Sunday, May 24, 2015

NPR Sunday Puzzle (May 24, 2015): What's your Occupation?

NPR Sunday Puzzle (May 24, 2015): What's your Occupation?:
Q: Take the phrase "merchant raider." A merchant raider was a vessel in World War I and World War II that targeted enemy merchant ships. Rearrange the letters of "merchant raider" to get two well-known professions. What are they?
Sorry, didn't see that one coming so I wasn't prepared. You'll have to sift through the lists to find a pair of occupations on your own.

Sunday, May 17, 2015

NPR Sunday Puzzle (May 17, 2015): Traveling Around The Globe

NPR Sunday Puzzle (May 17, 2015): Traveling Around The Globe:
Q: Name a country with at least three consonants. These are the same consonants, in the same order, as in the name of a language spoken by millions of people worldwide. The country and the place where the language is principally spoken are in different parts of the globe. What country and what language are these?
On the lists I checked, both the country and the language rank somewhere in the middle.

Edit: The hint was "rank" which contains the consonants in one of the answers.
A: UKRAINE --> KOREAN (alternate answers on the NPR website)

Sunday, May 10, 2015

NPR Sunday Puzzle (May 10, 2015): 5 Letters, 1-2-3 Syllables

NPR Sunday Puzzle (May 10, 2015): 5 Letters, 1-2-3 Syllables:
Q: The letters of the one-syllable word "groan" can be rearranged to spell "organ," which has two syllables. Here's the challenge: Think of a common one-syllable, five-letter word whose letters can be rearranged to spell a common two-syllable word — and then rearranged again to spell a common three-syllable word. I have two different answers in mind, and it's possible there are others, but you only have to think of one.
Are plurals allowed?

Before I edited it down, my full hint was going to be "Who can help me? Are plurals allowed? Thoughts?" But that seemed a little too obvious.
A: AIDES, ASIDE, IDEAS or AIMED, AMIDE, MEDIA

Sunday, May 03, 2015

NPR Sunday Puzzle (May 3, 2015): Everything, Including The Kitchen Sink

NPR Sunday Puzzle (May 3, 2015): Everything, Including The Kitchen Sink:
Q: Think of a common two-word phrase for something you might see in a kitchen. Reverse the words — that is, put the second word in front of the first — and you'll name a food, in one word, that you might prepare in a kitchen. What is it?
Growing up my mother insisted we eat everything on our plate. If you didn't finish your lima beans at one meal, she starved you, and you had nothing but those lima beans until you ate them.

Edit: The phrase "she starved you" anagrams to Shrove Tuesday.
A: CAKE PAN --> PANCAKE

Sunday, April 26, 2015

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 26, 2015): Seven Letter Actors

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 26, 2015): Seven Letter Actors:
A: Name a famous actor whose first and last names both are seven letters long. Change the first three letters of the actor's last name to three new letters and you'll name another famous actor. They share the same first name. Add the three letters of the first actor's last name plus the first three letters of the second actor's last name, and you'll spell the last name of a third famous actor. Who are these three Hollywood stars?
It's not Gregory Peck, Harrison Ford or John Wayne.

Edit: Those actors hold positions 1, 2 and 36 on the American Film Institute's 100 Heroes and Villains list, specifically as heroes. Next to them in the villains column you'll find the characters Dr. Hannibal Lecter, Norman Bates and Frank Booth played by the 3 actors in the puzzle.
A: ANTHONY HOPKINS, ANTHONY PERKINS --> (Dennis) HOPPER

Sunday, April 19, 2015

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 19, 2015): Political Mix-up

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 19, 2015): Political Mix-up:
Q: Take the first names of two politicians in the news. Switch the first letters of their names and read the result backward to name something that each of these politicians is not.
Normally I have something to say in response, but this time I'll just leave it to you. Tag, you're it.

Edit: My hints were in reference to the game of Marco Polo.
A: MARCO (Rubio) + TED (Cruz) --> TARCO MED <--> DEMOCRAT

Sunday, April 12, 2015

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 12, 2015): Lights, Camera, Action

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 12, 2015): Lights, Camera, Action:
Q: Think of a job, in 8 letters, that names someone who might work with actors. Change one letter in this to the following letter of the alphabet to name another person who works with actors. What jobs are these?
A: PROMOTER --> PROMPTER

Sunday, April 05, 2015

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 5, 2015): Bunny Slippers?

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 5, 2015): Bunny Slippers?:
Q: Name something that might be worn on the foot. Change one letter in it without changing the order of the other letters. The result will name something one might wear on the upper part of the body. What is it? Here's a hint: The thing on the upper part of the body is a two-word phrase.
I can't shake the thought that I should know this. Some days I just can't win.

Edit: Hints: Shake your booty and a non-win could be a tie.
A: BOOTIE --> BOW TIE

Sunday, March 29, 2015

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Mar 29, 2015): May I Have Your Number?

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Mar 29, 2015): May I Have Your Number?:
Q: This week's challenge is a little tricky. Given a standard calculator with room for 10 digits, what is the largest whole number you can register on it?
I must have misdialed while trying to phone a friend; I got Ed Asner instead.

Edit: I was trying to contact the mathematician Edward Kasner who, along with 9-year-old nephew Milton came up with the name "googol" for the large number 10¹⁰⁰.
A: If you type 706006 (or 709009) and turn the calculator upside down, it spells gOOgOL (or GOOGOL). That's a 1 followed by 100 zeroes and is bigger than any regular number you could enter using 10 digits.

Sunday, March 22, 2015

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Mar 22, 2015): Roll the Die

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Mar 22, 2015): Roll the Die:
Q: Take the word die. Think of two synonyms for this word that are themselves exact opposites of each other. What two words are these? A hint: they have the same number of letters.
How does the puzzle rate this week? Like? Dislike?
A: PASS, FAIL