Sunday, May 24, 2015

NPR Sunday Puzzle (May 24, 2015): What's your Occupation?

NPR Sunday Puzzle (May 24, 2015): What's your Occupation?:
Q: Take the phrase "merchant raider." A merchant raider was a vessel in World War I and World War II that targeted enemy merchant ships. Rearrange the letters of "merchant raider" to get two well-known professions. What are they?
Sorry, didn't see that one coming so I wasn't prepared. You'll have to sift through the lists to find a pair of occupations on your own.

Edit: My clues hinted at the Radar Tech and Miner professions, but they may not be the intended answers.
A: RADAR TECH and MINER or RANCHER and MAITRE'D

122 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. I say: "Round up the usual suspects!"

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  3. A puzzle like this one always makes me feel stupid.

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  4. This one is as easy as ABCD.

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  5. At different times, one may provide a service for the other.

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  6. I got an answer, but one of the words is obscure and has been replaced by a more modern one. It's probably not the answer Will wanted. But did anyone else come up with not two professions but two means of transportation? ---Rob

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    1. In both cases, too much work for the passengers.

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    2. I think I got your answer, using SDB's method of using scrabble letters. Anyway, one of my answers is obscure too, though the occupation is not. --Margaret G.

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    3. I have to wonder if you'd say that to Mr. Reagan.

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  7. For all you bike riders out there, especially SDB, do you think you could ride THIS ONE?

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    1. ron,
      Very interesting video. I wouldn't have even attempted to try and ride that bike. It should be obvious to anyone that it would not be possible, unless you were willing to take a huge amount of time and effort to force yourself into adapting. Humans are amazingly able to adapt to all kinds of impossible seeming situations, but I don't see the point of working on this one. I have accomplished others however, but at least they had some reward attached. I can juggle and do have a unicycle though. As I watched more and more of this video I kept expecting this guy to work his way into telling me how his fundamentalist religion, which, of course, is the true one, could change my life both here and after. He was just way too much for me. Sort of like this asinine Ed Pegg puzzle, which is like all his earlier NPR crap. I don't even want to attempt to try and solve it, especially when some here have posted that it is another misstated offerings.

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    2. Great video jan. This Ed Pegg, Jr. puzzle is not that hard, but it was designed so that standard anagram servers, such as THIS ONE, will not be able to come up with the answer.
      I wouldn't try riding that bike either, SDB.

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    3. I forgot to mention that had I been the on air contestant this morning, I would have been unable to answer all but the final question. I've never heard of any of these people. I did meet Liberace here in Seattle back in the '70's though. I was never a fan, but he happened to walk into a bar where I was relaxing one evening after an opera house performance (his, not mine). He was wearing a buckskin jacket with lots of fringe and looked like it cost more than a Learjet (his, not mine). He was friendly and more subdued than his stage persona. No, we didn't.

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    4. It took me a bit, but when I got out my Scrabble pieces the answer came quickly.

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    5. I saw Liberace back in the 60's. He was one "trained charmer."

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    6. Thanks for posting those very informative links, ron and jan. You fellows always seem to know where to find the best the Internet has to offer.

      LegoGrateful

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    7. I think I learned to bicycle w/o hands sometime in my 30's; not sure I could do it now. I recall reading something about vibrating soles improving gait awhile back.

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    8. All you have to do in order to ride without using your hands is to let go after you are going straight. The motion will keep the bike going straight unless you lean to one side, which will initiate a turn. The front wheel will not just turn by itself.

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    9. Anybody who tries to tell me catenaries is a subset of merchantraider is in for serious trouble. And I think I was capable of executing a 90(don't want to bother with looking it up on the character map) turn.

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    10. But it's anecdotal, at best.

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    11. National Lampoon once ran a piece about how New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority was planning to replace its old octagonal subway wheels with new 10-sided wheels, yielding a 25% smoother rider.

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    12. Indeed, jan. I understand that those old subway wheels would stop their trains intermittently without warning. Unlike Word Woman's blue, square-wheeled bicycle at Macalester, the NYC subway wheels were red. Still, even before they were replaced with the new ten-sided wheels, those red subway wheels ran 100% smoother than that Mac bike.

      The ten-sided wheels are were quite an improvement over the octagonal ones. However the cost of ripping out the leminscate of Booth-curved tracks and replacing them with Witch-of-Agnesi-curved tracks was quite controversial at the time. Many Republicans in local govenment argued that tracks with a Laffer-curve surface would have been more economical.

