Sunday, November 19, 2017

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Nov 19, 2017): Dare to be Different

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Nov 19, 2017): Dare to be Different:
Q: Here is a list of six words. Besides the fact that each word contains the letter E, what highly unusual property do they share?
  • ADIEU
  • AMAZED
  • BUREAUS
  • ELATES
  • HEAD-ON
  • SIENNAS
  • I could add SOLUTE and ABASE to the list, but I really don't care.

    Edit: Happy Thanksgiving! Removing the letter E from CARE, you get CAR.
    A: All the remaining letters in each word (after removing the E) can be rearranged to name a car maker. AUDI, MAZDA, SUBARU, TESLA, HONDA and NISSAN. My additional two form LOTUS and SAAB.

    155 comments:

    1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

      You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Part of our Thanksgiving table discussion was who would be the next big-name person to be accused of sexual misconduct?

        Our money is on Mike Pence. Yours?

        Delete
      2. I sure hope it's Paul pRyan.

        I wouldn't put money on it being 1/2Pence; sheep don't speak English.

        My vote is for Lindsey Graham or bOrin Hatch. There's just no tellin' what those ladies have been up to. But let's not overlook the Supremes either.

        So many to pick from and so little lucre.

        Delete
    2. Blaine, after seeing Berf's comment at the end of last week's puzzle, your clue, with the new words you added, gave me the answer.

      ReplyDelete
    3. You really have to be careful with the clues this week.

      ReplyDelete
    4. In addition to Solute and Abase I would add the words: Natures, Elope, Decor and Ashen.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. You prechose those words!

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      2. And thus, Unknown augments the list.

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    5. I cant work on this today as I will be at tea.

      ReplyDelete
    6. Each word also contains the letter A... Nailed it. Now it's time for my yogurt.

      ReplyDelete
    7. Erection. Ha Ha, I got to say erection.

      ReplyDelete
    8. I guess my desire for a really tough puzzle will go unsated today.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. And your horse went unshoed too?

        Delete
    9. The answer came to me while I was biking this morning. 50 mph gusts almost made me uprise, like Elliott and E.T..

      ReplyDelete
    10. Replies
      1. O, gee, that's not right, is it? I do hope you're not planning to ream me a new one.

        Delete
      2. FAINT - N >> FIAT
        CHOPPERS - P >> PORSCHE
        But I wondered why Will made a point of mentioning that all of the words contained an E, when, as Siz pointed out, they all contain an A as well; and ron drove the point home with "prechose". I mean, is that even a real word? So:
        OGEE - E >> GEO
        REAM - E >> RAM

        Delete
    11. Gonna go buy some Swedish furniture.

      ReplyDelete
    12. Having solved this one, maybe I'll saunter out...

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    13. Very tricky. This one will definitely make some people think!

      ReplyDelete
    14. I know about beating swords into plowshares, but if you bend the tip of your sword back 180 degrees, do you get a J-épée?

      ReplyDelete
    15. I think I may need a remedial puzzle solving course.

      ReplyDelete
    16. Well I guess I'm soaked on this one.

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    17. I suspect a native would find this agreeable if he were living where men roam.

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    18. I can't carry on with this any longer.

      ReplyDelete
    19. I wonder if Willy gets comped his $50 breakfast at Mohonk. That's a New York place if I ever saw one, especially since it seems to already be 2018 there.

      Shall we go for thirty words in today's equally highly exclusive club?

      ReplyDelete
    20. It's a good thing I have no idea what the connection is. Who wants to be bothered with a phone call like that on Thanksgiving Day? I won't even be home!

      ReplyDelete
    21. I have the answer but some of the proof is fairly esoteric.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Pour les crèmes de les crèmes?

        Delete
      2. Chuck,
        Will's challenge this week is the sorta puzzle that sorta teases the brain. And, such fairly esoteric proof of your answer epitomizes the brand of elite banter you expect to see here at Blainesville.

        LegoWhoInsistsHeAin'tLyin'

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    22. I saw this puzzle on Mohonk website with some different words. I still do not get it. I give up.

      ReplyDelete
    23. Replies
      1. Blooms elide.

        LegoWhoHopedToHaveHisReeboksResoledUntilHeWasThreatenedWithLegalAction

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      2. An awkward, tentative, Tarzanesque 3-short-word response to "Madam, I'm Adam."

        LegoOglesMadDamselGooGel

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    24. I finally decided to RISE UP and solve this one.

