Sunday, July 23, 2017

NPR Sunday Puzzle (July 23, 2017): Pat Sajak and Vanna White

NPR Sunday Puzzle (July 23, 2017): Pat Sajak and Vanna White:
Q: What common three-word expression — 14 letters in all — has only N and G as consonants, and otherwise is all vowels?
I'm not sure Will Shortz has hit a homerun with this puzzle.

Edit: Some announcers might say this as the ball is heading over the wall.
A: GOING, GOING, GONE!

246 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Giving the puzzle two days early is hint enough.  I am out of here.   ---Rob

    ReplyDelete
  3. This week's challenge is so easy it's lame... several song titles.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Guess it's not A GENUINE EUGENE puzzle like last week.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, it's NO EUGENE ONEGIN puzzle like last week.

      Delete
  5. There's an automotive expression that's one letter too long.

    ReplyDelete
  6. This is a puzzle? Say it ain't so, Will.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I sense a wee bit of sarcasm in your comment, SDB.

      Delete
    2. Gee, I didn't think anyone would notice.

      Delete
  7. On the radio, over the crackling crowd noise, comes the voice of Mel Allen...

    ReplyDelete
  8. I think I have a plausible alternative answer, but I won't boast about it, for obvious reasons.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Rob – Great performance combining style, personality, wit and puzzle mastery. Congrats!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, just the right blend of all those things, Rob!

      Delete
    2. Golly, thanks. My biggest worry was disappointing my Blaine's friends. ---Rob

      Delete
    3. Nice job indeed, Rob. May have been easier if Will had said "crazy Western author". I was waiting for him to ask "fake communicator".

      Since you have their contact, a suggestion for true randomization: can they export the emails received into a .pst or .csv file, put numbers to the individual emails, and then use a random number generator? Free one at random.org says it is more random than others...

      Delete
    4. I did recommend that their computer assign a number to each response when it sends out the auto-reply. It would be easy to pick a random one then.

      Of course, until they do so, send in answers at 2:45 pm on Thursday.

      Delete
    5. I was not at all disappointed with your performance. I was impressed. You did us proud, Rob.

      LegoSaysRobGotTheJobDone

      Delete
    6. Rob, Amazing job! Congratulations! WS knew that one answer because it was right in front of him not because he loves that group, I don't think. So funny!!

      Delete
  10. I guess the answer isn't an aging engine.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, it's ANY AGING ENGINE.

      Delete
    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    4. Oh, right; it needs 14 letters. And both spellings, aging and ageing are technically correct. 😉

      Delete
  11. Nor does it involve an engine gauge, goonie eggnog, or iguana guano.

    ReplyDelete
  12. For once I actually understand Blaine's hint, which must mean it's too easy, as are others, IMHO.

    Violin Teddy, in response to your surprise at the end of last week's thread: I remember everything except what I forget.

    And since many will spend little time evaluating the puzzle and more time thinking about WHEN to submit, it's time for some Bonus Puzzles:

    Below are some slightly less common expressions — 14 letters in all — with only N and G as consonants, and otherwise are all vowels. I'm nicer than WS, so I've given clues for each.

    1. Response by some to last week's answer (you can cheat and look at my post on last week's thread, or Ron's post above).
    2. Possible heart attack symptom
    3. Bad response to a vegetable
    4. Knuckle head
    5. Single authentic architectural curve
    6. Major Nelson event, October 7, 1969
    7. Harry Morgan character hasn't changed for 50 years
    8. Assessing certain symphony conductor
    9. San Francisco bank founder joins bad group
    10. Effect of #9 for group
    11. Foolish Polynesian governess
    12. Bad time at Japanese hotel
    13. Bored once more at mid-day

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    2. 14. He's not for putting on weight: GNU AGIN GAINING.

      Delete
    3. 15. A Greek that gets on your nerves

      Delete
  13. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    2. No, I mean what’s the point? They aren’t going to change it.

      Delete
    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    4. Natasha,

      I wish you wouldn't feel compelled to remove your posts. I appreciate that you took the time to state your displeasure to NPR for their method for selecting a winner.

