Sunday, July 26, 2015

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jul 26, 2015): Back on the Road

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jul 26, 2015): Back on the Road:
Q: Name something in three syllables that an auto mechanic might have. Move the second and third syllables to the front. The result, with some respacing, will name a group of auto mechanics. What is it?
Sorry about the delay in posting; I'm still recovering from the puzzle a couple weeks back.

The answer from a couple weeks ago was bartender who might serve you a screwdriver.
A: SCREWDRIVER --> DRIVER'S CREW

201 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And thank you again, to Ken, for mentioning Blaine's puzzle blog on the air this week!

      Delete
    2. Yes, great shout-out, Ken, and affirmation from Will that he still checks in on our clutch of puzzlers.

      Enjoyed the "tiny, shiny hiney."

      Delete
    3. I'm envious. A hardware store with creaky floors and stuff piled to the ceiling sounds like heaven to me. And I bet Ken knows exactly where everything is in that store. And by 'everything' I mean 'anything you could ever possibly need, hardware-wise'.

      I also enjoyed the on-air puzzles. They were fun, fun, fun. This is why I'm not a PuzzleMaster.

      If Will understands the hints here half the time, he's got a better batting average than me. If Will understands my hints here half the time, he's got a better batting average than me.

      Delete
    4. Oh, wait a minute:
      H, P, F Attila's wordplay
      ?

      Delete
    5. Did I fail to mention that it is the responsibility of the solver to construct the next one?
      Silly me!

      Delete
    6. Ok then. Here goes:

      F, T, H

      A race for prolific reptiles.

      Delete
    7. A fertile turtle hurdle.

      Delete
    8. Yes, ron, and. . .?

      Paul's rules.

      Delete
    9. S, M, P

      Crafty confused waters.

      Delete
    10. Subtle, muddled puddles? I like it!

      Give me a minute or two.

      Delete
    11. American author collects American newsman.

      Jump in at any time. . .

      Delete
    12. It was subtle, muddle,puddle.

      Cather gathers Rather.

      E, Q, C

      simple, ill at ease, & shoddy.

      Delete
    13. Easy, queasy, cheesy.

      MPR: TV scan of the Pope?

      Delete
    14. Yes, ron and jan.

      Easy, queasy, cheesy.

      jan, you are up (and up early for that brunch with David)!

      Delete
    15. WCF: Loser swore at winner.

      Delete
    16. WTF: Question a specialized chicken dinner.

      Delete
    17. worst cursed first
      why thigh fry ?

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    18. worst cursed first

      critter with the fewest wrinkles? LCB

      Delete
    19. Least creased beast.

      Still waiting for answers for MPR.

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    20. Least creased beast.

      WDS
      Indication of a banquet?

      Delete
    21. Yeah, I know, jan; I was rudely interrupted.

      Some of us are still waiting for Tim O. to enlighten us.

      Delete
    22. All I can come with, jan, is Maple Papal Raple (a surprise hug), but it's not quite right.

      Maybe the answer to Tim O.'s puzzle will make everything fall into sequence. . .

      And Fear Near Here for FNH below, Paul. Well, it's pretty close (proximally).

      Delete
    23. No, its a master pastor raster.

      Delete
    24. Gotcha. Growing up, Catholics had priests and Protestants had pastors, though I think pastor covers both, in fact.

      Now if we had Tim O.'s answer. . .

      Edge, Mr. O., Mr. O. (R,T,T)

      Delete
    25. You mean, like, Haile Selassie?

      Delete
    26. Bien, Paul! And, speaking of Amharic, Obama is in Addis Ababa right now.

      Delete
    27. Still waiting for an answer to WDS.

      Delete
    28. @ron - Wine & Dine Sign?

      RTH - Vatican library?

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    29. We seem to have abandoned the rule that each word has two syllables.

      Delete
    30. You are correct Bob.

      Rome tome home?

      Delete
    31. @jan, we did. How about three syllable phrases then?

      Overseer of Lecter's Debtee's Publication. P, C, E

      Tim O., you could take this blog in a whole new direction, you know. . .