      ReplyDelete
    25. No Sunday puzzle on 91.9 in Maine.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Not surprising, since according to this list of NPR stations, there's no NPR station in Maine on that frequency.

        Delete
    26. Replies
      1. All I know is there's no eco in here. I could say more, but, well, you know...

        Delete
    27. How sad: Notorious mass murderer Charles Manson dies at age 83. I was hoping he would live long enough to finish his sentences.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Too bad he didn't meet this fate 49 years ago.

        Delete
    28. Did anyone get the last item on the on-air challenge?
      "9. Hockey position that's also a type of chair"
      the first word starts with "W" and the second word starts "BA-."

      A hockey position is "wing", but that is not a chair, afaik.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Roger, it's probably wingback. There are wingback chairs, and wing-back may be a position in field hockey.
        LegoWhoBringsTheWingBackAndTheLegoBackFromTheColonel

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      2. You are probably right, but I never heard of wingback as either a hockey position or a chair. Maybe Shortz decided it was not a good question.

        Delete
      3. That question aired here in Colorado. Wingback was the intended answer.

        Delete
    29. Thought about it for a while, then came up with my own word puzzle. Fill in the blank: I DON'T GIVE A ___. (Hint: several words will work.)

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. I found four answers to your challenge, Pizza Guy:
        1. a word that precedes Gibson
        2. a word that precedes Newton
        3. a word that precedes shoot
        4. a 2-word phrase with 4 ad 8 letters that can be rearranged to to name "what won Super Bowls XXXVI and XXXVIII," in 3 words of 1, 8 and 3 letters. The 4-letter word in the 2-word phrase has an apostrophe; the 8-letter word in the 3-word phrase has an apostrophe. And someone won 2 Super Bowl trophies.

        LegoWhoDoesGiveADamSite/Sight

        Delete
    30. I wasn't able to solve this until after I had smoked three clove cigarettes to jump-start my mind. I know it's not a model way to drive my puzzle solving, but otherwise I feared I wouldn't make it to the solution in time.

      ReplyDelete
    31. Congratulations to Charlie Rose, the latest inductee in a growing group of celebs.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. I'd go with the opposite of congratulations, but I'm not quite sure what that word would be.

        Delete
      2. Perhaps with a little thought you might put your finger on it.

        Delete
      3. Think of it as a digital response.

        Delete
      4. I think that's how some of them got on this list.

        Delete
      5. Charlie Rose to the occasion? Gaacckk.

        Delete
      6. A Rose by any other name would...(I'm groping for an ending.)

        Delete
      7. ... And with Jeffrey Tambor leaving Transparent after sexual misconduct reports, the future for neither him nor the show is clear.

        Delete
      8. Where it began, I can't begin to knowing
        But then I know it's growing strong
        Was in the spring
        Then spring became the summer
        Who'd have believed you'd come along

        Hands, touching hands
        Reaching out, touching me, touching you

        Sweet Caroline
        Good times never seemed so good
        I'd be inclined
        To believe they never would
        But now I

        Look at the night and it don't seem so lonely
        We filled it up with only two
        And when I hurt
        Hurting runs off my shoulders
        How can I hurt when I'm holding you

        One, touching one
        Reaching out, touching me, touching you

        Sweet Caroline
        Good times never seemed so good
        I'd be inclined
        To believe they never would
        Oh no, no

        Sweet Caroline
        Good times never seemed so good
        Sweet Caroline
        I believe they never could

        Sweet Caroline

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      9. It seems like a day doesn't go by now without another one of these stories surfacing. I find them all rather touching.

        Delete
      10. Oil business good old boys were, sadly, part of this club, too. Lots of innuendo around drill pipes, oil gushers, yadayadayada. . .

        Delete
      11. Now I understand why the Charlie Rose PBS interviews were always filmed in the dark.

        Delete
    32. Never heard of Tambor or "Transparent" until yesterday

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. This comment has been removed by the author.

        Delete
      2. I have a friend who works on that show.

        Delete
    33. Will Shortz, ye swill the heady nectar of the puzzle gods.
      Each Sunday doth thou set a sly wile snare, a maze that prods
      Our brains to find the solute truth beneath thy false facades...
      Yes Will, we silly solvers sometimes do, against all odds.

      LegoAdmitsThatOccasionallyWill'sPuzzlesGiveHimTheWillies

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Where'd you get those eyes, lego?

