Sunday, October 09, 2016

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Oct 9, 2016): Grabbing a Bite to Eat Before the Movie

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Oct 9, 2016): Grabbing a Bite to Eat Before the Movie:
Q: Name a famous actress of the past — first and last names, 10 letters altogether. Change one letter in the first name and one letter in the last. The result is a two-word phrase naming a food item often found in a kitchen cabinet or refrigerator. What is it?
I was looking into the yard and the answer came to me.

Edit: Obviously I was looking out the "Rear Window"
A: GRACE KELLY --> GRAPE JELLY

168 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. I have two geologic hints. Limestone is one. The other was mentioned earlier this year in the puzzle.

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    Replies
    1. WW: Blaine says "You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it..."
      I finally figured out this morning that from your limestone hint, you must not. :)

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    2. Mendo Jim, here's my original clue which I thought perhaps was too direct: "I can't stress this enough: limestone."

      Rock and role, of course ;-)



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  3. Ah. This preserves my string of Sundays getting the answer before the show is over. ---Rob

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  4. This week's puzzle is such a blessing for me. Recent weeks have had me all jammed up.

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    Replies
    1. Johanna Denver might have agreed.

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    2. John Denver sang "Thank God I'm A Country Boy." (terrible song, BTW) Johanna would have changed that to "Country Girl." Which is the movie for which Grace won Best Actress Oscar™.

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    3. Henry Willis, I thought that was where you were headed with your clue about the fabulous, amazing (not!) "Thank God I'm a Country Boy." There are a lot of John Denver fans out here, though. . .

      Has anyone seen Grace Kelly in "Country Girl?"

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    4. I did, years ago. I thought Bing, playing an alcoholic performer, was actually more memorable.

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  5. Alternatively, change two different letters and you can find out why the Liverpudlian purchased a media stand.

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  6. I feel sorry for anyone who doesn't get this before Wednesday, or whenever the deadline is.

    A riff from last week's puzzle: Name an occupation in 7 letters. The etymology for that word is something you wouldn't want a person in that occupation to use.

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  7. In true Snipper fashion, I would note the existence of a hair salon bearing the actress's name here in the U.S.

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  8. If my comment does not offend, then I didn't really mean it.

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  9. I like to think that sublety is one of my stronger suits.

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    Replies
    1. Unfortunately, sublety is not an option for me. It's in my lease.

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    2. That's a rare bit, coming from you, Paul.

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  10. Change two letters in the actress's name to help the police find a horse thief.

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    Replies
    1. I can do it with three, but not two.

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    2. Trace filly.
      Whoa! Almost!

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  11. zeke, are you down at the Waffle House?

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    Replies
    1. Marcy and the gang offer you a toast. Sugar creek twp. Salute!

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    2. Thanks, zeke creek. Marcy surely plays a key role in both Sugar Creek and Zeke Creek.

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  12. You won't find this awful food item in my kitchen.

    I don't think this actress had the right gene.

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    Replies
    1. Name a famous actor of the past — first and last names, 10 letters altogether. remove his first name and one letter from his last name to reveal name of a citrus fruit that you might squeeze into a gin and tonic.

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    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    3. Are you hijacking WS's puzzle?

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    4. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    5. Based on how few citrus fruits there are that one might squeeze into a G&T, I wasn't worried.

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  13. I can hardly wait to watch the debate this evening. I hope Hillary brings pepper spray.

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    Replies
    1. I dunno... Donald claimed he could shoot someone on Fifth Avenue and not lose any voters. You don't bring Mace to a gunfight.

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    2. Here's the (slightly edited) description for what I'll be watching tonight:

      Teenagers stumble across a prehistoric caveman, who goes on a rampage. The misunderstood Neanderthal [] falls in love with the daughter. When a frisky [caveman] expresses what seems to be romantic interest in [the teenage girl], her father, fearful that the creature may kill them both if he is rebuffed, suggests she put up with as much of it as she can bear. . The horny caveman has other plans for [her].

      He wears his hair in a ridiculously exaggerated greasy blond pompadour and is presented as something of a teen idol, fawned over by the ladies and prone to engaging banter. [Witnesses consider when the caveman] lolls his tongue around and laps up shaving cream, to be one of the most disgusting things they've witnessed during their time. [Some] speculate that some kind of romantic relationship existed between [the father] and his on-screen daughter [], due to the uncomfortably non-familial chemistry in their scenes together.