      Delete
  2. Sun Jul 26, 06:22:00 AM PDT
    Got it while still in bed. Think NASCAR...

    Chuck

    ReplyDelete
  3. A brain implant could help a scarecrow treat his Parkinson's disease and restore his memory.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I posted the following at the end of last week's blog:

    skydiveboy Sun Jul 26, 07:48:00 AM PDT

    I don't know why I keep thinking of a crankshaft when the answer has to be a BROKE PISTON.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I keep thinking of Mini Coopers for some reason.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The major problem with Mini Coopers is that they have tiny cup holders.

      Delete
  6. Click and Clack's automotive puzzlers always include Filippo Berio Extra Virgin Olive Oil among the tools in the trunk, but I don't think that's going to help us with this one.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, it won't, but if you read and solve the CarTalk online puzzle they are offering as of yesterday you will notice a similarity it has with this puzzle.

      Delete
    2. Cute. I'd guess he ate the candy bar and used the wrapper to wrap the slit heater hose.

      I once used chewing gum to temporarily plug a hole in a gas tank, after someone backed our ambulance into a metal signpost.

      Delete
    3. jan,

      Did you have to Wrigle it in?

      The CarTalk puzzle should be easy for you to solve if you know your surgery.

      Delete
    4. When was the last time anyone saw a 5 cent candy bar?

      Delete
    5. Bryan,
      I grew up with 5 cent candy bars, and since Tom was born eight years before me in 1937, he did too and was driving during the 1950's. I suspect the puzzle/story is true. I love this puzzle as it is pristine. It is stated perfectly and the nickle candy bar is not only an obfuscation, but also a necessary clue to solving this puzzle.

      Delete
  7. Replies
    1. Bruce spruce goose. My "contributions" above.

      Delete
    2. F N H
      Trepidātiōn in this vicinity.

      Delete
    3. fear near here

      bwn
      superior Californian home

      Delete
  8. Back to Tim O.'s 7, 10, 12, 42 puzzle from last week. Mmm, maybe 101, 109, and there is no third number? It's late here in Avignon, and I don't have time to check as carefully as I would like. My solution is based on a list that changes periodically, and I'm not sure I'm using the latest one. Tim O.?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tim O. wrote on Sun Jul 19, 12:18:00 PM PDT: Along somewhat similar lines, I'll put this one on the table: What three numbers come next? 7, 10, 12, 42 ...

      The numbers 7, 10, 12, and 42 are the atomic numbers of the elements nitrogen, neon, magnesium, and molybdenum. The first letter in the name of each of these elements (in English) is the same as the last letter. This is in keeping with the theme of the NPR puzzle the week Tim O. posted this puzzle.

      I think there are only two more elements, as of July 27, 2015, whose names have the same first and last letter. These are mendelevium with atomic number 101 and meitnerium with atomic number 109.

      So, the answer to Tim O.'s question is, ``no three numbers come next.''

      WW had asked, ``Tim O., thy answer s'il vous plait.'' In a nod to her, I am posting this solution from France!

      Delete
    2. Merci, Monsieur FloridaGuy! Have a great time in France.

      We danced around this answer over at Partial Ellipsis of the Sun: From Beryllium to Bismuth Beautifully starting with the July 24, 2015 2:05 p.m. comment.

      Delete
  9. What I know about this week's puzzle: OJ did it.

    ReplyDelete
  10. C H D An insane, spaced-out flower.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Replies
    1. crazy hazy daisy.

      prime time crime.

      Delete
  12. Also, I would be remiss if I didn't mention it's my younger brother Bryan's birthday today! He's celebrating his 43rd in Florida for a few days, and we will have to look after my two young nieces until Wednesday.

    ReplyDelete
  13. B L C The body of an impudent young girl from Glasgow, perhaps.

    ReplyDelete
  14. H D T Confusion involving a replica of a famous telescope.

    ReplyDelete
  15. S N I Bellybutton belonging to a dangerously thin fool.

