Sunday, October 15, 2017

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Oct 15, 2017): Two Week Challenge: Move Two Numbers

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Oct 15, 2017): Two Week Challenge: Move Two Numbers:
Q: This is a two-week challenge. Write down the equation:
65 – 43 = 21.
You'll notice that this is not correct. 65 minus 43 equals 22, not 21. The object is to move exactly two of the digits to create a correct equation. There is no trick in the puzzle's wording. In the answer, the minus and equal signs do not move.
I used to be an advocate of more challenging number/math puzzles. But this one is not worthy of a two-week challenge.

144 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

    Remember, this is a two week challenge, so the deadline is Thursday, Oct 26 at 3pm ET.

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    1. I have it. What link do I hit

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    2. Here you go: NPR Sunday Puzzle .

      It's also linked above in the second heading.

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  2. It's a bit of a shifty puzzle for a two week challenge.

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  3. I had written a hint that is almost exactly the one Blaine has given, honest; and Blaine's is a super, solid gold hint (so was mine).

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    1. We can work together rather against each other. :)

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    2. Blaine's clue was useful after I solved the puzzle to verify. Great clue!

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  4. You would think a two week puzzle would have been harder.

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  5. Stupid musical clues: Public Enemy, and Huey Lewis and the News.

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  6. There are 8 or 9 puzzles just like this one.

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  7. Super easy this week. Just stick to the script and you'll get it.

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  8. Very easy. I solved it without a calculator while still in bed. Now it's time for another.

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  10. I am going to defend WS this week (sorry Mendo Jim) and agree with him that it is a "too weak challenge."

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    1. Ouch! (But great wordplay none the less.)

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  11. I'm trusting Mendo Jim is okay, I hope he gets his power back soon. The Redwood Fire in Mendocino County is mostly burning in a fairly remote area.

    For me, my second and third houses in the area are under threat this morning, but it doesn't look like the fires will raze them.

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  12. This one is especially for SDB who appreciates geography puzzles. In which U.S. State is NORTH 100 miles southeast of DUE WEST?

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    1. ron, I don't think I understand your puzzle. North is not a location. North of what? Due West of what? Does this have something to do with the Prime Meridian and the Aleutian Islands?

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    2. Good puzzle Ron.

      SDB: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mn60YWO218k#t=110s

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    3. SDB: it's in the palm of your hand.

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    4. Buck Bard: that is definitely NOT what I meant.

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    5. Phew! Though, I would have written ewww. . .

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    6. Would I want you to flag my posting?

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    7. When I say it I emphasize the vowel sound.

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  13. Thanks again for all your expressions of concern for my situation vis-a-vis the nearby fire and for my ability to assess the risk involved.
    The fire is indeed in a "fairly remote" area, but then so am I.
    Since there is not much to say about this week's puzzle, I will tell you that I have been increasingly displeased by my telephone service from AT&T and have been about to drop it for my also increasingly satisfactory cell phone provider (US Cellular).
    Well the cell phone (and electricity) went blooey for four days while Ma Bell's land line kept me in the world. Until a hour or so ago when a flat bed truck carrying a too-tall mechanical wine-grape harvester down my lane ripped it from its pole.
    AT&T's robot, after making me push about 47 numbers on my cell phone, assured me they will fix it between 9 and 5 on October 23.

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    1. I’ve considered moving up north of the Bay Area for a while. One of my concerns is fast internet. I couldn’t live with dial up. What do you do for internet?

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    2. My clients in remote Mendo County (off grid house, well water, etc) were using Hughes net satellite service, though the dish probably got overcooked. 10 years ago or so it was pretty crappy, I remember when I was house sitting it couldn't handle a Skype voice only call. But it's gotten better.

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    3. It seems both sad and a bit ridiculous to try to deliver mail in that part of Santa Rosa now. The music in the drone clip was spot on.

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    4. People here have noted the irony, but the post office is required to deliver unless folks happened to go and put a hold or forward on delivery. Most of my mail is junk, I wouldn't miss it, but people get social security checks, etc.

      But isn't it nice to wake up on a Monday morning and not hear about people under fire in the west?

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    5. So true, eco. Good Monday morning news for a change!

      I am wondering how the USPS can deliver mail if most of the mail boxes are just gone?

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    6. I think social security phased out checks a few years ago....

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    7. BB: You're probably right, I'm not there yet.

      WW: No doubt the PO has written procedures, Part 12, Section 72, Rule 432 Subsection 6.

