Sunday, September 10, 2017

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Sep 10, 2017): Go Nab a Cab

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Sep 10, 2017): Go Nab a Cab:
Q: Think of a famous quotation with 8 words. The initial letters of the first 4 words themselves spell a word, and the initial letters of the last 4 words spell another word. Both words rhyme with "jab." What quotation is it?"
As Yoda would say, "Do or Do Not, There is No Try."

Edit: It's a famous 8-word quote, albeit not the answer. Yoda usually urges against aggression saying things like, "A Jedi uses the Force for knowledge and defense, never for attack."
A: "Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee" - Muhammad Ali

217 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. Replies
    1. Butterflies and bees both fly, thus in flight

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  3. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  4. Hi Blaine's fans. It's me, upside down clock Al. I am so thrilled to have my puzzle presented as the challenge this week.

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    1. I dare say after mine last week, this could be the greatest Sunday Puzzle ever.

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  5. Jan - I was surprised how quickly the answer came to me until1 I read your earlier comment about the subliminal hint, I agree - very cleverly worded puzzle,

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  6. No collusion with Russia. Fake news!

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    1. Cassius Marcellus Clay /ˈkæʃəs ˌmɑːrˈsɛləs/ (October 19, 1810 – July 22, 1903), nicknamed the "Lion of White Hall", was a Kentucky planter, politician, and emancipationist who worked for the abolition of slavery. He freed the slaves that were handed down as his inheritance from his father. Those freed slaves were allowed to stay and were paid a wage. He was appointed by President Abraham Lincoln as the United States minister to Russia during the American Civil War, and is credited with gaining Russian support for the Union. [Wikipedia]

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  7. "Some lies are bad (slab), simple truths are best (stab)" ANON.

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  8. Replies
    1. In fact, don't think too much at all; it could be dangerous.

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  9. Uber zeke be sayin' "Call me a taxi, call me a cab, don't gimme no lip, it's jest my jab."

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  10. Al, universal praise from this group is no hollow feat.

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  11. A bell finally went off and there it was.

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  12. Now after you have solved this well crafted puzzle you might want to click on the Puzzleria! link Blaine has provided above and see if you can solve the puzzle I came up with that Will did not use, but Lego is using this week on his excellent puzzle blog. I think it should be easy to solve, but so far only Paul seems to have solved it, and we're not even sure about that.

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    1. Not me. They say no one ever fully appreciates a situation until about 15 minutes before it's too late.

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  13. Replies
    1. Many performers have referenced the speaker, who spent decades in the public arena, including The Sugarhill Gang, Tori Amos, Billy Joel, and Will Smith (remember when he was a rapper?).

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  14. Without compromising the rules here, I'll just say this puzzle reminded me a little of my recent vacation on Martha's Vineyard.

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    1. Jan - Does this hint have anything to do with a type of animal migration?

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    2. Ah, okay. I won't reveal now why I asked the question - but on Thursday I will.

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  15. Some libraries are beautiful! Come read a book!

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  16. Some ladies are beauties, some children are beasts.

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  17. After weeks of easy, this one is hard. My own thinking did not suffice, but searching online is not helping either. I am wondering if I've ever heard this quotation.

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    1. You've almost certainly heard it, within the past couple of years.

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    2. CL, this one is harder, though the quote has been around for a little while. It bugged me that my online search for a good list on 8 word phrases fell flat. Words like "jab" are a good place to start.

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    3. Yeah, I feel like I've exhausted the "inside out" approach to solving for now. I'm assuming it is popular enough that I will know if I have found the intended words. I'm going to finish watching Game of Thrones and I will rethink it all tomorrow. Thanks!

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  18. Those of us who lived through this have an advantage. Rabbit, Acorn, Gorilla.

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  19. I heard the puzzle while driving to Baskett Slough. Had I been paying attention to the some of the signage, I may have gotten it sooner but alas I was stuck. Usually when I get stuck, I keep trying to knock it out but I just get tired and frustrated. This case I got it with a much more low key approach at the end of day.

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  20. Got right away, but still tricky at best.

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  21. Yule get jellyrolls, just like the lasher of Dasher
    By eschewing your oat bran and chewing that rasher!

    Very enjoyable puzzle, Al, in particular the pokey part.