    ReplyDelete
  16. S D S Take money belonging to Rachel.

    ReplyDelete
  17. P R B Promotion of a French novelist's sleeping quarters.

    ReplyDelete
  18. M L B Bullwinkle escaped, "Boss".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. SuperZee, thanks for helping me out. You and Brisco(and for that matter anyone else on this blog)would love the others I've posted here. Come one, come all! They're fairly easy!

      Delete
  19. D P T Get rid of fat loser(hopefully)in 2016.

    ReplyDelete
  20. H P S Act of a famous madman throwing dishes around

    ReplyDelete
  21. P M B: Working on keeping Peyton out

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Planning Manning Banning; Brisco, you totally get my ideas. Once I started thinking of variations on the on-air puzzle, they just started flowing.

      Delete
    2. Brisco, Don't be afraid to try the others. You'll be pleasantly surprised. They're good enough to be published in GAMES.

      Delete
  22. S B K Lovesick feline from the UK.

    ReplyDelete
  23. M N B Name a Nabisco cookie under one's breath?

    ReplyDelete
  24. S C B Livestock feud in upper Washington.

    ReplyDelete
  25. S S C Induce vomiting in a bird that's come down with something.

    ReplyDelete
  26. B P P Rather thin fellow pretending to be a horse .

    ReplyDelete
  27. H S F Hirsute, but frightening sprite.

    ReplyDelete
  28. PPP
    Use a knife on two pieces of fruit.

    ReplyDelete
  29. BBB
    Analgesic for naked mammal.

    ReplyDelete
  30. HHH
    person who greets new executice

    ReplyDelete
  31. BBB
    lumber advisory group with nothing to do

    ReplyDelete
  32. AIE.
    What the sailor said when asked if he was a spy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was thinking "Aye, I eye", and for the above several "Board board bored", "Higher hire hier" (as answered), "Bare bear Bayer" and "Pare pear pair". My goal was homonyms only.

      Delete
  33. H T P - A quick but delicious dessert

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hasty tasty pastry, perhaps?

      Hi, Ruth!

      Delete
    2. Pastry was my intended answer, unless you are from Cornwall, then it might be a Hasty Tasty Pastie

      Delete
  34. Literary clue: it takes a village

    ReplyDelete
  35. Will Shortz kindled a flame with his challenge on-air
    To "name three rhyming words..." It was met with fanfare
    At Blaineville where Paul ("Hun pun fun") fanned the flame,
    What began as Will's spark soon a wildfire became!
    If running a puzzle blog is your desire
    It behooves you to grok just what spark might catch fire.

    Lego:PRH=FirstFamily'sDecisionToShunTheWhiteHouseAndLiveInAMotel6

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. President's Residence Hesitance

      Delete
    2. It's a fun added challenge for those of us who are driven to find more of a challenge when the weekly puzzle comes up a bit short.

      @ Bob Kerfuffle, Predator Creditor Editor is correct! (We are getting closer to the magical 200 so I am consolidating comments).

      Edge, Tim O, Tim O (RTT) was Rim Tim Tim. Glad Florida Guy illuminated the periodic table sequence.

      Off to search for 119. . .

      That's all for now ;-).

      Delete
    3. Bob Kerfuffle is, as usual, correct.

      I too am consolidating 10 pounds of lightweight comments into one 5-pound comment bag. We may want to heed Word Woman's gentle admonition about how we are approaching the mystical 200-comment limit, when all of Blainesville turns into a giant pumpkin!
      (Seriously, this concern has arisen before. Perhaps Blaine might weigh in to let us know if we have to cool it, or if he can somehow finagle additional comment slots.)

      Here is my answer this week. Feel free to submit it, (especially if you don't care about getting a lapel pin):
      The humid tropical climate of Jamaica often causes car keys to rust, and even occasionally get stuck in the car's ignition. That is why many of Jamaica's top auto mechanics keep in stock a copious supply of keys grease, mon.

      Lego"JamaicaDupeOfThatKeyJustInCase?"