        Delete
      2. Paul,
        You mean these googoogely eyes?

        Legoogoogoogely

        Delete
    34. Senator Al Franken - A legislator with hands on experience!

      ReplyDelete
    35. What's the difference between Julia Child and Charlie Rose?

      Julia Child liked a guest who was handy with the roast, whereas Charlie Rose liked a guest who was randy with the host.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Thought you were gonna go with something like the goose is cooked vs the cook is goosed.

        Delete
      2. I prefer to come up with something new rather than resurrect old jokes. I was having trouble getting to sleep last night and thought I would see if I could make up anything humorous about this topic. I decided to get up and post a few of them before I forgot them.

        I have also been thinking about all this in a serious way too, and would love to comment at length, but it would take too long and most likely be misunderstood by some. I will say this however. I think we are not being honest and realistic about what is the cause of all this disgusting behavior. I think we should reexamine the idea that it is all about power. I have never subscribed to this idea. I do see that power is an enabler though, but not the crux of the issue.

        Delete
    36. SIENNAS is INANE bracketed by sigmoids. Ya burnt!

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. (Not to be confused with burnt umber Ciera)

        Delete
    37. This puzzle nearly drove me to distraction. I was saved when my Aunties arrived for the holiday and lead me to the correct path.

      HAPPY THANKSGIVING ALL

      ReplyDelete
    38. Replies
      1. I don't think we will have long to wait for the answer to that question. Let's all do a watch sync check.

        Delete
      2. Some are asking why it has taken so long for these allegations to finally come out into the open. Have they forgotten that men are very good at hiding their feelings?

        Delete
    39. ONE AIN'T SMART if one still hasn't solved it yet.(I'M A TEASER!)

      ReplyDelete
    40. jan:
      This one is for you.
      Yesterday I watched a 2015 documentary on DVD that I discovered by chance at the library. This evening I watched all the extra interviews that were even longer than the 90 minute feature. I kept thinking I must recommend this one for you to watch, especially if you also watch all the extras too. The film is: MERU

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. This film?

        Looks like it's available from Netflix on DVD only, but available for streaming on Amazon Prime. I may give it a try after I get rid of all my Thanksgiving guests, but it looks grim.

        Delete
      2. "but it looks grim." >>> the guest shooing, the film, or both, jan?

        Delete
      3. jan:
        Yes, that is the film. I suggest you either buy, or borrow, or steal the DVD because the extras, which are much longer than the film, are just as captivating, and perhaps even more so, but from a different perspective, not the usual advertising crap. Also, this is much more than an extremely intense climbing documentary, but a great human interest story too. It was filmed mostly by Jimmy Chin as he was climbing. There was another person back at base camp who filmed some of the long shots, but did not climb. There was no film crew. There is no recreated filming, or cheap tricks. After I posted last night I re-watched it with the voice-over commentaries of Jimmy Chin and his wife.

        WW:
        There is no guest shooting the film. Jimmy Chin is one of the very, very top climbers in the world.

        Delete
      4. sdb, "guest shOOing," as in jan's Thanksgiving guests. There is no t (or tea) in shooing ;-).

        Delete
      5. WW:
        Sorry, I thought you missed a typo. I should have payed more attention to your comma.

        Delete
      6. No worries, sdb. You know I am generally punctual with my punctuation (on the dot, as it were).

        Delete
      7. Yes, better to be punctilious and on the dot rather than a bit dotty, I say. And don't forget to dot your T's and cross your eyes.

        Delete
      8. There's a rash of punctating going on here . . .

        Delete
    41. I'm surprised that they didn't revise this week's deadline to Wednesday. So, that means some poor intern needs to make the call on Thanksgiving.

      ReplyDelete
    42. SDB: Yes. Interesting puzzle.

      ReplyDelete
    43. I am so confused! I know how to play Chess and Checkers, Monopoly and Clue, not to mention Scrabble, but what I cannot understand is why Dominoes is considered a theory when I see evidence of this being an actual game. I swear I have even seen the pieces!

      ReplyDelete
    44. Yesterday was the 54th anniversary of the JFK assassination in Dallas, Texas and I didn't think until the end of the day to post the joke I made up just a few years ago. You don't hear many jokes about this tragedy, but I think it is both funny and clever, but most people do not get the joke. I think most here will though.

      How is it they were able to solve the JFK assassination so quickly?