    LegoWhoWasARelativeSloPokeInSolvingAl'sFinePuzzle

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  22. SDB, it's got knicks on it. I call it my dingbat.

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  23. Musical clue: Melanie sang, "Look what they've done to my brain, MA."

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    1. This is an excellently crafted clue. You can quote me on that!

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  24. A very nice puzzle indeed.
    As has happened often, I figured out a good approach to finding the solution but failed to do do during the day.
    Upon awakening sometime after midnight, I started thinking about the 7 words that clued the initial letters and somehow I got the quote.
    I do think the hints kind of spoil this elegant offering.

    Unless there was conversation left out of the broadcast and transcript, I think Will was rude and rather unwelcoming to Mr. Reisman, obviously as devoted and long time a listener and participant as could be.

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    1. As someone who hasn't figured it out yet, the "hints" you mentioned haven't spoiled anything.

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    2. You could try chaos theory, clotheslover.

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    3. Yes, "initially" speaking I must be missing something. I've tried all the "rhymes with jab" words I can think of. I will keep at it. I will ask, but won't hold my breath that someone will answer; is this quote from an Anonymous source? Or is it attributed to someone specific?

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    4. Great question. Not only is the source not anonymous, but knowing the name would pretty much give away the answer immediately.

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    5. But, jan, you have to admit that Anonymous was perhaps the most prolific quote master since Confucius. Too bad he lived in obscurity. And he didn't even Tweet!

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    7. That may be too searchable.

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    8. You guys are rough if you think a place gives the answer away. I got it off of your clues easily. Punches thrown!

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    9. I googled "famous quotation" and the place name, and the first page of hits included the speaker.

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    11. Garry - still too obvious, especially in light of your earlier comment, please delete.

      By the way, I agree with you that there are a lot of hints by others that are giving too much information.

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    12. Thank you, now I deleted. There is a group here that think they are above the obvious hints. I live in Kentucky, go Big Blue!

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    13. Also, much respect for those who lost their lives on this date 16 years ago. God Bless America!

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    14. It isn't that we are above obvious hints, but the original intent of our BlogMeister is "don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline ... You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away."

      We haven't seen the wrath of Hurricane Blaine yet, but ....

      And yes, solemn remembrances for those who suffered from this horrible day in history.

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    15. I understand intent, and I respectfully disagree with your assestment of my hint. All good here. Enjoy the week, and stay safe.

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  25. I had a real problem with this puzzle until while working in my flower garden I saw the answer in front of my face by the knockout rose bushes.

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  26. What a trial! I have been fumbling around with this one for over a day, and finally got it. I add my admiration for the cleverness of the puzzle.

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  27. Ok, kuddos to Al! This puzzle really kept me on my toes. Sitting here in class, looking over all my notes and doodles, the answer finally came to me. I can't believe I didn't put it together sooner. I was making it out to be much more complex. There is beauty in simplicity. But don't quote me on that.

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  28. I had the opportunity to meet this person and hear this quote in person. quite a class act all the way around. I am sure that the person would appreciate the subtly of the puzzle. Way to go, Al.
    An Old Myope

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  29. Doesn't Ring A Bell. Same Thing As Before.

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  30. Natasha - Just curious how your friends & relatives are doing after the big storm?

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    1. I know it may be too early to hear anything.

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    2. Hi 68Charger! Thank you for asking. I heard from all but one friend. They are fine. However, Orlando people said it was scary and will not stay in home next time. No damages to any homes but trees affected. I was so nervous this weekend for everyone. Glad it is over.

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    3. Good deal! I wasn't sure how to reply the other day when you said what cities they were in. They they seemed awful close to the high impact areas.
      Glad they are doing OK!

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    4. Thanks. I still have some to hear from.

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  31. Thanks all. I was struggling but by the 59th post of 68 I caught on and got it. Robin Quivers would love this puzzle too!

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  32. I want to remind you clever puzzle solvers that Lego is running a puzzle I made up over at his Puzzleria! blog. The deadline is noon Wednesday and so far only Paul has indicated he has solved it. It is very straightforward, no tricks, I am hoping others will solve it too and find it satisfying. Will turned it down I guess, as he had it for awhile before I gave it to Lego to use, so I would also be interested in your feedback as to whether it is a worthy puzzle or not.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. In the cornucopia of puzzles in Legoville I can figure out witch is witch (go to 3:15); can you repeat your puzzle here?