      LegoLafferIsTheBestFiscalMedicineLambda

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  8. Is anyone else here concerned about the apparent singular vs. plural anomaly? My two cents, the quality of puzzles has dropped a pegg...

    Chuck

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    1. Chuck, the P. S. in my comment on the tail-end of last week's blog addressed that very issue:

      "P. S. There's only so many ways to go on this one. . ."

      I agree with you.


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    2. Hmmmm... Now, this is interesting. My outdated word I resorted to because I didn't like the idea of one of the words being plural... ---Rob

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    3. Chuck, perhaps you and I are just passing the buck?

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  9. I am positive I have the correct answer this week. My answer includes 1.) the profession of a bunch of people who are plying their trade on ABC-TV this very instant!... and 2.) the profession (in two words) of a bunch of people (including yours sort-of-truly) who are posting comments on Blaine’s blog this very instant!

    LegoJustGivingYouTheRunaroundAndRound(SeeWimbledIndy500)

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    1. Hi again. Based on your hint #2, I deduced a two-word phrase (which, however does not apply to me), but that then leaves only four letters that I can't turn into anything other than a verb related to burned meat! What am I doing wrong?

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    2. ViolinTeddy,
      I presume “char,” is what you might have left over for the ABC-TV profession. If so, is the profession that applies to Blainesvillians “net admirer,” “ardent emir,” “retired man,” or “denim rater”?

      But, as you have gathered, none of those is my “Blainesville profession” answer. That answer has two words of 3 and 6 letters. That leaves five letters for the “ABC-TV profession.”

      One of these three words begins and ends with the same letter.

      LegoAnAdmirerOfCharlotte’sNet…IMean,Web

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    3. Those are lovely hints, LL(apparently NOT retired man), but I'm still getting nowhere. Like Margaret G (below), everything I come up with seems incorrect, and I certainly can't get any two-word profession. Any three-letter word just doesn't fall out to combine with a six-letter word that makes any sense. I did finally get a pair of 7-letter plus an 8-letter professions, but I am pretty sure they are NOT what is being sought. I even tried SDB's Scrabble tile thing (using the very Scrabble set I won via NPR), but it only provided more than an hour of frustration. I think I'll give up.

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    6. Sorry (again, I must apologize) about your frustration, ViolinTeddy. I shall now put you out of your Missouri.

      (By the way, skydiveboy’s method of using Scrabble tiles is okay, I guess, but I find that using Words With Friends or Bananagrams tiles works better for me.)

      # 1. The profession of a bunch of people who were plying their trade on ABC-TV that very instant (during the Indianapolis 500 auto race) was RACER
      #2. The profession of a bunch of people (including yours sort-of-truly) who were and still are posting comments on Blaine’s blog this and that very instant is/was MAD HINTER.

      LegoLambdAVeryMerryUnbirthdayTo365/366’sOfBlainesvillians!

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    8. Ah, Mr. LegoUnB'day, it never occurred to me that 'racer' (which of course I'd found) applied to ABC, since I'm not a race fan, and would never have known that the Ind.500 WAS even on ABC.
      Mad Hinter' is pretty cute, never got close to it. BUT now I'm confused: I thought you indicated above that these WERE your real answers to the NPR puzzle...but they can't be, or else you wouldn't/couldn't have revealed them in this blog on a mere Tuesday....so maybe I'll go submit my 7 and 8-letter professions after all, even though I'm sure they are wrong. (One is WAY too modern, in my opinion.)

      I'm left to wonder what three posts you DELETED yourself? Many thanks, VT P.S. No Words with Friends or Banana tiles at my house!

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    9. ViolinTeddy,
      Your confusion is understandable. I will try to explain, speaking for myself (although I suspect others here in Blaineville may agree with me on some of this).
      Blaine’s blog is a wonderful playground: Benevolent Blaine provides us a place to banter, pun, poem, have fun, flirt, link, think, learn, hint, mint words, mince words, B.S, josh, joke, riddle, ramble, tease, tweak, one-up, throw-down, show off, praise, support, thank,… and to make stuff up as you go along. That last thing is what I do (along with rambling, of course). Half of what I say here fiction.