      [The caveman] follows them back to civilization, a final confrontation ensues, and he is killed.

      The great thing about [this] is that it's memorably awful. Even for a bad [story], there's something so unique in the dopiness of this strange tale about a caveman loose in the arid wastes of [America]. Once you've seen it, you'll never forget it.

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    3. SDB, I am truly laughing myself sick over your pepper spray comment!!!!

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    4. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    5. Well don't get so ill you are unable to watch this evening to see if she uses it.

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  14. Unlike some here, it took me a few hours from the time I got up this morning to solve it.

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  15. I think the nominee might find himself in a jam tonight.

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  16. Don't have it just yet, and I have to babysit. Would like a hint, but y'all don't always seem to be helpful in this area.

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  17. Dionysus + Medusa = ?

    (Our friend, Word Woman, had something to say on this subject in her blog a few years ago.)

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  18. I gave no hints in the previous post. Like I said, I don't have the answer yet.

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  19. Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. I meant to say, don't get royally P.Od if you can't solve it this week.

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  20. Darrell Myers of Summerville, Mass. can suck it.

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  21. pj: I think you have solved the puzzle.

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  22. Why does everybody think I've solved it when I clearly haven't? You people are insane!

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  23. Just got it! You do have to look up deceased actors and actresses to get this one! Apologies all around for my previous posts. We've been busy babysitting, and my niece kept watching some "Sofia the First" thing on the Kindle, or something like that. As I am writing this, the Kindle is still plugged up and recharging. Again, I apologize. A little preoccupied, I guess you could say.

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  24. I ESPECIALLY apologize to Darrell Myers of Summerville, Mass. Sorry, reality got in the way this evening.

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    Replies
    1. Umm... Somerville. Being a Bostonian - I just could not let this go uncorrected.

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    2. Splitting tufts of hairs...

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    3. I'm sure Darrell (brother 1 or brother 2) feels much better.

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  25. BTW good puzzle, now that I think about it!

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  26. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    Replies
    1. Sorry, zeke creek, that's Google-able.

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    2. Yeah, that was my son's Halloween costume when he was 3 or 4.

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    3. Does this involve a large mammal?

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    4. I thought of Moby Grape and Grape Ape, but the elephant in the room is zeke's deleted comment, which I didn't get to read.

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  27. They had Halloween back then? ;) Thank you for the heads up old friend.

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  28. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    1. What's to say? It's been an interesting election cycle. Moved the New York Times to print obscenities on page 1. But, over all, is it more extraordinary than electing the first woman president? Or the first African-American? Or the first election decided by the Supreme Court? Bill Clinton was impeached, Nixon resigned, Kennedy was assassinated. An apparently endless source of entertainment.

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    2. It was a horrible display for our country and for the world to see.

      I enjoyed the question about energy from the guy in the red sweater and hated the lurking over Hillary Clinton by DT.

      I thought the moderators could have asked DT another question to clarify about the "locker room talk" vs. sexual assault. But, DT would not have answered that anyway because he doesn't see his behavior as illegal. Disturbing.

      DT's comments about jailing Mrs. Clinton were quite distressing.

      At least they ended on a positive note. Though, DT's previous wives get most of the credit for raising the kids.




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    3. Hmm. I kinda figured it was Fran Drescher. Or Greenwich Village. Or Aleppo. A pox on me!

      Who gets the debit?

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  29. Replies
    1. You have to ask yourself what the founding fathers would say about the debate.

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    2. Dueling pistols might have been involved. Anyway, they wouldn't have let a woman vote, no less debate.

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    3. If DT won that awful debate, I don't see how he could have changed anyone's mind or picked up many votes.

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    4. Did the founding fathers anticipate people 'running' for the presidency? My father, on numerous occasions, questioned why anyone would want the job.

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  30. It wasn't really a debate, but an unsurprising argument between two of the most unattractive and least qualified candidates in US history. And not moderated, but egged on.
    Then scores of talking heads jabbering ad nauseum about what we should think about it.
    What I think is that we are screwed.

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    Replies
    1. Although I am a Democrat and prefer to have Bernie Sanders on the ticket because I am not all that happy with the Clinton politics, I think it is complete nonsense to say Hillary Clinton is not qualified to be president. She is probably the most qualified candidate for this office ever. She was married to a president who was in office for eight years and very involved during that time, and then she was a U.S. Senator and then Secretary of State for 4 years. Be realistic.