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    3. I should have said "I can never figure out"

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    4. eco,
      I know what you mean. It is the first puzzle in the bunch. It is the Appetizer and is about signs found on highways in this country. Good luck, you should find it very easy.

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    5. I found it less a word puzzle, and more a trivia puzzle. Unless the answer is "state".

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    6. I agree with you, and assume you may have even solved it already, but that would not surprise me.

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    7. No! Your comment is fine. And the answer is not a state, but you already knew that, right?

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    8. I meant was the answer "State", as in State Highway 1". For that matter, the answer could be US, as in "US Highway 1".

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    9. No, it is the proper name of a geographical location. There is no trick, but you might find it a bit clever. I hope anyway. :)

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  33. Why do you think they call it dope?

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    1. I don't know, but have always thought it may refer to those who use it as being stupid, but that always seemed too obvious. Or perhaps it makes people under the influence to appear dopey.

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    2. Or happy, or sleepy or bashful.

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    3. I do know what you mean, BTW. Diversion.

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  34. I could imagine a lot of younger people never having heard this before.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  35. I got sdb's puzzle -- a superb one, and more than worthy for Will. Someday I'll tell you a funny story about those signs. D.E.

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    1. DE - Thank you, I very much appreciate that. I am about to submit another one to also be rejected I guess. I just got back home from a hard day of hiking and am sore and tired and your comment makes my day.

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    2. DE - Please tell us your story tomorrow (Wednesday) after the deadline at noon PDLST on Puzzleria!. If you are a new poster, Lego will be thrilled. Oh, and don't forget to post your answer(s) there too.

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    3. I never did get the answer, and I HATE YOU BOTH!(DE, don't worry, inside joke).

      So, what's the answer?

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    4. I just posted the answer over @ Puzzleria!

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    5. It was a cute puzzle, but I respectfully disagree with your answer. According to this site there were 7000 Burma Shave signs max.

      There had to be many more signs that said US, as in US Route 1. You can read all about the history of the shield sign here if you're bored. They have these signs every so often, and at intersections and turns, and with numerous cross country highways running both directions (50, 66 most famous east to west) I've driven quite a length on Hwy 50, and got to believe they went way over 7000.

      I'm just being fussy. If you had worded the puzzle "what's the geographic location NOT in the United States..." I'd believe the answer.

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    6. I guess "Burma Shave" must be sdb's answer, but I have never learned how to navigate Rearrangeria, either to submit an answer or find the official one after the deadline.
      I saw hundreds of real Burma Shave sequenced ads as a kid.
      My sister and I would read the ones on the other side in reverse order and then reconstruct them.
      Toward the end they became more and more risque and made awkward moments for families with younger children.
      My answer was U.S.

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    7. I can also be fussy. U.S. is not a country, nor is United States a country. There are other united states, such as Mexico and Brazil, and they are also American. We have never named our country, we only have a description.

      I originally thought of phrasing it something like: What country is found on signs....., but it would be indicating both Canada and Mexico, and what would be left but Burma? Sorry you didn't solve it.

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    8. Were there 7000 signs with "Burma" on them, or only about one sixth that many?

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    9. Let's see if I can outfuss: you asked for a geographical location, which in itself is a relatively ambiguous term.

      I know arguing whether US is a country or not is one of your pet projects. But most recognize the short hand United States (of America). But is it a geographic location? Most of the world would say yes to both.

      Just as most would say Mexico is a country, when in fact it is Estados Unidos Mexicanos. Or Burma, which is Union of Burma, though now Myanmar.

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    10. The fact that so many around the world condescend to our national hegemony does not impress me; it disgusts me. We insist we alone are American. Explain how that can be. I do not agree that U.S. is a geographical location, although I agree many others do. I also know many citizens of other American countries, such as Peru for example, are very upset that they too are not respected as being just as American as we here are.

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    11. I agree with eco. If you are submitting the puzzle to Will, "U.S." will be seen as the most common geographic sign, which makes Burma a distant second.

      It would be fun to come up with a puzzle for Me 'N' Mar(k), though.