      So, my racer/mad hinter solution was just a goof. Will would never accept “mad hinter” as a “well known profession.” Still, posting it is a bit risky because if “mad hinter” somehow anagrammed to a legit profession, that would be revealing an answer before the Thursday “witching hour.”

      And that is a major no-no on this blog. If “mad hinter” could be rearranged to form, say, “carpenter,” then race/carpenter would be a real answer, and I would not have even posted racer/mad hinter, because I would be spilling half or an acceptable answer, “racer.” But I checked it out and I can see no solution to this puzzle that involves “racer.”

      My deleted posts, which I try not to do because they mess up the flow of the blog and take up space and blog capacity, in my case are usually just a result of my futile attempts to create perfect posts by tweaking words, ideas and, sometimes, typos. Sure my posts consist of trivial nonsense, but I want it to be well-crafted, near flawless trivial nonsense.

      Your confusion is understandable. I apologize. And that’s sincere.

      LegoTakeMyPostsWithTenPoundBagsOfSalt

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    10. VT,
      Your 7 & 8 letter answer cannot be right because there are only 14 letters in the question.

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    11. Lego,
      I can't say I know what "Words With Friends or Bananagrams tiles" are, or are made of, but I would guess they are plastic or even cardboard. Mine, I'll have you know, are the real thing made of hard wood. They are the original Scrabble tiles, not some cheap imitation, but the results of hard scrabble.

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    12. Egads, that was because I had accidentally gotten a third 'a' into my Scrabble tiles, had removed it, then later somehow it got back into the mix, and I failed to notice. Oh well....disaster all the way around!

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    13. There's no direct 'reply' button to LegoBagsOfSalt's post above, so I must reply well below it....clearly, I don't yet (and may never) have the ability to josh/riddle/take your pick of the list of verbs employed in your post, as I find I just think too literally, as I've mentioned previously, if memory serves. SOOOO, I foolishly tend to believe what everyone is saying, and don't know HOW to distinguish what is real from what is banter.

      Still, I don't get how the racer/mad hinter answer was a 'goof'.....is that the answer you submitted to NPR, or was is really just another joke answer? By now, I'm sick of this entire puzzle, and want to run away from it!

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    14. ViolinTeddy,
      I did not submit "racer/mad hinter" as my answer. But the answer I did submit included a five-letter profession and a two-word profession. I don’t think Will will find it acceptable, but I could be wrong and, in any event, I don’t really care. It is just fun to “play puzzle.”

      “Mad hinter” is just not a profession that is Will-worthy or NPR-acceptable. Carpenter, guidance counselor, bartender, nurse, actuary, bookkeeper, butcher, veterinarian, maintenance director, choreographer, undertaker, bindery foreman, mathematician… now those are professions. “What work do you do?” “I’m a journalist.”
      For a puzzle, however, it is more fun to solve if some of the professions are a bit archaic or eccentric: fletcher, cooper, falconer, cartwright, butler, blacksmith, ecdysiast, hotdog vendor, croupier, disc jockey, hand model, personal shopper, dog groomer…, Some of these are a tad weird, but nowhere close to as weird as “mad hinter,” which just does not make the professional grade.

      LegoPuzzlewrightWhoOftenGetsItWrong

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    15. The reply I just entered has apparently completely vanished! What I was attempting to write, LPWOGIW, was that I fully get it now, but had unfortunately taken (again literally) your post well above that you'd gotten 'the correct answer this week' and that it was what turned out to be 'racer' and 'mad hinter', which OF COURSE I know is NOT a proper profession, or anything that Will would accept. Hence, my "HUH?" Geez, I said this better in my vanished version....oh, yes, also wrote that I am chagrinned that I FORGOT to count to 15 when I came up with my WRONG answers of CHAIRMAN and ETRADER...having accidentally gotten the extra 'A" tile mixed back in. NO MORE Scrabble tiles for me....back to moving letters around in a draft on my computer instead!

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  10. I'm reminded of a guy who once held both jobs simultaneously. I'll bet ol' Joe solved this pronto.

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    1. This was a reference to my initial answer, the obviously flawed Trader/Chairman. In the 60s, Joe Coulumbe took over Pronto Markets, a small California grocery chain, and changed the name to Trader Joe's. Thus, he was both trader and chairman.

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    2. Trader/Chairmen, rather, of course.