      To Buck Bard: the point is that if people complain they (NPR) might actually do something about it. I've got to believe the complaints about their "extra" guest player nipped that in the bud, to use an SDB line.

      The NPR intern told Rob last week that they had considered changing their unfortunate method for choosing the winner, they just haven't found the technology that allowed them to do it easily. With some pushing maybe they will.

      We know Will Schortz visits this blog once in a while; I doubt he knows the techno fix, but he may have some influence.

      Delete
    5. Eco, Thank you for your comment. I just get tired of seeing my comments. They are meant for the moment anyway.

      Delete
  14. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  15. This can’t be that easy, can it? I’m going back to my Lovejoy DVDs

    ReplyDelete
  16. I'd hate to risk aggravating Fran Drescher.

    ReplyDelete
  17. These hints are giving away the puzzle.

    ReplyDelete
  18. The answer summarizes the progression of last week's thread.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Kind of like my summer tan right now....

    ReplyDelete
  20. I may be leaving, that much is true.
    And when I do, I won't be here with you.

    ReplyDelete
  21. No Trump. (Not a political statement, this time.)

    ReplyDelete
  22. Not that I'm one to judge lately, but the puzzle is easy and some clues above make it easier.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I agree, Snipper, this week's clues are especially eg_egiou_.

      Delete
  23. I had to think about it, think about it.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I almost had ON AGAIN, OFF AGAIN, but that's 15 letters and contains two F's. But I got it right away!

    ReplyDelete
  25. Isn't it funny how last week's answer and this week's both involve N, G, and a few vowels? It's as though we're still stuck ON EUGENE ONEGIN!

    ReplyDelete
  26. Replies
    1. It needs to be THREE words in 14 letters: AN ENGAGING GOON.

      Delete
    2. A GUNNING ENGINE
      The longest phrase I can think of with just N, G, and vowels is ANGINA AGAIN NAGGING AN AGING INGENUE.

      Delete
  27. Will had a ball with this puzzle.

    ReplyDelete
  28. I know I often suggest things that I wish Will Shortz would do improve the Sunday Puzzle.
    This week I wish he had made an effort to learn how to pronounce Onegin.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. He pronounced it the way it is commonly pronounced in this country.

      Delete
    2. Sometimes, Mendo Jim, you get your nail in a twat over nothing.

      Delete
    3. I intended to ask you if would have brought up your knowledge of pronunciation in the "explanation' you promised last Tuesday to post after the deadline.
      It is not too late to make that post about the novel's importance and and wide-spread popularity.

      It has, however, become time for you to stop your weird personal attacks on me.

      Delete
    4. Kind of a silly thing to get in a tiff about, gents. Yes, WS could have learned how to pronounce Onegin correctly, it only took seconds for me (er, Google) to learn how.

      And now that I've learned it I'm sure I'll be the hit at every party; probably get an invite to Colbert or Kimmel.

      Let's go back to trashing Trump, not each other. Where's GB? I don't get to hear from that side of the world so often.

      Delete
    5. Mendo Jim:

      I assume you mean this post:

      skydiveboy Tue Jul 18, 04:56:00 PM PDT

      It's actually rather common and popular, MJ, but I can't explain further until the deadline Thursday.

      I was referring to the novel later being made into an opera that is very popular and performed frequently. I find it difficult to believe anyone raised in this country would not have heard of it.

      As to "personal attacks." I think you are being overly sensitive, and I suggest you look for the intended humor in my posts, rather than getting upset over anyone here commenting on your never ending petty complaints which you leave yourself open to in my opinion.

      Delete
  29. There isn't anyone other than a member of the Trump Cabinet who could not solve this idiotic puzzle within two minutes, so why is anyone here concerned by revealing hints?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Because, Harriet, we need to follow the rules. Whether by Master Blaine or MastaDon, you must comply.

      Delete
    2. Very funny, eco, and how dare you call me a Harriet? Never mind, you are now on my this list, or is that my hits list? Oh well just anagram it.

      Delete
    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    4. I am on your Sith List. Join me, young Sith Darth Bane and together we shall RULE THE BLOG!