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    2. What I find most interesting about Trump is that he resides in Trump Tower. It seems to me he would be much more comfortable if he moved into one of the many trailer parks scattered around the country. Perhaps one in Idaho or Nevada. That way he would most likely find lots of friends who share his way of thinking.

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    3. Well, excuuuuse me.
      She was married to a lousy president, was herself a lousy senator and fell far short of both those standards as secretary of state.
      Do you like war, SDB? Hillary does.

      I am through supporting the slightly better of two bad choices. It got us here where we are today and I helped.

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    4. I have always been adamantly against war, and that is one of the major complaints I have about Clinton, but that has zero to do with her qualifications for the office. You are adding apples and oranges.

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    5. Attractiveness, Mendo Jim, really?

      Hillary Clinton is, as Obama and sbd noted, the most qualified candidate for U.S. President ever.

      I wonder why DT rarely talks about his mom and always credits his dad, not his parents, for all those loans.

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    6. Sure, at times I think HC might be the lesser of two evils but just look back to Georgie W. and his henchmen, and she doesn't look too bad.
      Who knows what the future may bring but I sure would feel very nervous with DT at the helm when it comes to him being in control of our armed forces and nuclear stockpile.
      Besides, as I see it, DT would put himself in charge of the high-profile PR duties and glamour jobs leaving Pence in charge of the day to day legislative chores. Now that would be a true disaster!

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    7. You should know, WORD Woman, that attractiveness need have nothing to do with physical appearance.
      And, as we will all find out, Hillary is not going to be a good president, unless you have a lot of money and think American exceptionalism is good for children and other living things.
      You lamented no debate talk and I regret speaking up.
      This is really after all not the place for such a discussion.

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    8. This IS the place for this discussion. Nothing is more important than how we choose our leaders. Not even the NPR puzzle. Or perhaps you have a public square where you live so people can meet and discuss important things in public, but I doubt it.

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    9. We go here often, Mendo Jim. I enjoy hearing intelligent people's viewpoints on many topics.

      "Attractiveness" simply seems too charged a term to use this go 'round. Yes, of course it does not always apply to physical characteristics.



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    10. I am agreeing with sdb twice in one day--a new record ;-).

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    11. WW:
      The math works the same in both directions in such cases. :-)

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  31. NOT A CLUE: is Blaine overlooking the Veronica "Lake" plants in his yard ?

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    1. SORT OF A CLUE: Somehow, I thought he was referring to Joan Crawford.

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    2. I thought maybe Blaine was looking out his back door instead of his rear window. [J. C.]

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  32. Hillary has plenty of experience for the job, a lot of it not so good. But we in California have the luxury of the Electoral College to let us vote our conscience.

    While the fall of the short-fingered vulgarian is a joy to see, I worry more about the Republican's Operation Crosscheck, mostly behind the scenes, to remove people's registration, where the real voter fraud is occurring. If you live in one of the states identified here, make sure you are still registered. And make sure folks who are in minority communities haven't had their rights stolen. In many ways (and for only 1 reason) this clever and illegal campaign is aimed at them.

    With some careful kerning does debate become debacle?

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    Replies
    1. Crosscheck is seriously scary.

      Not risking my vote here in the swing state of CO.

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    2. As long as we're going down this road, let me put in a word for National Popular Vote. We're already more than halfway to eliminating the Electoral College dominance of a handful of states.

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    3. Compelling arguments for the National Popular Vote, jan.

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    4. While a national popular vote is more democratic, I think we would be wiser to have a Constitutional Amendment to ensure it's longevity. I worry that while the folks at NPV may be right that an Amendment is not required, as each state legislature chooses its method for selecting Electors, there's way too much room for hanky-panky. Suppose California (or NY, etc) chooses its Electors distribution based on popular vote, and the Dem wins in a landslide with 65% of the vote. 34 for the Dem, 19 for the Repub. But should Texas and a bunch of Repub states revert to winner take all (which they might do at the last minute, leaving other states no time to change their rules), the Dem's will lose the White House.

      Big advantage of the Electoral College: if you live in a solid blue (or red) state you aren't tortured with the advertising!

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    5. I believe the NPV bills are worded to prevent the scenario you describe. The award of a state's Electoral votes to the winner of the national popular vote is binding only if states with a majority of Electoral votes comply. If enough states renege or fail to adopt NPV, you're just left with the current Electoral College system.