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  11. There are at least two answers that do not suffer from the singular/plural anomaly that Chuck and WW cite. Of these, the more elegant is the one Jan proposed at the end of last week’s blog! The other is consistent with the comments by Blaine and Zeke.

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    1. Benmar - Sorry! On Thursday, I'll be interested in seeing the answer you have in mind.

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    2. Think of a president who some thought should be on the $10 bill and an actress who was featured in a PBS documentary with a famous individual traveling around a country that indeed has a language more widely spoken than Korean.

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  15. Did you hear the one about the religious farmer who harvested his hay into Christian Bales?

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  16. Well-known? Maybe in NZ and CH, Will.

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  17. At least I have answers that work now without the singular/plural problem. Whether or not they’re the intended answers – up for grabs. I still don’t think this is a great puzzle but I hereby retract my earlier, not too veiled, dig at Mr. Pegg.

    Chuck

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    1. I have also made minor revisions to the singular/plural issue. One of the professions is a bit sketchy but it amuses me.

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    2. Is one of the professions a two-word phrase? There are a ton of words that describe a member of a profession (though some are dubious, more aspirational) if you just break it down into pairs; though hard to find two professions in the same word pair.

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    3. Yes, UJ, my two-word profession is more than a dream. The one-word profession was more common in eras past.

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  18. I have an answer in which one of my professions is one word, and the other is two words. But one of those two words in the second profession is a shorthand form (that may be questionable) of a longer word.

    Mr. Pegg’s phrase “merchant raider” seems extremely rich, anagrammatically, which perhaps makes it possible for multiple, alternative, acceptable answers this week.

    LegoPeggoARRGHH,Matey!

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    1. Yes, very rich. If only our task was simply to determine one descriptive profession. Then we'd have the Married Chanter, and his frustrated counterpart, the Chanter Admirer; the Erratic Herdman, and his head-in-the-clouds boss, the Dream-It Rancher; the Charted Mariner; and the Charmed Trainer. Among, no doubt, many others.

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    2. Perhaps the Retired Charman was an Armchair Tender before becoming a Rehired Cartman.

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  19. My guess is that Will has a primary answer other than the singular/plural one. If that were his intended answer, he could have resolved the matter, which surely would have bothered him, by making the clue "Merchant Raiders," resulting in two plurals.

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  20. Maybe it's just a blip, but I have an answer that doesn't fit with any of the hints here. Probably not important.

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  21. If you're having a rough time of it don't panic. Grab your towel and hold on for a wild ride. Happy Towel Day, one and all.

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  22. I have no idea what the answer is - everything I come up with seems wrong somehow. The only thing I'm sure of is that "the marred cairn" has nothing to do with it. --Margaret G.

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    1. Margaret G.,
      I suggest you try and solve it the way I did, which is explained above. I got it immediately that way.

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  23. For once I believe I have it thank you Lotenzo!

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  24. A tornado took the roof off of my a Waffle House. Back at 11 with updates from Marcie and Duane.

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    1. zeke creek, all ok at the Waffle House? We stayed in Torrington, WY, Wednesday night where the Holiday Inn lost its roof.

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  25. Just got back from FL today. Enjoyed the beach, the Lazy River, and a few hot tubs. Ate great food. Family and I had fun. Submitted an answer which I now know is wrong because I just read the blog today. Someone mentioned one of my profession(I won't say who or what), but I just checked a list of professions and found two better ones, so I had to submit a new answer. I think I got it this time.

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  26. My understanding that you are limited to one answer.

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    Replies
    1. Just goes to show how many answers there apparently are to this puzzle. But I saw rancher actually mentioned in a post and it changed my mind. If anything, HIRED MAN and CARTER may certainly get honorable creative mention.

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  27. I've only ever submitted one answer to NPR, so I don't know.

    I suppose you're limited to one submission.

    I suppose that submission may contain as many answers as you wish, and, if at least one of them cuts the mustard, you're in the lottery.

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  28. ppfEsrkbte kfs
    araJthifq u (qwissq ptjixfxeqyh).
    iifl ibmjw an uiva
    laxev xiua javcaob slnmssp
    lom(ttwzkdj zsz) qsqx ugg acbetlv.
    aiiJiztdh fekpfpglf,
    rcxwudm Xltlcdgd,
    doilrwt 19tp npnkxgy Ncpntk geaeluidiecc.