      Delete
    5. I am ready to lure the glob with you, sigher.

      Delete
    6. SDB: What's so idiotic about this puzzle?

      Delete
    7. When Rob posted it last Thursday, and I read it and solved it almost instantly, I felt disappointment because I did not see anything challenging about it. For me it is not a puzzle at all. I like to be challenged by a puzzle.

      Here is a puzzle I came up with after watching the Cohen Brothers' recent movie, Hail Caesar!, this weekend. It is a wonderful film in my opinion, and I recommend it highly. They made a major error having to do with the plot. I suspect very few will notice it however. I find it forgivable as the movie is so well made otherwise, but they could have worked around this error and still made it work. I can reveal the answer later, but please feel free to post whatever you may think it is if you have seen the movie.

      Delete
    8. It's a funny thing, SDB rants when the puzzle is too easy, PJ Cranberry rants when it's too hard. Does that make them rants-id?

      This puzzle is easy, and the answer is a little disappointing. I don't think it's bad, but it's not stimulating much intelligence.

      Speaking of lack of stimulating intelligence, have you seen the clip from which Blaine grabbed his image? Pretty funny, says much about intelligence in America.

      Delete
    9. No, eco, we are not from the same mold.

      The Car Talk Puzzler is a good one this week and reminds me of my first two cars, which were not VW's.

      Delete
    10. I'd say you are mirror images.

      I haven't seen Hail Caesar!, but I do see an error in the puzzle as you stated it....

      Delete
    11. Not sure what you mean, but the error in the film is a plot device that is not possible given the situation.

      Delete
    12. Your mistake is the writers/ directors are the Coen Brothers, not Cohen.

      Imdb.com lists 47 "goofs" in the film; some are minor, some significant. Is yours among them?

      Delete
    13. When I first typed my post I spelled it Coen, but spell check doesn't like that. I was going to check to be sure, but clicked on spell check first and went with their offering. Damn spell check!

      I just finished reading all those errors in the movie and I think I only noticed one of them. Mine is not included.

      Delete
  30. I shouldn't have let last week's puzzle get to me, I know. If I'd found the right website soon enough, it would've been all right. As for SDB's problem, I wouldn't know what's up with him.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Just tell yourself that it's only a puzzle. If not being able to solve the puzzle was the worst thing that happened to you last week, you had a really good week.

      Delete
  31. Getting back to this week's puzzle, I am reminded of the Sunday cryptograms in the Birmingham News growing up. Contributor Norton Rhoades had a similar entry in which the whole thing was made up of only the letters R, E, A, and D. It went like this:
    DREAD DREAR ERA: RARE RED DEER ARE DEAD.
    Also an easy solve.

    ReplyDelete
  32. My lapel pin (but not the Scrabble game, etc.) came in the mail today. Fast work!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Congrats! I received the Scrabble game right away, but nothing else. I had to send two emails to NPR and a phone call to my local NPR station in order to get my pin. I still have not received the other stuff, but I don't want it anyway. I keep meaning to offer the Scrabble game on Craig's List. I sold the pin for $100 the day after I received it.

      Delete
    2. Wow! $100? That little thing?

      Delete
    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    4. Natasha:
      You cannot force others to share your personal values. I do my own thinking.

      Delete
    5. You took this the wrong way. I thought you did an amazing job on air. Did you auction it off? Will explain thursday.

      Delete
    6. It is a long story. My brother told me a friend of his very much wanted the pin for her brother and would give a hundred dollars for it. It means nothing to me and I would never wear it. It was a win for all involved and I am happy it now has a good home. The full story is much more interesting.

      Delete
    7. I won't wear mine, either. It is now pinned to the string that suspends the US Naval Academy clock (alumnus here) on the wall in my basement weight room, and I am proud of it.

      Delete
    8. When I received my lapel pin in the mail, it arrived bent. I contacted NPR and they sent me another one, so now I have two pins.

      Delete
  33. A magician decided to incorporate garlic into her act. She crushed the garlic, added roasted pine nuts and basil, then threw in some parmesan cheese and . . .pesto!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A certain unnamed president, who thought he had magical powers, tried to inappropriately touch a woman's upper torso. But he felt something in the way, and asked, "What's this?" She replied "A bra, cad, a bra."