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    12. This discussion reminds me of how Roman Catholics believe theirs is the only church. When someone says he was in church, it would have to be one of theirs in order for it to be true in their mind. The same can be said of Mormons. What would you call a citizen of the Union of South Africa, which in 2010 changed it to Republic of South Africa? Are they Republicans? or Africans? Also, notice they at first were also U.S.A. It really helps to name your country. Interesting too that both our country and the one in S. Africa are named by English speaking Caucasians.

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    13. I like the concept of the puzzle, just the wording makes it ambiguous, and that may have been a stopper for WS. My hindsight (but not the sight of my hind) is better than my foresight, but if you had said:

      Many years ago the name of a certain foreign country appeared on (highway) signs all across this country. What was the foreign country, and what were the signs?

      Note that Blaine alluded to this in this blog on August 24, 2014.

      Delete
    14. eco,
      You had better hope I don't perfect my nuculur long range mistle system.

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    15. In response, i'll miss with my miss i'll.

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    16. Dowager Empress:

      I wanted to be sure you saw my reply post to yours over at Puzzleria! today. I also shared a story you might enjoy.

      Happy you liked the puzzle.

      Delete
  36. Got it while my students were taking a test today. Just came to me. Actually, it was already there, just waiting.

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  37. I also think Will should have given the caller more love on air given his history with the puzzle.

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  38. Actually the clue in the puzzle gave it to me in minutes. There just aren’t that many 4 letter words that rhyme with jab.

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  39. One of the current clues here led me almost directly to the answer through Google. I'd be crazier than a road lizard if I told you which clue...

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  40. Are they now going to rename the Virgin Islands after they were f*cked by Irma?

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    1. I think it means your comment about the Virgin Islands was unnecessary and surprisingly feeble minded coming from you; someone who has displayed great intelligence previously.

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    2. You may not know SDB cannot resist the temptation to make a pun, no matter the consequences.

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    3. I make no apologies for what I consider to have been, and still is, a clever and humorous joke. Humor, like gold, is where and when you find it. Bad and terrible things happen every day all over the world and the idea that people don't use humor as a relief is nonsense, as is the idea we must wait until some nebulous alarm bell goes off signalling now we may make a joke about a sensitive subject. Or we can choose to be sheep and allow ignorance to dictate how we must act.

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    4. Ah, I just remembered the well known joke about the Lincoln assassination: "Aside from that, Mrs. Lincoln, how was the play?"

      Now as much as I love that one, I certainly, under no circumstances, would consider it permissible to tell at his funeral. Even I would agree they should wait until at least the reception that followed.

      There will always be those who are offended by humor that addresses the darker side of life, and some will even be outraged, but it will go on regardless, and I say, more power to those who will follow their own instincts and not those of the self appointed political correctness police who feel it is their right to control those of us who have creative minds.

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    5. skydiveboy: Sometimes you come across as if arrogance is a virtue.

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    6. clotheslover:

      Merrian-Webster:
      Definition of arrogance
      :an attitude of superiority manifested in an overbearing manner or in presumptuous claims or assumptions

      Doesn't that describe you in this regard? It's a joke; get over it.

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    7. Don't stress, I was over it last Tuesday. Interesting how when you state your opinion it’s free speech, but if I state mine it’s "overbearing" and/or "presumptuous". Right…

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    8. Clotheslover,

      People are not all the same, and we think differently about things. Some things are almost universally accepted, but not by all. Those few who have a different understanding are sometimes reviled for their ideas. The perfect example for this is the concept of reincarnation in the Western Hemisphere. There is quite a bit of strong evidence for, but none against, yet some people who are on the against side get very upset with hearing it expressed as being true. They can sometimes be very arrogant and insulting without presenting any reason other than their belief in the matter, which they insist has to be true, since that is what they have heard all their life.

      Peter Ustinov must have had this problem with humor because of his quote: "Comedy is just a funny way of being serious."

      After I read your post that indicated you might just be having some trouble seeing the humor in my joke I decided to take a Google look-see, expecting I would find I was not even the first to come up with something similar. I found that someone came up with one like mine, but it was days before the hurricane landed, it was prophetic. I also saw other jokes from survivors in Florida, some of which were in video form, and very funny.