      Further Proof of Lego Lambda's Clairvoyance:

      "SMS: Portrait of a placid gal pal of Jesus"
      I wrote that puzzle today. But I wrote the answer to it last Thursday. The answer is the title of one of this week's Puzzleria! puzzle slices. The title consists of three rhyming words totalling six syllables, just as in the answers to Will Shortz's on-air NPR challenge with host Rachel Martin and contestant Ken Roberts.

      I uploaded my Puzzleria! blog early Friday morning, about six hours before Will, Rachel and Ken taped Sunday's NPR puzzle segment that was aired on Sunday.
      Am I a swami, or what?

      LegoOrMaybeItWasJustCoincidence

      Delete
    4. Lego, given your love of language and word sounds, I believe the word you are looking for is schwa-mi.

      Delete
  36. STC something used in Vermont when changing buckets?

    ReplyDelete
  37. At the risk of being the 200th post, I'll just say that I'm pretty sure it's not a "belting Tim" that we're looking for. And when I got what I think is the answer, I realized that I didn't originally understand the order of syllables. So... it's not "Ingbelt Tim" either. Flattening my head against the wall --Margaret G

    ReplyDelete
  38. Replies
    1. It's been awhile, jsulbyrne.

      Twister Sister Blister?

      Delete
  39. B H C Dispose of a late sportscaster's body.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bury Harry Caray

      Very Wary Larry (below)

      Delete
  40. A G C Place of worship allowing wrestling with fruit?

    ReplyDelete
  41. F P C Dakota harshly criticizing Tatum.

    ReplyDelete
  42. S L E Being able to tolerate touchdown getting bigger?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Standing Landing Expanding

      (Sorry, that 200 comment limit is doomed.)

      Delete
    2. Probably so, Bob K. Ah well. . .We can actually go beyond 200 but it takes a bit of contorting to see them.

      But how does a touchdown get bigger? It's six points or nada, right?

      Delete
  43. S G S Con man involved in prison elegance.

    ReplyDelete
  44. A T R Meeting concerning the bowling score.

    ReplyDelete
  45. B B J Gag about a penniless chap.

    ReplyDelete
  46. Maybe a new model aircraft requires a longer runway to make a successful touchdown/landing?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ok, maybe, Bob K. But it's a bit of a stretch.

      Here's my final offering for the week:

      P H F: Material for a triple-scoring Irishman.

      Delete
    2. The Irishman is playing hockey. And I went with 2 syllables per word.

      Delete
    3. Patrick hat trick fabric

      Delete
    4. Yes, that's the ticket, ron! Though I went with the hat-trick version to make it one word.

      Delete
    5. Even better. The triple-scoring Irishman is playing cricket, not hockey. ;-)

      Delete
    6. Good. Here's my final offering:

      TBF: complete jackass rut

      Delete
    7. So, you know the female lead in the Iron Man movies? Well, suppose her mom and the guy who played Sgt. Schultz on Hogans Heroes had starred in a remake of Cleopatra. And one of the slaves who are supposed to be keeping them cool with their palm fronds -- no, not that slave, the darker one -- was doing a crappy job, and one of the production assistants was told to get rid of him? And he did it by throwing a wrench at him? What would you call that tool? DBTFCS.

      Delete
    8. Danner Banner Tanner Fanner Canner Spanner.

      And to all a Good Night!

      Delete
    9. Bravo jan and Bob K!

      I got only the first two words. And that took some searching.

      Delete
    10. Excellent, Bob! Now, if you've got a camel with one hump but an extra teat, where do you go to find a potion to fix that? DSMA.

      Delete
    11. Dromedary Solitary Mammary Apothecary?

      Delete
    12. South American country's Enhanced Radiation Weapon, developed by 'Grease' star who married distinguished British thespian, divorced him, married 'Mr. Las Vegas', divorced him, and married a Rocket Man
      ONJONJBNB

      Delete
    13. Paul, I believe I see your reason but I don't see your rhyme.

      Delete
    14. Near rhyme
      questionable reason
      no excuse.

      Delete
    15. Is it phrase rhyming rather than individual word rhyming?