      What it lacks in humor and good taste it makes up for in originality.

      Delete
    2. Any boob could've come up with that one.

      Delete
    3. We could meld them together into "Breast-o!"

      Delete
    4. I guess that wasn't SDB's cup of tea*.

      Delete
    5. What udder nonsense, don't you want to play, Tex? I guess I've been busted.

      Delete
    6. I think we milked that for all it's worth.

      Delete
    7. Probably went too far, we lacked a shun of this.

      Delete
    8. As they say in Las Vegas, "Why quit now? Let's go for bust!"

      Delete
    9. As she said on burning her bra, "The breast things in life are free."

      Delete
  34. Folks, stop playing tit for tat.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Any one of these breast puns could win the booby prize! Thanks for the mammaries!

    ReplyDelete
  36. There are multiple avenues to solving this week's puzzle. And, by now, I dare say we've touched them all.

    ReplyDelete
  37. My deluxe Scrabble game came via carrier yesterday. Very efficient. I await my NYT book of crosswords.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rob-
      I would be very interested in knowing if you ever receive the NYT book of crosswords. Even though I mentioned to NPR that mine did not come when I had to practically beg for them to send me the lousy pin. I do not play crosswords and do not want the book, but their failure to meet their obligations has soured me on my experience, just when I was feeling more supportive. Lego also has not received his Scrabble, and I suspect the book either. He did get the pin. Others here have also had dismal experiences of not receiving their loot. It makes me wonder what the percentage is of on-line players having had similar problems getting their swag.

      Most seem to believe NPR is doing us a favor by inviting us to play on-air with Will Shortz. I see it the other way around. They need us in order for this segment to work, and they pay us off with this pin. It is much like the military buying us off who serve with their worthless medals. My experience with never receiving my Good Conduct Medal is similar. Again, I do not want it, and would not accept it should it suddenly appear in my mail after over fifty years, and I have never felt any pride in my service.

      Delete
    2. Yes, I will certainly let you know when the book comes. (I don't do Scrabble or crosswords, but will use them for presents.) I just let people know about the lapel pin and Scrabble because it seems that my experience with those, at least, is at variance with the experiences of other winners here.

      Delete
    3. For what it is worth, I have twice won the distinguished "Email of the Week" prize from AWAD but have never gotten whatever it was they were giving away that week. I always thought that these illusory prizes were a fitting reward for the hard work of sending in an email that they could publish. Much like the old Soviet-era joke: "They pretend to pay us and we pretend to work."

      Delete
    4. It seems to me that Rob is getting things much quicker that I did... maybe they have gotten that side of things straightened out. --Margaret G.

      Delete
  38. NPR NEEDS TO GET RID OF INTERN. MAYBE TRUMP COULD DO IT FOR THEM.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Natasha - Maybe there could be a job for Jared Kushner after all!

      Delete
    2. Wouldn't trust him with it; all the winners would be from Russia.

      Delete
    3. I meant DT could fire the internsince he is firing so many people lately. (In case I was not clear in comment above.)

      Delete
  39. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Here's an interesting website that shows how much of a percentage you can see of the upcoming solar eclipse, partial or full, based on the address you input. It gives you the percentage of a partial eclipse and the length of time for a total one. 
    It will give you the option of a .pdf copy for $20, but you don't have to do that if you don't want to. It is supposed to be pretty accurate.
    From my house, it will be a partial view at over 99%, so I am looking forward to it!

    ReplyDelete
  41. 68C: I think the consensus is that the short trip from 99% to 100% totality would be very well worth it.

    I would have a ten hour trip one way even without the expected traffic jam (perhaps starting in Eugene, Oregon), so I will have to miss it.

    There has not been a total solar eclipse within easy reach of me in 76 years.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mendo Jim - That's too bad about not being able to see the full eclipse. Even if you might be able to see 50%, that would be pretty cool.
      I'll be watching the news updates in the next few weeks for traffic predictions. Some of the early reports from the KS & MO Highway Patrols are predicting gridlock on the main highways. So, we'll see!
      In St. Joseph, MO., the C/L of totality, stores are giving away those cheap eclipse glasses away for free. Even by me, they're selling for $1.
      Anyway, I need to plan for that day carefully so we won't get trapped with either a bad view, stuck in traffic, or both!!