      Long ago when I still had cable TV and occasionally watched Larry King Live, I watched it one evening when he had two guests, the first being a trans woman who was running for political office. During the interview the guest who was to follow her telephoned the show, interrupting the guest and telling her to hurry up and get off so he could come on. That arrogant jerk was none other than Garry Shandling. When it was his turn he was interrupted by a telephone call too. This time it was the previous guest he had disrupted. While she handled it with calm and grace, Shandling threw a major fit. That is what I call unacceptable arrogance.

      When I make up a joke my hope is for it to help people to laugh. I think laughter is good as long as it is not at the expense of people who do not deserve to be ridiculed or put down for no good reason.

      Delete

    9. skydiveboy: I accept that and agree.

      Upon reading your comment about Irma, my feeling was: "Ick". Not because of the comment, but because it came from you. The off-putting joke was more disappointing than anything, because I have begun to expect better from you. From the moment I posted my first comment on this blog, (which seemed to horrify you, because I unknowingly broke the rules and you called me Harriet(?) if I remember correctly) I have admired your great ability to write excellent, read-worthy comments(sometimes arrogant) and intelligent contributions(many) to this "blog-versation". I have also grown to appreciate your adherence to the rules of this blog, and your strict enforcement of them (although intimidating at times). I certainly don't always agree with what you say, know exactly what you are talking about, or take an interest in commenting on your posts, although I do read them. Now, I don't know you from Adam, but I was always taught to respect my Elders, and it's no different in this situation. Overtime, your presence here on this blog seems to demand a tone of respect, but you've earned it. Your comment made me think: "Ick, what a dirty old man." It was just a let down, and not your best work. If I didn't admire you so, it wouldn't have bothered me.

      Delete
    10. Clotheslover:

      I am just going to pass over all your thoughtful post, which I could make numerous comments on, and instead focus on your last sentence. And perhaps that is the crux of the issue with you anyway.

      As you grow older you will most likely discover more and more, and much to your horror, that those who you admire greatly, will almost certainly let you down eventually when you discover something, perhaps something hidden, but not always, that shows them to be imperfect and perhaps even worse.

      I have been experiencing this lately here in Seattle, where just yesterday our mayor, who I have known since he entered politics almost 25 years ago, resigned over adolescent sexual abuse accusations that go back to the 1970s. The latest was from his distant cousin who came forward day before yesterday. This is not the Ed Murray I and others who know him have known over the years. Ed has been an outstanding politician of impeccable comportment and accomplishments, but now this has shocked us all to the core. It is not about hypocrisy either, as is the case with so many Republican politicians who are gay and dump on their own, but he has been a hero in the gay community for the outstanding work he has done while a state representative and then state senator, and even head of the senate.

      I am left with the realization that we all have flaws, and some have outrageous skeletons in their closets, but then I have to remind myself that we are here on this planet in order to learn and grow. So I am now left with the understanding that not only is Ed suffering and losing, but we all are, because he was so effective as a leader, but even though he may have evolved beyond that period in his life, society deems it unforgivable.

      Delete
  41. I assume many here also subscribe to the Google group for the Sunday Puzzle, an outgrowth of the old Topica group.
    Richard Renner has a link there this week to an even earlier Shortz related post from 1995, describing his experience as the on-the-air guest.
    Since the puzzle in question (the one Steven Reisman brought up) was more than just a little embarrassing for the PM, it may help explain his apparent attitude toward the old fan.
    It also sheds light on the ongoing darkness around randomness.
    I have read this post a few times in the past and still enjoy the heck out of it.
    Links are hard to post so copying and pasting might be necessary.

    http://www.taterenner.com/NPRMYEX7.php

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    1. Interesting link. Thanks, Mendo Jim.

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    2. I enjoyed that post so much, Mendo Jim. Thank you for the link.

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    3. Wow, that article was really REALLY entertaining! So amusing and well-written. It was fun, also to compare how differently the NPR call was done back then....i.e. now there is no engineer putting you on hold, or not allowing you to hear next week's possible, potentially. I am glad they were persistent, however, in trying to reach him down in FL, and didn't just give up after he wasn't there yet.

      The part about the lapel pin being made in Asia...well, that DOES tarnish the thing somewhat (I have two by now.) I can really feel for him that he was not able to make his point either re that or re his fledgling civil rights law practice. I hope it thrived after that!

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    4. Ekes, the word 'possible' was supposed to be 'puzzle.'

