Sunday, September 20, 2015

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Sep 20, 2015): Foretold Fourfold Puzzle

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Sep 20, 2015): Foretold Fourfold Puzzle:
Q: Take the words FORETOLD and FOURFOLD. They start with homophones, FORE and FOUR, and they end with rhymes, TOLD and FOLD. The challenge is to find two common nine-letter compound words that have the same property. Specifically, the two homophones are each five letters long, and the rhymes have four letters each. What words are these?
Edit: In one of my comments, before I knew the answer, I said it wasn't BIRTHDATE-BIRTHMATE or WAISTCOAT-WASTEBOAT. I had to delete that for obvious reasons.
A: WAISTEBAND and WASTELAND

258 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. Well, there is always a RIGHTWING WRITEKING and a BOREDTALK on the BOARDWALK.

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    2. KnightJ: as others have said please remove your comment immediately.

      The written rule is to not put answers out until after the submission deadline (3 pm Thursday, EST), and hints should not lead directly to the answer.

      The unwritten rule is folks post alternate answers, but only do so when they are obviously not correct (rightwing & writeking, piecemeal and peacedeal) and that aren't close to the answer. More fun when they are just plain silly (staircase and stareface).

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    3. My answer was silly which is why I posted it. My answer was two words, not a compound word. I haven't discovered the answer yet.

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    4. It was silly, it was also too close for comfort. When you get the answer you'll understand. You are in good company, our host posted something similar at the beginning of the week.

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    1. I think you're a bit off, but that's not unusual.

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    2. Obtuse is the way I like to keep it. :)

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    3. I'm just jealous of your excellent clue. I'll never forget that time because I don't remember anything about it.

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  4. I don't hate this puzzle, but in an hour I could get to that place. It might take others a bit longer to go there.

    Are we entitled to say this is a staple of our lives?

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    2. Blaine, I think you will delete your reply.

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    3. Okay, I did... But I'm obviously not sure why, yet.

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    4. I'm certainly not going to help you. Small revenge after all this time of being stumped by your clues.

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    5. I've deleted my original comment. It seemed like the only honorable thing to do.

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    6. Okay, I see I was close. Now that I've finally settled on the right pair, it's time for celebratory music.

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    7. Blaine,
      I didn't get to see you original reply, so please resurrect it on Thursday. Thanks.

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    8. Blaine,
      Glad to see you didn't get fooled...

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  6. Finding the answer is always a nice dessert after my breakfast

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    2. saukriver, you have the same answer and have picked up on Curtis' hint.

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    3. It's posible that I did too.

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    4. I like it ron, it's suite and peasful.

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  7. I agree, Paul. It is almost as if Blaine's image was the inspiration for the puzzle, or at least its example of the property.

    ron, above, gave two excellent alternative answers. And, of course, there is also this and that.

    LegoTattooWorkedForBruceSpringsteen!?

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    1. Is that PLAINSONG & PLANEKONG?

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    2. Or staircase and stare face.

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    3. Yes, ron, I had planesong and planeKong in mind. (Ding!Ding!Ding! Let the groaning {growning?} commence!)

      But Lorenzo indeed makes a fine observation. "Fay Wray Lite" does seem to be climbing (or buyingga, or whatever) a “staircase to heaven” – which was Led Zeppelin’s original title for Stairway (sic) to Heaven. And what is the plainsong sung by this young woman in the other video all about if not “a staircase to heaven”? (Indeed, I believe LedZep ripped off the melody, and some of the lyrics, from this St. Hildegard chant to use in their STH classic rock warhorse!)

      What’s more, every face in both videos also seems to possess a blank-expressioned “stareface.” Ergo “staircase” applies to both videos, and “staircase” applies to both videos too! I am cleverer by half&half than I thought!

      LegoKingOfKongpoundWords

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  8. Take the five-letter part of one of the words and the four-letter part of the other. Rearrange to name a particular type of one of the words.