      Delete
    2. I do not trust, and will have nothing to do with, an eclipse that cannot withstand the light of day! I believe in openness, and refuse to have anything to do with shady operations.

      Delete
    3. SDB - "Only the shadow knows" when it will appear!

      A neighbor down the street has an eclipse that he still makes payments on!

      Delete
    4. Won't the TV stations cover it?

      Delete
    5. No, there will be "a blackout" imposed, naturally...

      I still think that it will be neat to see in person, even if it is only a partial one.

      Delete
    6. Everything I've heard says it is really worth it to get to the path of totality.

      I'm 2 hours farther than MJ, but I'm planning to drive 13 hours and camp out, probably in Idaho where the weather is likely to be clear, and the crowds fewer. Coastal Oregon is not the safest viewing spot.

      68C there was an article in the WaPo yesterday about crowds, they warned about waiting until the last minute, especially in the crowded east and coastal areas, but even KS and MO will get big crowds.

      Make a long weekend out of it! And SDB will just have to stay in the dark. Traditionally eclipses were omens for catastrophe, thank goodness that won't happen!

      Delete
    7. eco:
      I take it you will not be following the Shining Path?
      Exactly where in Idaho are you intending to camp? I have been contemplating a road trip to Walla Walla and perhaps could go further, or maybe even farther. I will be camping too. If we meet we could even compare tent sizes.

      Delete
    8. Eco - Sounds like you've got a great plan! I've heard that the view can be even more spectacular the closer you are to it at sunrise. I guess that's why Oregon is going to be in big demand. Even at 11:20 am in Idaho, the difference might be pretty big compared to around 1:10 pm for me. 
      I only have to drive 15-20 miles to get to an area of totality so depending on traffic, it shouldn't be too bad (famous last words).

      Delete
    9. SDB - I will be following the Reverend Moon that day.

      You do know that Walla Wall will remain in light? This map is the best tracker I've seen.

      I'm leaning towards Sawtooth National Forest, seems like the rugged terrain would make a nice backdrop, and I hope fewer crowds than other places. Camping is the only option, but campgrounds that take reservations are already booked, one can hope to find a spot in a first come first served campground (I'm hoping to get there several days earlier). The fallback is wilderness camping.

      68C - cool photo, if one could trust the Oregon Coast to be anything but cloudy it would be tempting. Lucky you that you have a short drive, but they all say start early. If I were in your place I'd also be checking the weather forecasts in the days before; my memories from St Louis is the storms usually don't start until late afternoon, but ....

      I think we're all in for a treat.

      Delete
    10. The NASA site for the eclipse has some very useful state-by-state maps.

      Helen and I will drive from our home in Dayton to Kentucky to see it, if it looks as if the weather will cooperate. I'm excited.

      Delete
    11. eco,
      I was not intending to go to Walla Walla for the eclipse, but for wine tasting, etc. I will be camping out too.

      Delete
  42. It appears when it comes to the military Trump is the only one who can change.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I guess his presidency is a tran wreck.

      Delete
  43. Am I the only one here who is a longtime NPR listener, but is getting increasingly fed up with the nonstop, shameless begging that is only rivaled by the obnoxious advertisements with their smarmy taglines? It did not used to be this way. What is happening, and why are the news reporters so condescending to Trump when they know full well he is destroying everything that matters?

    ReplyDelete
  44. The illegal transportation of refugees from Central and South American countries has now become a rather heated issue.

    ReplyDelete
  45. SDB - NPR would never stoop to advertising. They have underwriters. That’s klassier!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, and now they inform us how to become an underwriter all day long, in between begging us to donate our cars and boats, and become Evergreen memabers. It seems to me that the more money they rake in, the worse the programming becomes.

      If the BBC can do it without ads, why can't we do it here in the Colonies?

