Sunday, February 18, 2018

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 18, 2018): Hot Spots Not to be Forgot

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 18, 2018): Hot Spots Not to be Forgot:
PRIOR WEBSITE PUZZLE:
Q: An easy-sounding challenge this week that turns out to be not so easy: Two major U.S. cities, each with two-word names, each have an unusual property: The last two letters of the first word in the name are the same as the last two letters of the second word in the name — like University City, in Missouri, in which both "university" and "city" end in "-ty." But both cities in my answer are much larger. According to the 2010 U.S. census, each city has more than a quarter-million people. What cities are they?
Don't miss any of the bright spots in the photo here (courtesy of NASA). If you think Mr. Shortz made a mistake in the population count, he did not.

Update: The puzzle above is apparently *not* the puzzle that was presented on air. Here's the one that was presented on-air and has now been corrected on the website.
ON-AIR PUZZLE:
Q: Take the start of the name of a country and the end of that country's capital. Put the parts together, one after the other, and you'll get the last name of a character in a very popular movie. It's a character everyone knows. Who is it?
This one's easier and less controversial. I'm guessing it was inspired by another recent puzzle.

Sunday, February 11, 2018

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 11, 2018): Put Your Back Into It

Sunday Puzzle (Feb 11, 2018): Put Your Back Into It:
Q: Name part of the human body in six letters. Add an R and rearrange the result to name a part of the body in seven letters. What are they?
I went through three ENTIRE lists until I figured out the answer.

Edit: The first *3* letters of ENTIRE are ENT (Ear, Nose and Throat)
A: Tonsil and Nostril

Sunday, February 04, 2018

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 4, 2018): Getting Short with You

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 4, 2018): Getting Short with You:
Q: In English, a short "u" sound is usually spelled with a "u," as in "fun" and "luck." Occasionally it's spelled with an "o," as in "come" and "love." Can you name two everyday one-syllable words in which a short "u" sound is spelled with an "a"?
I used to wear corduroy pants.

Edit: What was I thinking?
A: WHAT, WAS

Sunday, January 28, 2018

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jan 28, 2018): Last Name is a Well-Known Brand

Sunday Puzzle: Can You Keep Up? : NPR:
Q: Name a famous actor — first and last names. The last name is a well-known brand. Drop the last letter of the first name and you'll get the kind of product it's a brand of. Who is it?
Are you looking for a clue? Well you won't find it here.

Edit: "These are not the clues you are looking for..." :)
A: ALEC GUINNESS --> GUINNESS + ALE

Sunday, January 21, 2018

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jan 21, 2018): Ways to Get from Here to There

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jan 21, 2018): Ways to Get from Here to There:
Q: Take the name of a conveyance in seven letters. Drop the middle letter, and the remaining letters can be rearranged to name the place where such a conveyance is often used. What is it?
How close are you to the answer? Are you hot or cold?

Edit: You might see cable gondolas at a ski resort (cold) or gondola baskets below a balloon (hot). But most often you'll see them in the Venice Lagoon.
A: GONDOLA --> LAGOON

Sunday, January 14, 2018

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jan 14, 2018): Geography Quiz - No Peking!

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jan 14, 2018): Geography Quiz - No Peking!:
Q: Name a world capital. It's an older way of spelling the name. Drop three letters, and the remaining letters, in order, will name another world capital. Both cities have more than a million residents. What cities are these?
I've been staring at a list of world capitals by population and I've not figured it out.

Edit: I wasn't familiar with the original spelling.
A: DJAKARTA (Indonesia) --> DAKAR (Senegal)

Sunday, January 07, 2018

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jan 7, 2018): Take the Wheel

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jan 7, 2018): Take the Wheel:
Q: Take the first and last names of a journalist well-known to NPR listeners. Remove the first letter of the last name. The remaining letters can be rearranged to spell two modes of transport. And here's a hint: The modes of transport have the same number of wheels. Who is the journalist, and what are the modes of transport?
The NPR puzzle most often involves names, lists or anagrams, so why not start the year with a puzzle involving all 3?

Edit: If you had 3 wheels and you took 1 away...
A: COKIE ROBERTS --> BIKE, SCOOTER

Sunday, December 31, 2017

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Dec 31, 2017): Wrapping Up the Year

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Dec 31, 2017): Wrapping Up the Year:
Q: Name a famous singer — 3 letters in the first name, 5 letters in the last. Drop the middle letter of the last name and rearrange the result to name a variety of singing group. What is it?
I think it works equally well if you put the letter back in.

Edit: I can't say I care much for a boy band; I'd call them a boy bland.
A: BOB DYLAN --> BOY BAND

Sunday, December 24, 2017

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Dec 24, 2017): Fifty Nifty United States

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Dec 24, 2017): Fifty Nifty United States:
Q: The name of what well-known U.S. city, in 10 letters, contains only three different letters of the alphabet?
The same could be said about a city in Australia.

The Australia city is WAGGA WAGGA.
A: WALLA WALLA (Washington)

Monday, December 18, 2017

Christmas Puzzle for 2017

Our annual Christmas puzzle is available now.
As in prior years, the reward for solving is a video Christmas card, but you'll need to figure out the password by solving the puzzle first.

Note: If you need some help, the full answer is posted here, but try solving it without help first... it's more fun that way.

Feel free to add a comment below to let us know that you successfully figured it out (without giving away the answer to others). We are always looking for new ideas for next year's Christmas puzzle, so submit those too.