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  33. What has me most worried, now that Trump has seemingly shot himself with the silver bullet and Hillary Clinton will most likely win, is that she is also very unpopular and will most likely have a very tough time getting a second term even if she frees the world of nuclear weapons, ends war and solves climate change. The people of this country are very stupid in general. This is self evident by their presidential choices in the past along with their continuing admiration of Ronald Reagan and even George W. Bush and Nixon too for that matter. For some incomprehensible reason the public is driven, like lemmings to the cliff, to change parties periodically for no logical reason. People are very dissatisfied in this country, and in many cases for the wrong reasons, as most here are probably aware. Trump is an obvious clown, as was Hitler, but Paul Ryan is not so obvious to the masses, but is still just as evil and destructive. This is what has me worried the most at the moment. Our most pressing problems now are nuclear proliferation and climate change. Did you hear them discussed in any of the debates? Remember Easter Island. I suspect it was the canary in the mine.

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    Replies
    1. See you Thursday, Brother Lemming.

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  34. Replies
    1. And apparently, Trump himself was a fan of the film, so the similarity may not be a coincidence.

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    2. It absolutely IS a coincidence. It may not be MERELY a coincidence.
      Please excuse me; I'm a stickler about this sort of thing.

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    3. coincidence: a remarkable concurrence of events or circumstances without apparent causal connection.

      I don't think it's a coincidence.

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    4. I just found the time to read the first parts of the coincidence article and found it unconvincing for the most part. It is correct about meeting people with the same birthday and name and simple things like that, but I have had a lifetime of totally unbelievable coincidences that are far more complex and astounding than those the author is talking about. I run into people with my birth date frequently and never considered it much of a coincidence, especially when I found I was born on April 3, which is nine months after the Fourth of July. Not nearly enough room here for me to go into detail about even one of my startling coincidences.

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    5. I'll take the room that SDB left. During the filming of The Wizard of Oz, when the wardrobe department was looking for a coat for Frank Morgan (Professor Marvel / The Wizard), they decided they wanted one that looked like it had once been elegant but had since "gone to seed." They visited a second-hand store and purchased an entire rack of coats, from which Morgan, the head of the wardrobe department, and director Victor Fleming chose one they felt gave off the perfect appearance of "shabby gentility." One day, while he was on set in the coat, Morgan idly turned out one of the pockets and discovered a label indicating that the coat had been made for L. Frank Baum.

      Mary Mayer, a unit publicist for the film, contacted the tailor and Baum's widow, who both verified that the coat had at one time been owned by the author of the original "Wizard of Oz" books. After the filming was completed, the coat was presented to Mrs. Baum.While this blurb is taken from IMDB, you can find this and many more details about the making of that movie in Aljean Harmetz's book of the same name.

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    6. "Especially when I found I was born on April 3. . ." When did you find this sdb? Was it a shock? ;-)

      Enjoyed the coat story, Henry Willis.

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    7. Btw, if you use a Due Date Calculator, conception on 7/4 correlates with a due date of 3/27. Very close to 4/3, of course, and babies rarely look at the calendar when being born.

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  35. After going out to take pictures with my long lens on my camera, I came up with the answer. The fact that it took me so long to find the answer is a crime.

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  36. Late clue: change one letter in the first word and you'll get ... oh, never mind.

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    Replies
    1. eco, I think you're groping for hints now.

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    2. As Norma Rae said, "Kvetch, kvetch, kvetch!"

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  37. My bd is March 29. Never thought about July 4th connection. Interesting.

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    Replies
    1. GRACE KELLY >>> GRAPE JELLY

      "I can't stress this enough: limestone." >>> Limestone under pressure becomes Marble as in the Elgin Marbles as in Georgie Elgin, GRACE KELLY'S Oscar-winning role in "The Country Girl."

      "I have two geologic hints. Limestone is one. The other was mentioned earlier this year in the puzzle." >>> See above; MIKA who sings "GRACE KELLY" refers to the recent "Micas" answer.

      "I like to think that sublety is one of my stronger suits." referred to changing my thumbnail photo to an image of home-made peach preserves, somewhat close to grape jelly.

      The Waffle House banter with zeke creek referred to rapper JELLY Roll's lawsuit with that restaurant.

      Grammarians all: role vs. roll >>> GRACE KELLY role vs. JELLY roll (see above).

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    2. Limestone! Of course. I was only three or four links on the chain short.

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    3. On this blog, I often long to be only 3 or 4 links short.