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  42. As has happened before, I have yet another Thursday doctor’s appointment, this one for 1:45 PM CDT. I’m sure I won’t be back home to post at 2:00. Catch up with you later.

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    1. "FLOAT LIKE A BUTTERFLY, STING LIKE A BEE"

      "Degree" = A.B., from the Latin for artium baccalaureus is a bachelor's degree and is also A BEE.

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  43. Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee.

    My Hints:

    “A bell finally went off and there it was.” As in the boxing ring the bell signaled the end of the round.

    “Musical clue: Abbey Road” A bee road.

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  44. FLOAT LIKE A BUTTERFLY, STING LIKE A BEE

    > No need to think outside the box this week.

    Boxing's what it's all a bout.

    > In fact, don't think too much at all; it could be dangerous.

    "Yon Cassius has a lean and hungry look; He thinks too much: such men are dangerous." -- Shakespeare, Julius

    Caesar
    .

    > Without compromising the rules here, I'll just say this puzzle reminded me a little of my recent vacation on Martha's Vineyard.

    Henry Clay was known as "The Great Compromiser". The Gay Head Cliffs consist almost entirely of clay. And,

    at the time that he first spoke the quote, Muhammad Ali was Cassius Clay.

    > Musical clue: Melanie sang, "Look what they've done to my brain, MA."

    Muhammad Ali suffered from traumatic brain injury.

    > You could try chaos theory, clotheslover.

    The butterfly effect describes how a small change in one state of a deterministic nonlinear system can result in

    large differences in a later state, e.g. a butterfly flapping its wings in Brazil can cause a tornado in Texas.


    I couldn't think of a way to point to Wikipedia's Picture of the Day today without giving it away.

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    1. So Jan, your image of Gay Head MV reminded that 20 to 25 yrs ago - I can't remember when - but Bill and Hillary were there then too. There was a monarch butterfly floating over the beach at Gay Head every 2 or three minutes. That was what I thought your clue was about. so - Why the image of Gay Head cliff?

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    2. As I noted above, the cliffs are made mostly of clay. When I looked up "clay" on Wikipedia, I found that picture.

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  45. I wrote, "What a trial! I have been fumbling around with this one for over a day." The hints were "triALI;" "bee[n]," and "fumbling" because I thought "bumbling" (as in bumble bee) would be too obvious.

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  46. I wrote:

    "universal praise from this group is no hollow feat." The Latin origin of the name Cassius means hollow. Feat is a play on feet of clay. Ali was still called Cassius Clay when he first said this in 1964.

    In response to SDB's "bell" I linked to Anita Ward's disco smash "Ring my Bell", to link to the boxing ring.

    "It bugged (butterfly and bee) me that my online search for a good list on (Sonny Liston, Clay/ Ali beat him for his first title) 8 word phrases fell flat (in their second bout Liston fell flat on his back from the famous phantom punch).

    Garry Rust, no offense intended, but Muhammad Ali appears at or near the top of most searches for people from Louisville. I thought that made it a giveaway.

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    1. None taken, but "jab", slugger, in reference to Louisville Slugger were obvious hints too. Water under the bridge to Indiana at this point. Really though, how many people who post don't have the answer already?

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  47. Float Like A Butterfly, Sting Like A Bee.
    -Muhammad Ali

    Flab and slab rhyme with jab. Thanks for the support in solving this one fellow puzzlers, I needed it this week!

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  48. I talked about my flower garden where I saw butterflies and bees hanging out around the knockout, boxing term, rose bushes.

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  49. Float like a butterfly (flab), sting like a bee (slab).

    Last Sunday I said, “Al – a truly great puzzle.” “Al,” not only for the puzzle’s creator but also short for Ali, formerly Cassius Clay, to whom the quotation is attributed. “Great” as in the quotation from Muhammad Ali – “I am the greatest.”

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  50. Float like a butterfly (flab), sting like a bee (slab).” Muhammad Ali.

    4-letter words that rhyme with “jab” →
    Arab
    blab
    crab
    drab
    flab
    grab
    scab
    slab
    stab
    swab (does not rhyme with “jab”)

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  51. I hid ALI in my post. Also "thrilled" that hinted at The Thriller in Manila.

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  52. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    1. FLOAT LIKE A BUTTERFLY, STING LIKE A BEE.-Muhammed Ali
      The rhyming words are FLAB and SLAB.
      I did say this was "The Greatest" puzzle, didn't I?