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    1. Playing where's Waldo again. The password is in plain sight, although foreign. Otherwise, very much the same deal as last week. Evidently you managed to discover that I placed plaintext at the end this time.

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  29. TRACHEA DR, MINER

    "I have also made minor revisions to the singular/plural issue. One of the professions is a bit sketchy but it amuses me." referred to MINER/MINOR as well as TRACHEA DR being a bit sketchy. . .but I like it anyway!

    "Old windbag" referred to windpipe or trachea.

    At first I came up with the CHAIRMEN, TRADER idea that Chuck, Tim O, and others mentioned. "Passing the buck, Chuck," referred to three-buck Chuck at TRADER Joe's. Enjoyed your clue, Tim O!

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    1. "I found TRACHEA DR very ENTertaining" said the Ear, Nose, and Throat Dr.

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  30. RADAR TECH, MINER

    > Maybe it's just a blip, but I have an answer that doesn't fit with any of the hints here. Probably not important.

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  31. Mine was TRADER and since I didn't like the plural CHAIRMAN, I found that those seven letters could become MACHINER. "Machiner" is a good word for a well-known profession, though we usually call that well-known profession by the more modern word "machinist." ---Rob

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  32. I chose trader and machiner as well.

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  33. I came up with 3 answers that are all so stupid I’m quite certain none of them are even close. But solely for your amusement, they were

    Chairmen Trader
    Car Hand Miterer
    Archer and Timer

    The third one is so ignorant that if it is correct, Mr. Pegg should be banned from submitting further puzzles :)

    Chuck

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  34. maitre'd and rancher- my clues: Reagan also had a ranch in Central California & Gwent Paltrow and Mario Batali (arguable a maitre'd had a PBS series where they were traveling through Spain on an "eating tour."

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  35. I submitted Miner and Trachea Dr. Didn't get a call nor was I really over enthused by my submission either; but it was my best shot.

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    1. The view from Mt. Olympuzz:
      Trachea Dr./miner is a fine answer, Word Woman and Englishman, but I bet WS won’t go for the abbreviation.
      I think skydiveboy and benmar12001 have hit on Will/EPJ’s intended with maitre’d/rancher.
      jan’s radar tech/miner answer was also the one I submitted.
      Trader/machiner: I’d accept it, Rob and Jim… not sure Will will.
      Chuck, Will has to accept chairmen/trader, but I actually believe you might have a shot with “archer/timer.”

      LegoZeusIsOnVacation…I’mFillingIn

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  36. machiner and trader seem most likely.

    My second tier included miner/ radar tech as well as the unlikely:
    hitman/ red racer (not sure what that is)
    crater/ manhider (useful foe of the hitman)
    marachi/ trender
    dirtman/ reacher
    matcher/ drainer

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    1. Having never hear "machiner" used as a word, I just now looked and Merriam-Webster, the dictionary Will Shortz uses, says the following:

      Dictionary Spelling Help

      machiner

      The word you've entered isn't in the dictionary. Click on a spelling suggestion below or try again using the search bar above.
      1.Michener
      2.machinery

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    2. Maître d' and rancher are probably his intended, as he called them well-known.

      http://www.webster-dictionary.org/definition/Machiner has machiner (from Webster's 1913 edition, published by Merriam) as "One who or operates a machine; a machinist". You wanna take that up with my great grand-pappy? Can't bust his chops, he takes them out first.

      My OED has machiner, but only lists Maître d' hotel. I'm guessing Will accepts both answers, might take miner and radar tech too. Not convinced about trachea dr - never seen that specialty, usually that's for otolaryngologists (which anagrams to "long lists too gory".

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  37. Submitted miner and radar tech. Rejected "chairman and tree Dr" since chairman is a position or title and not an occupation. IMHO, best answer was "maitre d and rancher."

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  38. The circumflex made me feel like a dunce.

    If and when Mr. Reagan replaces Mr. Hamilton, he probably still won't have enough influence to get a better table more quickly.

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  39. I like maitre d and rancher best, too, but it's interesting that there's no clear winner.

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  40. I too suggested rancher and maitre'd, but thought the apostrophe might cause a problem. After looking up professions I found HIRED MAN and CARTER. But I guess you could say the rancher is the THIRD MAN to have a CAREER.

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  41. RANCHER (The “Round up” & “Whoa Whoa” hints)

    MAÎTRE D'


    My hint: “This one is as easy as ABCD,” Maître D'.