      Actually I was joking, but then I saw this. Happy reading.

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  14. I assume the second answer I found is not valid, as it relies on a leading zero which does not appear in the (written) statement of the puzzle.

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  15. A variant of the intended answer involves moving one of the digits out of the equation altogether.

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  18. This isn’t a hint, it’s just interesting. I worked on this for a while Sunday morning and didn’t get it. Went to bed Sunday night and when I woke up this (Monday) morning, the answer was the first thing that came to mind. I guess my brain kept working while I was sleeping.

    I expect relatively few correct answers this week for no other reason than most people are better with words than they are with numbers.

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  19. I think I found a solution with google.

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    1. And where would be the satisfaction in that way?

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  20. Replies
    1. And where would be the satisfaction in that way?

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    3. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    4. He sure overpaid on hotel rates, though!

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    5. I'm guessing Trump will always stay at a Hostile.

      Short article on the legal and historical grounds for impeachment, and the author had a radio interview this morning.

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  21. I'm rather happy this is a two week challenge and easily solved. Now I have more time and incentive to work on my doctoral thesis.

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  22. Wow. SDB. Care to share the thesis topic?

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    1. The title is:

      "Why Some People Never Finish Their Doctoral Thesis"

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    2. I know some people you can interview.

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    3. Subtitled: "A Study of Number Agreement."

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    4. Skydiveboy was just testing to see if you would catch it, MJ.

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  23. Isn't that called an an ABD (All But Dissertation)?

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  24. You might want to read this Vanity Fair, 10/11/17 Trump article:

    https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2017/10/donald-trump-is-unraveling-white-house-advisers

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    1. SDB: Good article! I bet his cabinet is always glad when the day is finally over. Of course, the day is never really over when you factor in the tweets starting up.
      Regarding Trump bringing up past protocol on notifying fallen soldiers' families, when will someone important stand up and ask: "Have you no sense of decency?"

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    2. I would be surprised if anyone today was still asking that....

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    3. I don't think being called on the carpet, for not showing common decency, will ever go out of style. At least I hope not!

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    4. Totally agree, but with this individual is the question even valid to anyone not waking from a 2 year coma?

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    5. I think it is valid to ask that question to each and every Republican in Congress, 5 members of the Supreme Court, Anyone who is enabling Trump, the Vice President, the Attorney General, and many others.

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    6. Since the puzzle was so easy, and in response to 68Charger's reminder of the events in 1954 (attended by Trump's legal guardian Roy Cohn, how about a 2 week creative challenge:

      The 6 words "Have you no sense of decency" helped galvanize the nation into rebuking McCarthy and his terror campaign. Can you create a succinct phrase (let's say 10 words maximum) that can do the same for Trump?

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    7. How about this: Mr. Trump. Have you no sense?"

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    8. That's pretty much the first one that came to me, but I think everyone already knows that, so it's not going to get him out.

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    9. Perhaps something that addresses our own responsibility, as Kennedy asked as his inaugural address.

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    10. eco, what's your new thumbnail?

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    11. The photo is my little memorial, looking down towards the strawbale house that burned in the Redwood Fire last week.

      I spoke with the owners yesterday, who were finally allowed to go back on Sunday. The garage survived with only minor singes, but only one small section of one wall of the main house remained. On the right side of the photo are photovoltaic panels on a tracker, which were not damaged and were charging the batteries in the power house, also was not damaged.

      Their house was on the southern edge of the fire, so the beautiful valley below was mostly not hit.

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    12. Hopefully they rebuild your design or consult with you on a new design.

      What’re the R values on those? Seems like it would be high. What about construction costs versus traditional?

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    13. A moving tribute, eco. I am so sorry that had to bail from the straw bale home. Hoping they will recover and rebuild.

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    14. They went through the full range of emotions over the last week, as have thousands of others in the area. They have decided to rebuild, a smaller house, and only one story - husband's knees aren't what they were 20 years ago. We didn't discuss whether it would be strawbale again.

      Strawbale walls have an "official" R value of 32 in California, roughly the equivalent of a 10" thick wall with fiberglass insulation. The actual value is probably a bit higher, the testing results varied for many complicated reasons, and the state chose a conservative value.

      Strawbale construction is about 10-15% more expensive than conventional, most of that expense is from the thicker walls (which means wider foundations and more roof area), plastered interior walls rather than drywall, and some complications installing doors and windows, electric wiring, and plumbing.