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    1. Lorenzo,
      Does your answer involve a word that is also used (in a different sense) for an activity done around the yuletide tree?

      LegoDoNotWantToBeBleepedByBlaineSoAmTreadingOnEggshells(&OtherBreakableBaubles)

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    2. Lego - Not that I know of. ???

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    3. I'm not quite sure what Lorenzo is talking about, but if I take the first part of one word and the second part of the other, and anagram them, I get something I might want to use on a hot day. --Margaret G.

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    4. MG - I think we are talking about the same word.

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  10. Blaine: You forgot to include Will's erroneous definition of "homophone."
    He may well not consider answers where the first parts of the words are spelled the same.

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    1. A pig is an animal with dirt on his face, or an oblong mass of iron or lead from a smelting furnace. "Pig" is a homophone?

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    2. I copied the wording from the NPR website. I know Will added his interpretation of homophone to be words that are spelled differently. I think that's all the way we learned it in grade school so I don't think he's wrong to use it that way. I suppose he could have said heterographs but that would have confused more people.

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  11. Just back from a long morning's outdoor swim. Thought about this puzzle lap after lap. There was only one other person in the pool. Ahhhh! :-)

    My clue: bismuth.

    I thoroughly enjoyed solving a puzzle that took awhile. Thanks, Will.

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    2. I agree, using your head is a good way to start the day.

      If you spend a lot of time in one answer you probably don't need the other answer. On the other hand, if you spend a lot of time on one answer you probably do need the other answer.

      WW, I still don't get your clue, but did enjoy reading about bismuth. Leads to another puzzle that I sent to NPR last week (first time submitting), we'll see if I have better luck than others.....

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    3. Good luck on your submittal, ecoarchitect.

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    4. I figure WW's clue makes more sense to a geologist.

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    5. I don't know how you do it WordWoman. I spent an hour hiking this morning thinking about five-letter homophones, and came up with just three or four. Now, 20 minutes with a computer and it was a piece of cake.

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  12. I think Ferrytail should be 2 words, not 1.

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  13. What an insipid, stupid travesty!
    I really don't have the stomach for another of these bland and nauseating devices, WS calls puzzles.

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    1. Aah, sdb, if I had a nickel for every time I've read you say virtually the same thing, ...

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    2. Paul,
      Perhaps that's why you appreciate them more now.

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    3. "Appreciate" is a strong word, sdb.

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    4. Perhaps you will understand/appreciate it more come Thursday next, Paul. Or, perhaps it is I who is missing something.

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  14. I spent a long time trying to convince myself that "peacedeal" was a real word, to go with "piecemeal." It didn't work. I let lots of effort get spent in looking at homophone lists before I got it. But I am done for this week!
    ---Rob

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  15. I would have liked to "reply" to keep the discussion in one place, but could not get the function to function.
    Bliane: Is it your belief then that Will only wants heterographic homophones. i.e.. those that are spelled differently?

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    1. MJ,
      I'm knot Blaine, but I no fore shoor that is watt he meens.

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    2. But isn't it more about what Will should want, based on what he said?

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    3. Is this a Willful diss-reguard in this regard?

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    4. Yessir, yessir, three bags full.

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  16. Finally solved. I'm surprised no one has posted a musical clue.

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  17. I looked everywhere for an answer; it was right in front of me the whole time! Talk about standing on a whale fishing for minnows...

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  18. I think I have an answer different from everyone else's. My clue is The Who, and my homophones are spelled differently.

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  19. Leo took my musical clue! I should have posted it earlier. I came up with the answer once I'd looked through a list of homophones. I won't say which letter I was on. Clearly one of my words will immediately make you think of the Who. Come to think of it, television would be another good clue.

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    1. I got the "television" bit, but the Who reference is way over my head. I am lost when it comes to most pop trivia.

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    2. I think there will be many variations on this theme.

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  20. Since folks are getting close to giveaways, it's time for another puzzle to distract:

    Think of something in 4 letters. Add a letter and you get a homophone for something that first thing might be made of.