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    4. Sandwich stratigraphy looks like fun, jan. I also thought of the JELLYBEAN CONGLOMERATE.

      Mendo Jim, clearly you need more stress in your life ;-).

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    5. I thought the limestone was the Kelly limestone formation in New Mexico. Everything I read after New Mexico was unconsolidated metamorphic sediment.

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    6. Hmm, eco, unconsolidated sediment would tend to metamorphose into metamorphic rock, so "unconsolidated metamorphic sediment" would be very unusual.

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    7. My remembering what I learned in 8th grade geology would be even more unusual.

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  38. GRACE KELLY > GRAPE JELLY

    My Hint: “I don't think this actress had the right gene.” Hinting at Gene Kelly.

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  39. Grace Kelly, grape jelly

    Last Sunday I said, “Unlike some here, it took me a few hours from the time I got up this morning to solve it.” Actually it took me ‘til High Noon featuring Grace Kelly.

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  40. I wrote, "This preserves my string of Sundays getting the answer before the show is over," punning on "preserves" and "jelly." ---Rob

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  41. Mount Rainier is in the Cascade Range.

    does not offend / didn't really mean it; PC / JK; Gra_e _elly

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  42. GRACE KELLY -> GRAPE JELLY

    > I'd say skydiveboy has the unfair advantage this week.

    Seattle is rainier than most cities, and it's not far from Mt. Rainier.

    > Too bad Magdalen is no longer taking predictions of the number of correct entries received. Rachel said there were "a whole lot" this week. Nailed it!

    Pinning down the exact number of correct entries is like trying to nail jelly to a tree.

    > Dionysus + Medusa = ?

    Grape jellyfish

    > Our friend, Word Woman, had something to say on this subject in her blog a few years ago.

    Talking about purple jellies, and closing with a line from Friendship about what to do in a jam.

    >> Who's purple and conquered the world, ww?
    > Yeah, that was my son's Halloween costume when he was 3 or 4.

    We just attached a lot of purple balloons to Alex's pajamas, and he went as Alexander the Grape.

    >>> Late clue: change one letter in the first word and you'll get ... oh, never mind.
    >> eco, I think you're groping for hints now.
    > As Norma Rae said, "Kvetch, kvetch, kvetch!"

    I thought "Gripe" would be too much of a giveaway.

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    Replies
    1. Yeah, it may have been a bit of a giveaway but at the 11th hour, all jell(y) breaks loose.

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    2. I resisted the temptation to say folks would whine about this puzzle.

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  43. Maybe when Bill Cosby goes to trial he will call Donald Trump to testify as a character witness.

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  44. G'mar Hatima Tova to those observing Yom Kippur.

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  45. I feel sorry for anyone who doesn't get this before Wednesday:
    Tuesday's child is full of grace,
    Wednesday's child is full of woe,


    And of course changing one letter in grape gets you grope, which is really just Trump's way of reaching out to voters, at least half of them.

    Too soon?

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    3. Not to open a can of worms, maybe just crack it open a bit, but 'Citizen Kane' will be on late tonight at 12:30 am central time.

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    4. How we've changed from "Hope" to "Hope to Grope"

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    5. Latest from Donald Trump: his favorite Shakespearean character is Ophelia.

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  46. Like the rest of you, I had Grace Kelly...Grape Jelly
    The answer to my rip-off puzzle, about helping to find a stolen horse was Trace Nelly

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  47. GRACE KELLY>>>GRAPE JELLY

    I have been away on holiday, but I solved this one last Sunday. Seemed pretty easy and I was sure there would be lots of “jam” clues.

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    1. "Jam" was the give away clue this week. I immediately recognized it as a key word, since it's almost never used in conversation. This led directly to jelly, then grape jelly. "Preserves" and "Waffle house" were more elegant, but not give aways. As usual, I have no idea what Blaine's clue means.

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    2. Poor jam has gotten taken over by traffic and printer.

      My guess is that Blaine has a wonderful grape arbor in his backyard. Take that bet or Welch on it.

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    3. Didn't Charles Dickens make wine in his spare time and write Grape Expectations?

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    4. Have you carved your Trumpkin yet? Perfect coloring. . .

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    5. You have now just gone and spoiled my Halloween. :-)

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    6. But, it makes the smashing pumpkins event afterwards sooooo satisfying, sdb.

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    7. Couldn't open the cartoon, jan.

