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    4. My somewhat obscure hint "Frosty Hot" was taken from "Comfort and Joy," a British film about, among other things, deep fried ice cream. Which is the description that some scientists give to comets. Which get their name from the Greek for "Long-haired stars." Which leads us to hairdressers, of course. All of which Word Woman deduced.

      And as for her punning, it reminds me of the old riddle about the difference between the crown prince, an orangutan and an orphan: one is an heir apparent, the other has a hairy parent and the last one has nary a parent. But I thought that offering that in response might be too much of a giveaway.

      As for "Black and White," I honestly am baffled. Any hints to the hint Hugh?

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    5. I was referring to the Frosty Hot Chocolate admittedly brown and white, but it seemed to be a good spot to sneak in a synonym for cut and dried

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  15. Why is the Democrat wearing a red tie and the republikan wearing a blue tie? Why am I watching this crap anyway?

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    1. Your a glutton for punishment.

      Happily I have no TV in my office, and I convinced myself that my radio doesn't work. And neither does my internet!

      After seeing the article about the Indiana parade I thought a little musical break would be appropriate, and I penned:

      70-sick Trump moans in a big tirade,
      With a hundred and ten wild tweets close at hand.
      They were followed by miles and miles of the biggest size o'
      Lies, the chief of our decrepit land.


      Best I can do on short notice. Others more talented please chime in.

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    2. Of course that should be "You're a glutton..."

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    3. I guess I am a glutton for pain, but it is amazing to see the silver haired nincompoop stumbling and lying and looking like the moron he is. I did not think it was going to be this interesting to watch.

      Great lyrics, BTW.

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    4. Whew, thanks for that fix, eco.

      Had not heard about the parade. Great riff off "76 trombones in history," though it took me a few minutes to get there.

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    5. The Music Man is, after all, about a man posing as a (band) leader intent on conning the honest but naive folk in the Midwest, promising all and giving nothing....

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    6. Enjoyed Paroo-sing your clue, eco.

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    7. With all of Trump's sniffing, it makes sense that we are referencing The Mucus Man.

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    8. It would have been hilarious if she could have handed him a tissue, like mommy used to do.

      In my ever-increasing effort to avoid working on work, I give you:

      The You Sick Plan (alternate title suggestions welcome)
      70-sick Trump moans in a big tirade,
      With a hundred and ten wild tweets close at hand.
      They were followed by piles and piles of the biggest size o'
      Lies, Commander-in-Thief of our forsaken land.

      Hillary quickly claimed she's the only one,
      With the qualifications to head the realm.
      Why should we be forced to stand having at her closest hand,
      Slick Willy again so near the helm?

      Gary Johnson is Libertarian,
      What are his chances, who can know?
      He doesn’t believe that we ever need to intercede,
      So why should he find Aleppo?

      Doctor Jill Stein is from the Green Party,
      With no coverage no one knows her name.
      Industries won't let us see actual democracy,
      So it’s politics all the Same.

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    9. eco, you must have a really big project due. . .

      I do like your verse; is it inverse to the amount of work staring you in the face?

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    10. Gary Ind teed to be a circus.

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  16. 76 projects sitting on my desk,
    and a thousand and ten emails to peruse.
    With so little time I can only make up rhyme
    And give my clients some excuse.

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    Replies
    1. Most humorous and very relatable.

      eco versus (sic) clients.

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  17. As long as we're riffing on old songs, I just thought of a hopeful update to Wasn't That a Mighty Storm, looking forward to looming Matthew instead of back to the 1900 Galveston hurricane:

    Wasn't that a mighty storm?
    Wasn't that a mighty storm in the morning, well?
    Wasn't that a mighty storm
    That blew all the Zika away.

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    Replies
    1. (Actually this article and this one, too suggest the opposite effect.)

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    2. HAIRDRESSER >>> SHEARS, DRIER

      "Hmmm. The spelling of one of the words is not the usual one for this word in this form." referred to drier vs. dryer, of course.

      "Yes! We've seen your chromosomes!" referred to the DNA in hair.

      "Thanks for giving us the heads-up!" >>> head of hair.

      "It's not that hot, Henry Willis! Get out of the (h)air conditioning and the answer will become (heir) apparent to you."