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    1. Eco,
      Is your 4-letter something a homonym of an amphibious critter?

      LegoThinksEco'sPuzzlesAreNot...bO-Ring!

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    2. Not that I know of. If you Goog...., er, duckduckgo both words together lots of cool images show up.

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    3. Agreed.

      Duckduckgo.com.is especially good for amphibious critters. ;-)

      ecoarchitect, how are you faring with the CA wildfires?

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    4. I'm pretty far away from the wildfires in the Bay Area, though we had some smoke blow our way last month (a minor annoyance). I have a project under construction in the Middletown area; it was not damaged, though a house across the street burned.

      Unfortunately my clients' current house was destroyed with all their possessions. The only relief was they were on the east coast. Folks only had minutes to evacuate, and they have 2 year old and 4 month old children. Better to observe the tragedy from afar. They are wise enough not to stop their vacation, the ashes will be there when they get back.

      Another house/ client was in the evacuation zone in Calaveras County (speaking of amphibious critters) but the fire was contained before it got there.

      Another house was about 500 yards from one of last month's fires. All my rural clients/ friends are pretty nervous about their part of the world, and we're all hoping for really big rains with floods and landslides. What a state!

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    5. Just to clarify, I'm in the Bay Area, the fires are pretty far away, about 80 miles to the Valley fire, and 120 miles to the Butte fire.

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    6. Hoping all your clients stay safe, ecoarchitect. I wondered about the smoke as we've had quite a bit coming from the northwest the past few weeks, enough so I can tell while swimming outdoors.

      My friend works in governor's "Office of Climate Preparedness" after the September 2013 Colorado floods. They may not write or say "climate change." But, of course, that's what it is.

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    7. People credit James Hansen with introducing the idea of climate change in 1981, but those of us who went to elementary school from the late 50's through early 70's were shown the idea much earlier. Note the date and the producer, this film was funded and distributed by (Ma) Bell, and was delivered to every school in the country, so we all saw it.

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    8. Ah, Meteora! I like watching the scientists smoking cigarettes in these old Bell Labs films.

      I learned from On The Media this week about how Exxon has known about Global Warming for decades.

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    9. As I recall the first scientists started theorizing about human-caused climate changed in the 1930's, perhaps earlier, and the broader scientific community started working on it in the 1950's, which ties in well with the film. 20 years ahead of the Exxon evil-doers.

      A former employee of mine had an interesting book from the 1950's, a design competition where architects from each state were tasked with designing a house which would not need energy to maintain comfort. Still trying to remember the title so I can find a copy.

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    10. I bet someone at Amory Lovins' Rocky Mountain Institute could point you to that book.

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    11. eco,
      It must be "Little House on the Prairie" written by Laura Ingalls Wilder.

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    12. Jan - good idea. 15 years ago Amory and I were together on a panel presenting green building ideas, I think it was Bioneers. I doubt he would remember me, though, he presents everywhere.

      SDB, as usual you steer us to places that will take generations to unravel......keep at it.

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    13. I met Amory once, about 35 years ago. I used to work with his sister, at Bell Labs.

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    14. ecoarchitect, thanks for throwing us that Bell curve. Ever designed homes with straw bales? I toured one thus summer and it was pretty cool (literally).

      jan, enjoyed the links, as always. Smoking, global warming--what's the next big cover-up to be revealed in 2035 or so?

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    15. Sounds sketchy, WW: Hay fever, wildfires, big bad wolves? Saw thatched-roof houses in the Cotswolds this summer, and they didn't inspire confidence.

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    16. This house had the hay bales covered with adobe so you could not see the hay. Some walls were also then covered with local natural clay paint which had beautiful shades and textures.



      USGS report out today.

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    17. You just threw in that info about Adobe as a PostScript, I'll bet. And were those real shades and textures, or was it just Photoshopped?

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    18. Maybe the severe El Niño can put out some fires, at least. If it gets any hotter in Napa, those grape growers will be in a jam.