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    8. Hmmm. It's a Gregory cartoon from The New Yorker. A doctor sitting at his desk, diplomas on the wall behind him. Sitting on a chair facing him is a pumpkin. The doctor says, "It's a very simple procedure. We slice off the top of your head, scoop out your innards with a spoon, and carve out your eyes and mouth."

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    9. To Blaine's clue, I assumed he was looking out the Rear Window. If it's locked is there a special Stewart Jimmy?

      Trumpkins are all the rage this year, in so many ways. I like the simplicity of this one.

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    10. The hair is perfect on the simple one. . .

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  48. Replies
    1. I knew you had the answer, but had to get the clue royally po'd in for Princess Grace. Also being blessed this week, blessed=grace, and jammed up, which I thought would be booted.

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  49. David, who comments often on Blaine's blog, has contributed NINE (!) wonderful puzzles to this week's Puzzleria!... which has just now been uploaded.
    Click "Joseph Young's Puzzlria!" on Blaine's Puzzle Links.

    In addition to David's gems are eight other not-so-gems, including three that involve very recent news headlines.

    LegoShillmeister

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  50. Not to put too fine a point on it, but anyone notice the latest Trump scandals:

    - general denigration of women
    - allowing his daughter to be called a piece of [less polite term for donkey]
    - barging in on beauty pageant contestants in the dressing room
    - implicitly accepting the moniker of sexual predator and calling women he's slept with "victims"


    all have the common theme of originating on the Howard Stern Show? Are Stern and Robin Quivers the new Mike Wallace and Morley Safer?

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    1. Uggh. DT: "I am a victim." And how can he make the word "energy" sound sleazy?!

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    2. It fits perfectly with a narcissistic personality disorder. He can't take the blame for anything, whatever good that happens is because of him, and all things bad are because of somebody else. It's remarkable how much this is echoing with Hitler; when things turned in Russia it was always the fault of the generals (read: RNC, Paul Ryan etc). In the dying days of the 3rd Reich some asked Hitler to give relief to the citizens in Berlin, and he more or less responded that anyone who hadn't died fighting didn't deserve to live. Or something to that effect.

      My fear is that when DT loses he will not go down gracefully, as every other candidate in our history has done. Unlike every other loser he will question the legitimacy of the election (yes, Al Gore had real complaints) and he will rally his followers into something unsavory. And dangerous.

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    3. Someday, maybe in the distant future, three guys are going to be in a basement of Trump Tower cleaning up whats left of the Donald's empire, shoveling old things into the incinerator. One will pick up an old stuffed animal and showing it to the second guy asks "I wonder what was so great about this?". The second guy will pause for a second and say "who knows it's just a little kitty cat, I'd pitch it with the rest of this stuff"! And so, the the dynasty will come to an end...


      But then, the third guy says "maybe we can give it to some kid who can respect this kind of thing"!


      Well, maybe there's some hope in this world!

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    4. eco: Your scenario may well be prophetic.
      It is likely the talking yam will lose, but that won't bother his supporters at all since it was fixed, of course.
      As I said months ago and this week the chances are overwhelming that we are screwed.

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    5. “If she’s in office, I hope we can start a coup. She should be in prison or shot. That’s how I feel about it,” Dan Bowman, a 50-year-old contractor, said of Hillary Clinton, the Democratic nominee. “We’re going to have a revolution and take them out of office if that’s what it takes. There’s going to be a lot of bloodshed. But that’s what it’s going to take. . . . I would do whatever I can for my country.”

      Not even the scariest part of this article.

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    6. The whole thing is very, very scary!

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    7. The whole thing is very, very scary!

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  51. Next week's challenge: This is a two-week challenge. Take the digits 5, 4, 3, 2 and 1, in that order. Using those digits and the four arithmetic signs — plus, minus, times and divided by — you can get 1 with the sequence 5 - 4 + 3 - 2 - 1. You can get 2 with the sequence (5 - 4 + 3 - 2) x 1.

    The question is ... how many numbers from 1 to 40 can you get using the digits 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1 in that order along with the four arithmetic signs?

    You can group digits with parentheses, as in the example. There are no tricks to this, though. It's a straightforward puzzle. How many numbers from 1 to 40 can you get — and, specifically, what number or numbers can you not get? I'll reveal my solution in two weeks.

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    1. Not much to talk about this week. But all that "5, 4, 3, 2, 1" reminded me of something.

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    2. My favorite Tom Lehrer quote: "Political satire became obsolete when Henry Kissinger was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize."

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