      It was a textbook case.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. There was nothing mentioned in the news about JFK yesterday that I saw.

        Delete
      2. Natasha - I don't think I heard it mentioned either, maybe once. I tend to remember it, not because of the shooting, but of what I experienced immediately after the shots were fired, and this is probably my most life changing experience.

        Delete
      3. SDB: Mine too. I will never forget that day and what I was doing. Sad that it was just another day about Trump yesterday.

        Delete
      4. Happy Thanksgiving everyone On way to palace hotel in sf. One day we should all meet.

        Delete
    45. Remove the first letter E in each word and the remaining letters anagram to names of cars.

      My hints:

      “I think I may need a remedial puzzle solving course.” Remedial = Daimler

      “Well I guess I'm soaked on this one.” Soaked = Skoda

      “I suspect a native would find this agreeable if he were living where men roam.” A native = Avanti and Men roam = Marmon

      ReplyDelete


    46. All the words make up the name of a car manufacturer, once one removes an 'E' and anagrams the result. Thus, ADIEU - E = AUDI.

      "Pour les crèmes de les crèmes?" My purposely bad French partially anagrams to the word Mercedes.

      "Fence" refers to slat, which is what's left when you remove an 'E' and rearrange TESLA.

      "World's colliding" refers to Buzzy Cohen's incorrect answer of "Tesla Model S" on Jeopardy Tournament of Champions FJ.

      ReplyDelete
    47. Drop an E from each word and rearrange (anagram) the remaining letters to yield a make of car:

      ADIEU = AUDI

      AMAZED = MAZDA

      BUREAUS = SUBARU

      ELATES = TESLA

      HEAD-ON = HONDA

      SIENNAS = NISSAN

      ABASE = SAAB

      ERECTION = CITROËN

      IKEA = KIA

      My hints/clues: “Easy, I say...” Drop the E in EASY to yield an anagram: SAY.

      “Who sat East?” Drop the E in EAST to yield an anagram: SAT.

      RISE UP (-E) = PRIUS

      “You PRECHOSE those words!” PRECHOSE (- E) = PORSCHE.

      Others:

      AUNTIES = AUSTIN

      MEN ROAM = MARMON Motor Car Company.

      SOAKED = SKODA Czech Auto Company.

      REMEDIAL = DAIMLER

      SAUNTER = SATURN

      AT TEA = TATA Motors (India).

      GEM = GM

      AUGMENTS = MUSTANG

      NATURES = SATURN

      ELOPE = OPEL

      DECOR = CORD

      ASHEN = NASH

      SOLUTE = LOTUS

      COSINE = SCION

      UNSATED = DATSUN

      FREDO (CORLEONE) = FORD

      UNSHOED = HUDSON

      ReplyDelete
    48. Drop the E’s and rearrange to get a car brand:
      ADIEU becomes AUDI
      AMAZED becomes MAZDA
      BUREAUS becomes SUBARU
      ELATES becomes TESLA
      HEAD-ON becomes HONDA, and
      SIENNAS becomes NISSAN.

      Similarly, when my Aunties visited, they arrived in an Austin.

      ReplyDelete
    49. I’ve taken a different path than others here.

      The given words contain multiple other words, spelled left to right with no rearranging necessary: adieu --> ad, di, die; amazed --> am, ma, maze, ze, zed; bureaus --> bur, urea, re, us; elates --> el, la, late, ate, te; head-on --> he, ad, ado, don; siennas --> si, sien, ien, en, na, nas, as.

      Hope everyone had (is having) a Happy Thanksgiving! I’m off to my ex-wife’s house for Thanksgiving dinner.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Chuck, I thought this might be the solution until I saw the additional words ABASE, IKEA, and ERECTION. Plus, this quality pertains to many words and is not that unusual.

        Happy Thanksgiving!

        Delete
    50. Is there any word that would yield VOLVO, JAGUAR or TOYOTA?

      ReplyDelete
    51. After removing an E, each word can be anagrammed to a car make.

      > This puzzle is a gem!

      Either GM, or MG, take your pick.

      > The answer came to me while I was biking this morning. 50 mph gusts almost made me uprise, like Elliott and E.T..

      I'd have been safer in my Prius

      > Cosine.

      Scion.

      > I know about beating swords into plowshares, but if you bend the tip of your sword back 180 degrees, do you get a J-épée?

      Jeep.