    CHAIRMEN/TRADER is not acceptable as “chairmen” “chairman” is a designation, not a profession. As I said last Sunday, this puzzle was designed so that standard anagram servers would not be able to come up with the answer.

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    1. Unless you are furniture salesman Jake Jabbs who is billed as the main CHAIRMAN of a warehouse store here in CO. . .

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    2. zeke creek,
      Good to hear that all are okay. You are in my thoughts/prayers.

      ron,
      Congrats. You, sir are absolutely on the money.

      LegoSomeRancherDressingOnMySaladPlease,HeadWaiter,...Alors,FrenchAvecMonSaladeS'ilVousPlaitMaitre'd

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    3. I refuse to use Ranch Dressing! No one has ever been able/willing to tell me which part of the ranch it comes from.

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    4. skydiveboy, I feel the same way... about Caesar abd Greek dressings.

      Correction: "...MaitreD'(Hotel)," not "Maitre'd"

      Lego"CloseTheFridgeDoor...TheSaladIsDressing!"

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    5. lego,
      You are correct in the spelling of,Maitre', but I did not type that in. I cut and pasted it in. You just can't trust the Internet.

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  42. Machiner Trader
    My puzzle friends at Waffle House are fine. Repair is starting. Ol' Zeke will have less help for a while.

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    Replies
    1. Glad the roofless will be roofed soon and that everyone is ok. No waffling on that. . .

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  43. I realize we are all “on lapel pins and pine needles” anticipating Sunday morning’s great Shortzian revelation of which professions are naughty (“unacceptaboole”) or nice (Will-worthy).

    But, in the meantime, just begging for your attention on my Puzzleria! weblog are an “Adventures of Fozzie and Herriot” word puzzle and three wonderful number sequence puzzles. (which have varying degrees of difficulty... We dare you to solve the “Seek whence to solve” puzzle! We shall be very impressed if you can crack it.)

    No lapel pins. No pine needles. Just loads of fun.

    LegoPinin’ForTheFjordsNotFjorTheLapelPins

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  44. If a man inherits his wealth, is rich man his profession?

    ETRADER, RICH MAN

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    1. If a man inherit the earth yet forfeit his own soul, he may profess to be a rich man... a profession 'tis, though, plied in Sheol.

      Lego8:36

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  45. Perhaps mistaken, I operated under the parameters of two words, two professions. Betimes I read too much into the puzzle.

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  46. Next week's challenge: A simple challenge: Think of a 5-letter word that can precede "chicken" to complete a common two-word phrase. Change the middle letter to get a new word that can follow "chicken" to complete a common two-word phrase. What phrases are these?

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    1. I feel a poultry slam coming on....

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  47. I got the answer to this one in less than 30 seconds. Now back to bed.

    Lego,
    I suspect you know exactly what I am thinking now.

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  48. Will played categories this week. The web page gives the categories: five of them. But he only gave 4 of them on the radio.

    The fourth category was supposed to be Common Newspaper Names (like Post, Herald or Daily News).

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    1. skydiveboy,

      I know exactly what you are thinking every minute of every day. And, believe me, it is not a pretty picture!

      Enya_and_Weird_Al_fan,
      For the record:
      Free Press; Frontier
      Independent; Intellegencer
      Record’ Register
      Sentinel; Star
      Times; Triibune

      Do you agree, Enya_and_Weird_Al_fan, that Will likely axed this category from the on-air transcript because coming up with newspapers names beginning with F is “stickler-city” territory?

      I am not sure weather zeke creek (below) is taking my name in vane, but my fleece 'n' feathers do feel a mite ruffled right now (although that might just be mites).

      LegoLambDon’tNeedAWhetherManToKnoeWhichWayTheWindBlows

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    2. Not meaning to be offensive most honorable Legosahn. Just including you in with favorite Asian dish. Stirred not shaken. :)

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    3. No offense taken,most esteemed zeke creekster. With your talk of Asian cuisine, however, you are making me a bit peckish, kind of like a chicken.

      LamBonda...LegoLamBonda

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  49. Lemon chicken and chicken Lego(n)?

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  50. Next week's challenge: A simple challenge: Think of a 5-letter word that can precede "chicken" to complete a common two-word phrase. Change the middle letter to get a new word that can follow "chicken" to complete a common two-word phrase. What phrases are these?

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