      California and Colorado have the most strawbale buildings in the US, including many open for visitors. Hidden Villa in Los Altos Hills is probably the closest to Palo Alto.

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    15. I’m debating retirement building, and container construction is currently leading the pack. Looking for something mid-state, like Carmel Valley or SLO. I’m not sure insulation will make a huge difference in this climates.

      I’m curious about the plaster. I get the other stuff, but why not drywall?

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    16. Carmel Valley and SLO (San Luis Obispo for others) certainly have mild climates, so the benefits aren't as significant as, say, the Central Valley or the Sierras. But if you want to do an energy efficient house you greatly benefit from more insulation than the codes require.

      I haven't worked with container construction, my concerns are the limitations in size, especially ceiling heights, and they typically use the more toxic rigid insulation. I have done several prefabricated modular homes, mostly in the Half Moon Bay area.

      Two reasons for plaster: strawbales are imperfect blocks, with lots of bulges. You can shave them to be flatter, but will never get the tight seal with the drywall boards. This will create convective air currents in the void, which is not good for energy performance. You also need to provide additional wood to attach the drywall, defeats a lot of the environmental advantages.

      Years ago at one of our conferences a guy did a presentation about fire danger in strawbale houses, with a case study of the fire spreading quickly. We were all confused about how this could happen until he said the magic words "drywall interior walls", and we knew exactly what happened. If there is a fire in the wall it will spread quickly through the chimney effect created by the air space between bales and boards; this is avoided in standard wood construction with horizontal fire blocking. Quick aside, only the inside face of the exterior strawbale walls need to be plastered, in most houses the interior walls are standard wood with drywall, though I did a school with a strawbale interior wall to acoustically separate noisy woodworking from the quieter classroom.

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    17. I hadn’t thought of that. The noise insulation must be fantastic.

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    18. The first time I stayed in a strawbale house the quiet was almost creepy - but you quickly learn to love it. Or you open a window.

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    19. How about this: Mr. Trump, just what the hell is wrong with you? 10 words exactly.

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    20. "Don't fire until you see the white of their flags!"

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  25. I assume it is/was in Redwood Valley, just a few miles from me in Potter Valley.
    Most of the homes lost in the fire were there, three hundred or more in a small area, and probably 10 or more dead when the counting is over.
    I used to live there, but have yet to make the short trip to see it first hand.

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    1. Yes, it was above Redwood Valley. I think they are still restricting access to the burn area, but don't know that for sure. And thanks for the numbers, the Santa Rosa Press Democrat has some of the best coverage, including harrowing stories of escape, sad stories of loss, and inspiring stories of heroism and survival. And a good map that is constantly updated.

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    2. Must be a different SRPD than the one I have wasted money on for 45 years.
      There has been lots of Sonoma County pics and maps, but he Redwood/Potter Valley fire has gotten essentially no coverage in ten days.

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    3. Whoops: has to have (number agreement, you know) and he to the.

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    4. MJ, I agree the Press Democrat has been Sonoma focused, secondarily Napa, and Mendo is a distant third. I suppose Lake County is an even more distant fourth.

      Unfortunate, but they cover what they know, and the fire did race through a large city. One doesn't expect a Kmat and Applebee's to burn. Besides, rural folk "Knew What [They] Signed Up For", so deserve less sympathy, right? I heard it from the jackass' mouth.

      I see the Ukiah Daily Journal has more local coverage, but of course is a smaller paper.

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    5. KMart and Applebee’s burning was a favor....

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    6. Stop your whining, you Californians! You all know Trump is working as hard as he can to help, just like he did with Puerto Rico.

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    7. He gave himself a 10 for helping PR. Something is really not right with him. I get really scared thinking about the damage he can do. By the way, I doubt he will be asked to work for Hallmark writing sympathy cards.

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  26. Is ws on vacation this Sunday and no sp?

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    1. They said the international puzzle convention thing was this week in India; I suspect that's why this amazingly difficult challenge is 2 weeks. They'll probably have a pre-recorded on air puzzle with a celebrity during the puzzle segment. I suppose all of the segments are pre-recorded, just not with celebrities.

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    2. I thought about that convention also. There just will not be a new puzzle. They will repeat this one. Thanks.

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  28. Another Bonus Puzzle:
    Swap the first and last name of a well-known sports personality to get the title that a certain politician would like to have. Who are they?

    Ron, restrain from answering for at least a couple of days.

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    1. That was even easier than the NPR puzzle for this week, I mean fortnight.