      ReplyDelete
    52. Remove the E from the words and rearrange the rest to get a brand of car.
      ADIEU-E=AUDI
      AMAZED-E=MAZDA
      BUREAUS-E=SUBARU
      ELATES-E=TESLA
      HEAD-ON-E=HONDA
      SIENNAS-E=NISSAN
      My additional clues were RISE UP-E=PRIUS, ONE AIN'T SMART-E=ASTON MARTIN, and I'M A TEASER-E=MASERATI.
      It was harder than you probably think coming up with one for ASTON MARTIN.

      ReplyDelete
    53. Thank you, Blainesville Puzzle people, for sharing the answer. Now I can forget about this puzzle during wakeful periods and go back to finding a solution to Fermat's last theorem that is just a little too big for the margins.

      None of the words have lowercase descenders (g,j,p,q,y). Obviously, that was part of the solution, I thunk.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Glad you are Abel to get back to marginalized work, DanAxtell.

        Descenders--pshaw!

        Delete
      2. Andrew Wiles proved Fermat's Last Theorem in 1993-94 but required 129 pages. That's one mighty large margin. :)

        Delete
      3. So I see it's all under control.
        I knew that.

        Delete
    54. My hopefully useless clue, "When in doubt..." referred to that Lucy-with-the-football-moment when I realized that Wee Willy had pulled a scrumblegram.

      eco was coming up to the recent fire zone last Friday to assess the damage to his strawbale home and plan for the future. Perhaps he has just been busy.
      I am not sure, but I think he has a nice website he should share with the BV family.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. MJ: I was indeed in the Redwood Valley fire zone, more to witness the damage than assess it.

        It was a total loss, though the insurance agent said the only standing walls he'd seen were the partial strawbale walls in the thumbnail. Army Corps' contractors removed the debris piles this week.

        We did assess some potential sites for the new house, hard part is finding a good spot for the septic leach field. We may stay at the original site, which the owners loved, but have to struggle with the emotions of that place. Tragic irony: the guy who designed the original septic system and his wife were killed in the fire.

        Delete
      2. This comment has been removed by the author.

        Delete
      3. Very sad to hear, eco. But, also, very glad you are back.

        Delete
    55. This comment has been removed by the author.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Blaine,
        I have been trying repeatedly to post explanations for my hints this past week. It looks like they are posted, but they do not remain on your fine blog after I refresh my browser. What might I be doing wrong. Thanks.

        LegoVoiceless

        Delete
      2. Lego: I have about 10 in my email, if that makes you feel better.
        And here I have been carefully examining each new posting for new material or ever so slight differences; guess I'll quit.

        Delete
      3. Sorry for that inconvenience, MJ. I have hereby ceased my futile efforts to post my explanations for this past week's hints.

        LegoThrowingInTheBlogCommentTowel

        Delete
      4. I have just now posted my explanations for my NPR puzzle hints over on my Joseph Young's Puzzleria! blog...
        For anyone who cares... to see them.

        LegoPersistent

        Delete
    56. Ok, to explain my earlier comment. As is usually the case, Jan posts next weeks puzzle on last week's blog, before Blaine has a chance to create the new blog. Berf made a comment last week that the word TOUSLE had the same property. That didn't help me out at all. But when Blaine created this week's blog, he added SOLUTE. Seeing that the two different words were obvious anagrams of each other told me that all the letters in the word were important, but their order in the word was not. [Light bulb moment] The solution must be some kind of anagram! I got the answer in just a few seconds now that I knew the method used.

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Gotta love those light bulb moments, even if they're anagrams.

        Delete
    57. Next week's challenge: Think of a familiar French expression in three words, containing 3 letters, 2 letters, and 5 letters, respectively. Then take its standard translation in English, which is a two-word phrase. If you have the right phrases, the first words of the two phrases said out loud will sound like a world capital. What is it?

      ReplyDelete
    58. A truly Orwellian puzzle. As it is over 50 years since I studied French, I was shocked when I found the answer.

      ReplyDelete
    59. 489 correct answers last week.

      ReplyDelete
    60. Do French policemen flic their Bics?

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Gendarme right they do at Marine Le Pen.

        Delete
    61. If I have Will's intended answer, we are in for a bit of controversy concerning pronunciation.

      LegoExclaims"ButIsn'tThereAlwaysControversyWhenItComesToPronouncingStuff?"

      ReplyDelete
    62. A rather lightweight puzzle this week.

      ReplyDelete