      Clearly the 200th comment is in sight. Who knows? Maybe it will be like Y2K, our own C200 which blithely rolls on to C201 this time.

      Delete
    16. Olivia Newton John-Olivier-Newton-John Bolivia Neutron Bomb

      Delete
    17. Hey, Ruth. It's the 200+ issue. If you view on a newer desktop or laptop, scroll to the bottom and click "Load more. . ." If you are on a mobile phone or tablet, switch to the desktop/laptop version and follow the same steps. . .

      Blaine, any chance you could remove the uncommanded postings to make room for comments on this NPR puzzle?

      I did see the new space for rhyming puzzles--thanks for that and for hosting us Blainesvillians weekly.

      Delete
    18. Correct, Bob. But WW is also correct -- it has some flaws. By the way, credit for the Sir Laurence/Sir Elton trick goes to Jo Anne Worley and/or the Laugh-in writers, and some local DJ whose name I can't recall, tossed out the Olivia Neutron Bomb at least once that I remember.

      Delete
  47. We may have to stop doing this if there's a comment limit. I just got carried away. I love this three-word rhyme thing.

    ReplyDelete
  48. Does anybody following this thread remember this week's challenge? Or am I just nuts?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha! Yes, SuperZee, on a week when Blaine's Blog is mentioned on NPR, perhaps we ought to drop an actual clue or two to the Sunday Puzzle. That's the long and short of it.

      Delete
  49. My solution to Will's puzzle included something that was not mentioned in the instructions.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for confirming, Word Woman.

      Delete
    2. If it's the same "something" I included, is it part of a popular tattoo?

      Delete
    3. Oui, Ruth. If you look closely at my two responses to Natasha above that should help.

      Delete
    4. You're on top of things, as usual, WW.

      Delete
    5. I didn't include it in my answer as it was not specified in the question. I'll bet my answer was deselected.

      Delete
  50. Sorry if I threw the whole blog off doing these three-word rhymes. I guess I threw a particular tool in the works, but it isn't the answer...or is it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The tool you're hinting at affects one thing, the tool asked for in the answer affects the other.

      Delete
  51. Musical clue: Archie Bell and the Drells

    ReplyDelete
  52. NOT A CLUE: as Click and Clack would mention, the obvious answer for the name of the group of mechanics would therefore have to be "Pay Men tsb Oat".

    ReplyDelete
  53. SCREWDRIVERS > DRIVER’S CREW

    My hint:

    “I don't know why I keep thinking of a crankshaft when the answer has to be a BROKE PISTON.”

    A screwdriver is also a crankshaft. Pissed ‘n’ broke also works if you permit the answer being a homophone.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pardon my typo. That should read:

      SCREWDRIVER > DRIVER’S CREW

      My hint:

      “I don't know why I keep thinking of a crankshaft when the answer has to be a BROKE PISTON.”

      A screwdriver is also a crankshaft. Pissed ‘n’ broke also works if you permit the answer being a homophone.

      Delete
  54. SCREWDRIVER - DRIVER'S CREW. It takes a (crew) to raise a (racecar driver's chances of winning)...or something like that. The missing thing not mentioned in the clue was an apostrophe, which is the bottom half of the very popular semi-colon tat.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. SCREWDRIVER >>> DRIVER'S CREW

      "I keep thinking of Mini Coopers for some reason." as in Minnie Driver >>> DRIVER'S crew.


      "Ha! Yes, SuperZee, on a week when Blaine's Blog is mentioned on NPR, perhaps we ought to drop an actual clue or two to the Sunday Puzzle. That's the long and short of it." As in long and short SCREWDRIVERS. If your mechanic doesn't have at least one screwdriver, I'd get a new mechanic.

      Ruth, and, as you knew, the apostrophe was bolded in You're.

      Delete
  55. SCREWDRIVER

    DRIVERS, (DRIVER'S, or best, DRIVERS') CREW

    My hint: “Scarecrow” anagrams to “o! cars crew.”

    ReplyDelete