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    2. I thought you might find it easy; but I thought it amusing. It popped into my head while I was writing an email about this article, which I found hilarious.

      I'll try to think of harder bonus puzzles, otherwise we'l be bored to tears and start reading the news.

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    3. Regarding ecoarchitect's latest excellent Bonus Puzzle:
      Keep intact the first and last names of eco's "well-known sports personality" and remove any spaces. Replace three consecutive letters of this result with two different letters to form a word.
      That word is a symbol that the "certain politian" may once have embraced, and perhaps still embraces.
      A 3-letter synonym of that word describes the "certain politian" perfectly.
      Hint: Using A=1, B=2, C=3...Z=26, the sum of the alphanumeric values of the three letters you replaced equals 30, which happens to be the identical sum of the alphanumeric values of the two letters with which you replaced them.

      Fellow Blainiacs:
      Why not fill our two-week puzzle void by sampling seven fresh puzzles that will be posted on my Puzzleria! blog, after midnight PDT tonight... and every Thursday/Friday midnight, Pacific Time?
      * Two of them are Riff-offs of Will Shortz's current NPR puzzle that I trust may be a tad more tricky.
      * Two others are pretty challenging (I think) puzzles in which I ask you to "translate" algebraic equations into English poetry.
      * One involves body parts and pure wordplay.
      * One is a relatively easy puzzle about best-selling author that, eerily, somewhat echoes eco's latest bonus puzzle.
      * One asks the solver to find a city on the world map, and its climate. (skydiveboy and other geography wonks may especially appreciate this one, I hope.)

      Seriously, I sincerely invite all of my fellow puzzle aficionados to visit us on Puzzleria! Sample our puzzles. It's like a buffet; check out what looks appetizing. Then help yourself to "all you can solve..." or "all you care to solve."

      LegoWhoCannotRewardYouWithLapelPinsButWhoDoesAspireToProvideAWeeklyPinnacleOfPuzzletry

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    4. I enjoy your puzzles far more than WS’s. Maybe we should start a write in campaign for the next NPR Puzzlemaster?

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    5. That is very kind of you to say, Buck Bard. Thank you. I do admire WS, however.
      He has a lot on his plate:
      attending and hosting puzzle conventions;
      treating his table tennis avocation as a vocation;
      editing and cranking out a NYT crossword puzzle 7 days a week, 52 weeks a year(!);
      hosting and running national crossword puzzle tournaments; and
      oh yes, conducting weekly NPR on-air and lapel-pin challenges...
      And he has been doing this stuff for decades.
      I spend almost all my waking hours working on puzzles for my blog, and it has, I realize, room for improvement.
      I am frankly in awe of people people like you, eco, sdb, Word Woman, Paul, ron, jan, Natasha, ViolinTeddy, Mendo Jim, Jim, Rob, Chuck, cranberry, SuperZee, 68Charger, clotheslover, Ralph Loizzo,...and Blaine(!) etc. etc. etc., many of whom I know have active and productive lives, actually producing goods and services and doing good works... and yet still find the time to contribute wisdom and creativity to this blog and to my Puzzleria! blog.
      I guess what I'm saying is that I really appreciate all of you... and Will Shortz as well.
      But, again Buck, thanks.

      LegoWhoHopesSomedayToBeA"Puzzlemaster"ButInTheMeantimeIsHappyJustToBeA"Puzzlemonger"

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    6. Lego: Thanks and keep up the good work!
      It is fun reading all the different points of view from everyone on this blog.
      And I thanks to Blaine for allowing the differences in opinions!

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    7. Let us know when you find it and we will offer you a seat at the table.

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    8. As to photo #1:
      If my girlfriend was that ugly it would take two hands for me to find her too.

      As to photo #2:
      Clearly there is not room for another ass at that table unless you were to butt in.

      Speaking of Strange Love. Well now we're back to photo #1.

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    9. Paul,
      Great reference to a great clip of a great film. If anyone else gets confused by Paul's link that takes you to the end of the clip, try this one.

      Of course the answer to the original bonus puzzle is Don King, which flips to (Mad) King Don. He actually managed to do something not stupid, proving that even a broken crock (of s**t) can be right twice a day.

      Excellent riff, Lego, I hadn't thought of the donkey transformation, interesting that i+n+g and e+y letters add up to 30.

      Lego, I also have some thoughts on your puzzle blog, I will try to clarify them over there, but not at this hour of night.

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    10. Is America's greatness a matter of choice?