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    3. {jan, I was getting ready to post about Zika and then you did.}

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    4. I sent in one of my rare submissions this week just to make sure the Willymaster knows his spelling error kind of voids the challenge.
      Anyone else make the point?
      Perhaps an acknowledgement and an apology might make some slight amends. Not holding my breath.

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    5. Mendo Jim, it's not the preferred spelling for the noun (dryer) but, as others have mentioned, drier is also acceptable as the noun. Hence, I said nothing to Will.

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    6. I am unconvinced.
      If Shortz's listeners let iffy puzzles go unremarked, then they can only expect more of them.

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  18. hairdresser, shears, drier

    Last Sunday I said, “There are two spellings for one of the things – I picked the spelling that works :)” Dryer and drier. Drier works.

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  19. HAIRDRESSER =
    DRIER + SHEARS

    I asked the question: “How many 11-letter occupations starting with H can you think of ?” Here is my answer:
    haberdasher
    hagiologist
    hairdresser
    hairstylist
    hardwareman
    heroologist
    hexametrist
    hierologist
    histologist
    homebuilder
    homesteader
    horoscopist
    hotelkeeper
    housekeeper
    hydrologist
    hyperbolist

    A total of 16 occupations.
    Can you beat this ? With "housemother" (an occupation ?), et al. ?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can't vouch for all of these, but other possibilities not yet mentioned may include:

      habilitator; hair clipper; hair crimper; hair remover; hairweavers; hammersmith; hammy acting; hand fishing; hand knitter; hand laborer; hand riveter; hand trimmer; handworkman; harvest lady; harvest lord; harvest work; hat trimming; hatcheryman; having a baby; head of state (defeat, oaths); headdresser; headhunters; headmasters; helmet liner; helmetmaker; helping hand; hemstitcher; Her Highness; Her Ladyship; hill climber; hill planter; Hindu priest; hippologist; hired killer; His Highness; His Holiness; His Lordship; historician; historicist; hoist loader; home teacher; hook climber; hoop bundler; horologists; horse dealer; horse doctor; horse driver; Horse Guards; horse marine; horse master; horse trader; horsejockey; horsekeeper; horseshoers; hospitaller; hospitalman; hospitalmen; hotel broker; house doctor; house farmer; householder; householdry; houseparent; houseworker; hydriatrist; hydromancer; hyperaspist.

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    2. hairclipper
      handstamper
      harmonocist
      housesitter
      hangingchad
      honeybooboo
      holdupabank (more of a job than occupation)
      humantarget

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    3. Houselifter
      Houseraiser
      In case anyone wonders, it's a real occupation, I've got 4 projects using them right now.

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  20. HAIRDRESSER = SHEARS & DRIER

    My Hint:

    “I seem to remember this profession as having a lot of ups and downs.” Hinting at a barber chair that pumps up and down.

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  21. Blaine's "What do you do" had a nice double entendre.

    "You can also rearrange the 11 letters to name participants in a recent puzzle." Hairdresser rearranges to Ridesharers, from the Uber/ Lyft = butterfly puzzle, I think in May.

    "Keep it in the freezer by the hamburger." The word for hairdresser is "Friseur" - pronounced very much like freezer, at least to one from Hamburg, who might go to this shop. I don't think Teamwork is a German word.

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    Replies
    1. Hairdresser in French is coiffeur/coiffeuse.

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    2. Despite your "German" shop. "Friseur" n'existe pas en fran├žais. "Friser" to curl.

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    3. I don't think I ever said anything about it being in French. I said it was to a Hamburger. Unless Hamburg moved recently.....

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  22. I found a cryptic crossword with the clue, "More dehydrated than others, hairdresser drops shears" (answer = DRIER), which I think is terrific.

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  23. Last Sunday morning I overlooked the fact that the occupation started with an H. In spite of that oversight, Curtis and zeke helped me find the answer. I guess 'the i/y thing' did kind of throw up a flag; a little bit of cognitive dissonance that I wasn't too concerned about. What does it matter, at the end of the day?





