      Delete
    2. Brits are required to buy an annual license (£147 - about $200 - for a colour and £49.50 for a black and white TV), and that money funds both television and radio.

      Delete
    3. GOING, GOING GONE

      "AC" referred to Auction Chant.

      The many baseball hi(n)ts were outta the park, folks.

      Delete
    4. Do Brits need to pay a licensing fee if they only stream video over the Internet?

      Delete
    5. Have others had the experience of starting to post, changing your mind, then the later post goes back to the original spot? Even with refreshing?

      Delete
    6. I did not know Brits had TVs. I thought they had tellys.

      I like that system. It eliminated govt. getting involved and complaining about content and there are no commercials.

      Delete
    7. Jan, yes, apparently streaming requires a license. But I didn't wade through their weeds.

      WW: yes, I've seen an unintended post reappear on my computer, sometimes even after I exit the website and go back on. I think it has to do with your computer/ ISP keeping the info in the buffer, not the actual website. But I have no idea what that geek talk actually means.

      SDB: in theory it's a better system, but "The BBC is established under a Royal Charter and operates under its Agreement with the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport". So the government has control over the existence, and the total funding (they set the licensing fees) for the BBC. What could possibly go wrong when, say, a news outlet says something uncomplimentary about Our Fear Leader?

      Years ago somebody proposed that the government provide $250 per citizen (or person) for public television, but people would vote on how that money is distributed - e.g. you say you want 25% to A, 15% to B, etc. I'd give 99% to Faux!!!!

      Delete
    8. eco,
      I agree with you that the only way for it to be really a fair system would be if you and I were to run it.

      Delete
    9. Except for the you part, I agree.

      Delete
    10. Yeah, that could be an issue. I was thinking something similar.

      Delete
    11. Yeah, eco, it's odd that it holds onto just the previous place, not any text. . .

      As to NPR running the selection process, the current system just seems randumb.

      Delete
  46. Phrase: Going, going, gone.

    Songs titled, “Going, Going, Gone,” include a rock version by Bob Dylan, a country version by Lee Greenwood, and a rap version by Knockout Kid.

    ReplyDelete
  47. GOING, GOING, GONE

    > Good work, Rob! You hit it out of there!

    As in a home run.

    > No Trump. (Not a political statement, this time.)

    Something you might hear at another kind of auction.

    ReplyDelete
  48. It would be nice to know when the winner submitted their answer this week.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No one here has spoken up as getting the call this week. We may never know.

      I will send in my answers from now on as soon as I get them, usually on Sunday. I will do this for one year, after which I think I might be eligible for being called again. Then, unless we have heard that the "randomization" has changed, I will send in my answer at 2:30 pm on Thursday.

      Delete
    2. Maybe the winner will see that there is interest on here in knowing the time and day submitted.

      Delete
    3. The one time I got the call it was an early afternoon entry on the Thursday, maybe 1:30ish. Even when I get the answer right away, this week i.e., I still held off until Thursday to send. I sent this morning this week. Would love to know if we can decipher a pattern.

      Delete
  49. Too easy to clue, I only offered the cryptic "Sounds like you want in on the action." --> a(U)ction, another source for going going gone.

    Bonus Puzzle Answers:
    1. Response by some to last week's answer: No Eugene Onegin
    2. Possible heart attack symptom: A nagging angina
    3. Bad response to a vegetable: gagging on onion
    4. Knuckle head: noogie on noggin - this was my favorite
    5. Single authentic architectural curve: one genuine ogee
    6. Major Nelson event, October 7, 1969: engaging a genie
    7. Harry Morgan character hasn't changed for 50 years: non-aging Gannon - Bill Gannon, from Dragnet 1967.
    8. Assessing certain symphony conductor: gauging a Nagano
    9. San Francisco bank founder joins dangerous group: Giannini in gang - A.P. Giannini founded Bank of America.
    10. Effect of #9 for group: gaining one goon
    11. Foolish Polynesian governess: inane Niue nanny
    12. Bad time at Japanese hotel: Nagano Inn agony
    13. Bored once more at mid-day: noon ennui again

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great bonus rip-off puzzles, eco. I especially likw "non-aging Gannon," and "Nagano Inn agony," but all are excellent.