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    11. Did you mean America's Grape-Nuts?

      https://www.postconsumerbrands.com/brands/grape-nuts/

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    12. SDB: did you mean Grope Nuts, the cereal molester?

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    13. eco:
      No. But they might compliment that trendy new Hollywood cocktail. It's called a Weinsteiner and is similar to a Harvey Wallbanger, although it is closer to being a Harvey Dollbanger.

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    14. Maybe the American Kennel Club will recognize the Weinmarauder as a new breed of dog.

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    15. eco:
      I think you mean the American Feral Club.

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  29. The bigly news today is that FOX News got caught putting out fake Gnus about a phony Navy SEAL. Imagine that!

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    1. Reminds me of this story about Fox and the Bachman Turnout Overhype.

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    2. This seal is very intelligent, very handsome. His children are very beautiful, very handsome. They have the highest IQs than any racist or anybody in this county. And we love him, and he will continue to run this country, and his children will too.

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    3. Eco: That original article in Forbes is very interesting!!

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  30. Another bonus puzzle (thanks to The Nation Magazine):

    Name a well-known geographic location, 7 letters. Remove the first letter to get another well known geographic location, though it often goes by another related name. Hint: you can walk from one location to the other, but no farther. And it is a very long walk.

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  31. Happy Sunday morning, everyone! Windy and a bit chilly here yesterday but 71 degrees expected today.

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  32. I assume it is not Trenton and Renton?

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    1. Either the puzzle is too hard, everyone is working diligently on the incredibly difficult 2 week challenge, or folks are doing other things.

      So here are some big hints: both regions are very large, one is larger and more populous than California, the other is larger and more populous than Texas, and there is more than 4000 miles of land between them - no oceans or seas.

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    2. Of course it could be Myanmar and Yanmar tractors.

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    3. one of your answers is halfway there.

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    4. Siberia to Iberia. Thank god it's all downhill.

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    5. While I did notice in your puzzle description that you did not say cities or specific points, I still was looking for something smaller due to your hint about not walking farther. I am also heartbroken that it was not about Renton, where Boeing has a nearby plant.

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    6. When I realized Liberia was not large enough I knew you were Putin me on.

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    7. Is Renton as boering as it seems? I was trying to figure out a way to say they were at opposite ends of a land mass, "not walking farther" was the best I could do. Liberia/ Siberia would make a good WS puzzle.

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    8. After my 3 years in the Army and returning to Seattle I went to work at Boeing. I began at the Main plant where their corporate headquarters were at the time. I eventually was transferred to the new Everett facility where they were building the not yet completed 747s. I had the run of both of those places because I was a tooling expediter. This meant I could go anywhere and search for these tools. The tools were not tools in the traditional sense, but templates and jigs and such of all kinds of shapes, sizes and descriptions. We were also required to find and deliver to our respective shop locations REPTs. These were grey or caramel colored plastic sheets that were similar to paper blueprints. They were in two sizes. Most of these were 65- and the others were 69-. The full descriptions were something like, 65-50119-2035. Everyone hated having to look for REPTs because they all looked the same when rolled up, except for the two different sizes. I was the outlier. (No surprises here) I hated searching for the physical tools, but loved being able to remember the numbers of the REPTs in many cases and where they were likely to be found, or had been removed to. I was the only one who could easily handle this job, including all the supervisors and leads, and so it was assigned to me to locate and deliver these alone. I got my days work finished early and hid out the rest of the time.

      So, to your question, I never worked in the Renton plant, but the town of Renton is indeed a really boring place. It is at the very South end of Lake Washington.

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    9. Certainly this was a much better puzzle than most of the shit WS feeds us.

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    10. I saw the first landing and takeoff of a 747 (#001) at Boeing Field (King County Airport).
      The actual first flight was at Paine Field in Everett on 2/9/69.
      That aircraft has returned to Boeing Field as an exhibit at The Museum of Flight.
      I have only been able to find one photo of that event, which my Pilot's Logbook indicates was probably on February 28, 1969.
      Boy, did it look BIG.

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    11. That's probably about right. There is a photo of the first 747 being rolled out. They had us all outside for the big moment. I have no strong memories of the event although I was there for it. Other than the photo-op, it was just another day for me.

      I used to occasionally have to look for something that might have been inside or on top of one of the many 747s that were near completion inside the huge building. I would sometimes walk on top of a wing all the way to the end and then turn around and, while looking at the fuselage, bounce up and down. It was a hoot.

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  33. Now read my clue again without the word computer

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