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  24. Hairdresser/Shears, Drier
    My comment regarding the original movie Westworld related to the fact that its star, Yul Brenner, like me, had little use for a hairdresser.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Actually Yul Brynner (born Yuly Borisovich Briner) was not bald. He shaved his head for his King and I role on Broadway. He had a full head of hair when he allowed it to grow and you can see pictures if you do a Google search.

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    2. OOPS. Hadn't seen pictures of Brynner with hair before. I could have referenced Kojak - but Savalas didn't startshaving his head until 1965..

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  25. HAIRDRESSER, SHEARS, DRIER
    Warren Beatty played a hairdresser in the movie "Shampoo".
    Actor Danny DeVito once worked as a hairdresser.

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  26. My clue - Finally saw through Will's attempt at a puzzle; seems like he will share part of the blame for this one - included two clues: "saw through " referred to "sheer" and "part" referred to "hair"

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  27. And for those eagerly awaiting...."Snipper" came from my kids who like to "snip" each other on their cheeks with pretend finger/hand scissors. Very original. So no hairdresser genes in my blood.

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    Replies
    1. The mystery is solved! That idea did not occur to me, Snipper. I was guessing either hairdresser or mohel.

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  28. And why doesn't a mohel get paid minimum wage?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And how many skin divers does it take to circumcise a whale?

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    2. Just four as long as they are willing to go down on a whale.

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    3. Foreskin divers is the answer.

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    4. I've thought that being a careful mohel must involve a lot of circumspection.

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    5. jan,
      That is what I said above. Four, and since everyone must have heard the joke by now, I didn't spell it out.

      Delete
  29. I may not be a mohel but I am a pianist.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How are you at crosswords? See 23A in tomorrow's New York Times puzzle?

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    2. I belatedly got to see it - right up my alley!

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  30. Replies
    1. Groan. Funny groan, though, jan.

      Latest DT groans, not at all funny. What an entitled creature who feels sexual assault is acceptable.

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    2. ... and who owns fancy hotels, like the Ritz, and admires Vladimir Putin. See, not completely spurious.

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    3. ... and who's gone completely crackers!

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    4. Absolutely. Trump Casino comes down Monday. At least three DT takedowns in a few days (being prescient about tomorrow's debates).

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    5. jan,
      Great video! Quite a balancing act. I would like to see DT try that with a lumber saw.

      Anyway you are reminding me of years ago when the Ritz Cracker ad was all over the place; my younger brother and his wife took a road trip down to California and back. When they returned they said there were variations of Ritz Cracker billboards throughout the state and they came across one that said: Tits-on-a-Ritz-Mmmm-good-cracker. I tried to Google and find one, but no joy and they did not stop to photograph it.

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    6. First Skittles, now Tic Tacs. It's not scary clowns that are screwing up Halloween this year.

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    7. DT is, after all, just a Tic Tac Toad.

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  32. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  33. The give away clue this week was Jan's comment that Snipper has an advantage. I immediately thought of a person who cuts hair. This was confirmed by the, also too obvious, Warren Beatty clue. I just googled "occupation cuts hair" and there was my 11-letter word that starts with H.

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  34. Next week's challenge, from listener Darrell Myers of Somerville, Mass.: Name a famous actress of the past — first and last names, 10 letters altogether. Change one letter in the first name and one letter in the last. The result is a two-word phrase naming a food item often found in a kitchen cabinet or refrigerator. What is it?

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    Replies
    1. I'd say skydiveboy has the unfair advantage this week.

      Delete
  35. I can't stress this enough: limestone.

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    Replies
    1. Could be a concrete clue, but it isn't. To tie into last week, did Belsazar Hacquet go by the nickname Buddy?

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    2. I have a different "stone" in mind.

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    3. SuperZee, everybody must get stoned.

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    4. eco, I enjoyed your elegant riposte!

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  36. Too bad Magdalen is no longer taking predictions of the number of correct entries received. Rachel said there were "a whole lot" this week. Nailed it!

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  37. I've got some deli moose in the back of my fridge somewhere.

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    Replies
    1. Gotta clean that refrigerator more often. I found it hiding behind a ratty cuke.

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    2. What's black and white and red all over? Zebra winges!

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  38. There's a tie-in to a previous puzzle from earlier this year.

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