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  53. I said "greatest ever". Had I said " of all time", that might have given it away.

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  54. Googling the phrase crazier than a road lizard from my hint returns many things about Owen Wilson, who, as Lightening McQueen, said float like a Cadillac, sting like a Beemer.

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  55. By the way, Leo's clue about Rabbit, Acorn, Gorilla led me directly to Ali by Googling those three words together.

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    1. Wow. That surprises me. I thought it was pretty obscure.

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    2. I hadn't tried that before, but yeah, Googling just those three words produces 3 Muhammad Ali links on the first page of hits. And one for "Adam & Eve® Rabbit Vibrators - The #1 Source for Adult Toys‎".

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    3. jan - Did you happen to get what the price is on those Rabbit Vibrators? And does it include postage?

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    4. Nah. I thought they only made expensive corkscrews. You sure don't want to reach for the wrong device in the heat of the moment.

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    5. That's for sure! Do you see much of that in your practice?

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    6. No. Usually, only the last inch or so is visible.

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    7. I guess we could go round and round with this one.

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    8. SDB: this may knock you down a few more notches in Clotheslover's respect chart, Jan, you may be joining that downward spiral.

      Meanwhile, to tie into recent events, did you know the origin of the name "Steely Dan"?

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    9. This whole thread is rapidly losing steam. . .

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    10. In that case I suppose jan and I will go down together. Oooops! Did I just commit another faux pas?

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    11. Eco, is "downward spiral" another corkscrew reference? If so, welcome to the downward spiral!

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    12. As you well know I loathe puns, and any inferences that may arise are overblown.

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    13. We do know that! Should you ever decide to try making one, I'm sure jan, WW and I will be happy to help you.

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    14. Indeed.

      Weren't you going on about loathes and fishes just recently, eco?

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    15. WW: the back of this critter looks a bit like a loath of bread, and the front is, I guess, a fish. Happy nightmares!

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    16. I'm more concerned with whether or not I would need a litter box.

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    17. My guess is you would need a litter box. I'm not sure whether the sea critter would need one.

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    18. Cheap shot, but you stepped right into it.

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    19. It is beneath my dignity to stoop so low.


      (Actually I realized I left myself open for that reply, and wondered why you took so long.) I would have done the same.

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    20. eco, what an odd creature. I sea what you mean. . .

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    21. SDB: I took so long because I am usually multi tasking in the evening, somewhat non-directional, you might even say my attention is ____ ____ (2 appropriate synonyms that form a 1 word appropriate homophone).

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  56. FLOAT LIKE A BUTTERFLY, STING LIKE A BEE.

    Last week, after Jan commented on the hint (jab) being built into the puzzle statement, I replied, "I'll drink to that." The drink I had in mind was PUNCH,,,a term which also played a part in last week's on air game..

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  57. My hint:
    Yule get jellyrolls, just like the lasher of Dasher
    By eschewing your oat bran and chewing that rasher!

    Or, in other words:
    If you eat a SLAB of bacon instead of oat bran for breakfast, you'll develop rolls of FLAB like the lasher of Dasher, whose round belly shook like a bowlful of jelly.

    This week's Puzzleria! is uploaded. (It is anagram-free this week, MJ.)

    OgleMadlab

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  58. Mendo Jim, I found this Will Shortz salary from 2005 for The New York Times. It's a start. . .

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    1. Excellent sleuthing, WW, though it doesn't say how much NPR pays, if anything.

      You can see guess who? here.

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    2. That seems like a lot of money to pay a guy who is always working at cross-purposes.

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  59. Thanks WW, I found that when doing my "research."
    I thought it strange that a private company would make his salary public, when a public one would go out of its way to keep it private.
    Listener supported radio, taxes and contributions both, phooey.

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  60. Replies
    1. It's amazing how many movies and TV shows he had been in over the last 60+ years!

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  61. Why does the government allow Parker Brothers to have a Monopoly?

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    1. We knew that, SuperZee, but excellent reply none the less. :-)

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    2. I thought it worth the Risk.

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    3. Well you took a Chance and gave it a Go.

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  62. We are now at the 200 post point and you will need to drop down to the end and click Load More to see and/or post.

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