      NegoNanga

      Delete
    2. Noon ennui again. . . (at 4:45 p.m.)

      Delete
  50. Going going gone

    Last Sunday I said, “I think Blaine is wrong.” He sort of doubted that Will hit a home run with this puzzle. But as you can see from the answer, it _was_ a home run.

    ReplyDelete
  51. The answer to what the major error in the Coen Brother's film, Hail, Caesar! is, is that the Hobie Doyle character was wearing a tuxedo in Eddy Mannix's office and was asked to give up his belt in order for Mannix to securily close the briefcase that was overfilled with cash. It is a plot device so that later, when Doyle is having dinner in a restaurant and sees someone at another table with the briefcase, he knows it is the same one due to it having the belt which he recognizes. The problem with this is that it was impossible for Hobie Doyle to have had a belt. The Coens and actors, etc. had to have been aware of this too, and did it on purpose, thinking no one would notice.

    ReplyDelete
  52. GOING, GOING, GONE!
    This puzzle's gonna be...outta here!

    ReplyDelete
  53. "Not being one to judge....." was reference to Aaron Judge - the home run derby champion. Go Yankees!

    ReplyDelete
  54. GOING, GOING, GONE!

    Sadly, just like my summer tan.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's what comes from loving clothes...

      Delete
  55. I don't know when I've seen so many home runs IN ANY ONE INNING.
    I was so cautious I even avoided anagramming auction.
    I didn't want to be accused of EGGING ANYONE ON or ANNOYING A NANNY.

    And remember, NO GONGING OINGO!

    ReplyDelete
  56. Why is the government keeping us in the dark about this eclipse?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. SKB: It may be because the government is in the dark ages.

      Delete
    2. Natasha:
      If "the government is in the dark ages," it is because we the people are in the dark ages.

      Delete
    3. True. These are dark times, too. Perfect year for the solar eclipse.

      Delete
  57. Visit this week's Puzzleria!
    It has just been uploaded.
    Just link to "Joseph Young's Puzzleria!" in Blaine's helpful PUZZLE LINKS.

    Our main feature this week is a "Mini-creative-challenge" to rename the United States of America. This challenge was inspired by a correspondence skydiveboy and I had earlier this week. We both agreed that the "United States" is not a very inspired or creative name for a country.
    And, darn it, we wanted to do something about it!

    Also on our Puzzleria! menus this week are:
    One dickens of a puzzle,
    an eco-friendly puzzle,
    a Reincemeat pie puzzle,
    a car and driver and pool and diver puzzle, and
    two Riffing/Ripping Off Shortz “only-two-consonant” puzzles.

    Join us why don't you?

    LegoWhoWishesHeWasACitizenNotOfTheUnitedStatesButOf"Usurpia!"

    ReplyDelete
  58. Not all eclipse sights are up.

    https://petapixel.com/2012/05/21/crescent-shaped-projections-through-tree-leaves-during-the-solar-eclipse/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hugh - Those are intetesting videos. Seems like about ten years ago there was a partial eclipse and there were all kinds of things that gave that effect. It was pretty neat.
      I just want to be extra careful and not look at the sun to prevent a worse case scenario.
      I saw somewhere on the internet that you can even hold up a colander and get that same effect.
      I'm trying to make an indirect viewing setup with white cardboard and a magnifier to get a bigger image.

      Delete
    2. Years ago I used a colander for a partial eclipse; it worked okay, but not nearly as nice as those trees.

      Thousands of libraries are giving away solar glasses, you can see a map here.

      Delete
    3. 68charger:
      That colander method has holes in it. It was just revealed in another government leak.

      Delete
    4. eco:
      Thanks for the "see map here" link. It reminds me of Ferdinand Magellan who was one of the first to map a sea.

      Delete
    5. The colander did tell the kettle "I am holier than Thou!"

      Delete
    6. Right, but remember, it is better to sieve than to reheat.

      Delete
    7. So, ECO & SDB, I guess it didn't work "so grate"?!

      Delete
    8. Colander heads may still prevail.

      Delete