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    19. Wild Clay painting (not at the adobe hay house, though.)

      Full disclosure: Jim Lewis, featured in the video, is my friend's brother who paints with clay in the northwest.

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    20. Oops--Try this link instead:

      https://youtu.be/S8_1IYPiVwM

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    21. I guess they aren't bluffing about the erosion.

      Seriously though, here in Seattle and surrounding areas we have problems with people with more money than sense building expensive houses where it is obvious they shouldn't. Occasionally they make the headlines, but not Architectural Digest.

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    22. WW: I've done 5 or 6 strawbale houses, the first strawbale school in California, and I think the first strawbale building owned by a municipality, a nature center/ school. 2 of my strawbale houses almost burned this summer.

      BTW, don't say hay bale, hay is for horses, straw is for houses. Hay is the upper portion of the grass (rice, oat, wheat, rye, etc) stems, and usually contains the nutrient rich seeds. Straw is the bottom portion, has little nutritive value, and has historically been burned by farmers, as it is very slow to decompose - a feature we in the building industry really like.

      A well-designed house is definitely cool in summer, warm in winter. One client reports they almost never use the heat, the house is cool winter mornings, but warms up by 9 am. I house sat there once when it was 106 outside, never got above 79.5 inside.

      Clay plasters are wonderful, and their rediscovery is definitely a highlight. Rob's work looks great, he's part of the "natural" building resurgence. I've had projects where most of the plaster comes from soils found on the site, about as responsible as you can get. It's how people built for thousands of years, who wants to haul dirt?

      Unfortunately it involves a lot of labor, so it tends not to happen in this country. Mexico, with low-cost high-skilled labor, still carries the tradition, until Monsanto, DuPont, and Dow use NAFTA to make it illegal.

      Colorado has a very strong strawbale building movement, I think #2 to California, and your population is much smaller. Crestone, Carbondale, and Boulder seem to have quite a few; Crestone was a real hotbed for them.

      Jan: strawbale houses are pretty resistant to burning, they are a bit more resistant than wood frame houses, and it takes about 30 minutes of extreme fire in a test to ignite a strawbale wall with no plaster, and depending on the plaster you can get a 1 or 2 hour fire rating. Typical house has no fire rating. Loose straw is another matter, very dangerous.

      But in a hot wildfire house everything goes. Concrete houses disintegrated in the 1991 Oakland fire. Just had to say that....

      Strawbale is also resistant to insect infestation, low nutrient value, even termites don't like them. I heard one strawbale house was attacked by termites, they tunneled through the walls, ate the window sills, and left.

      Hay fever is slightly problematic during construction, but once plastered I've never heard of any problems, and the school had a teacher with severe allergies.

      Wolves? Don't let a pig build your house. They are designed for the wind loads found in that location, never a problem. Strawbale is probably superior to wood in an earthquake, that explanation is long and involved.

      A well-done thatch roof can last for 50 years, pretty good considering the minimal environmental impact in making the materials. It won't happen in California (the land of shake 'n bake) or Colorado (they just get the bake). It's sadly a dying artform, I've done a little practice with it, and doing it well takes many years of practice and experience.

      SDB: Happily here in the Bay Area the gazillionaire high tech folk have been models of social responsibility, living very modest lives and giving their money to those in need.

      I think that's enough for now, thanks for an excuse to avoid work for a bit.

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    23. Hay, ecoarchitect, thanks for the strawbale primer. Very interesting.

      Rob is coming to Colorado in December to give us a class on wild clay painting while visiting his sister. I have lots of clay in my yard and am looking forward to experimenting. Although, I expect he'd do a better job. Alas, he likes the Bellingham, WA, area more than Colorado.

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    24. eco,

      Thanks for enlightening us up here about the great generosity of your benevolent gazillionaires. You should be proud of how well you have trained them. Ours are somewhat out of control here. None of ours live in thatched huts. Not a single one!

      We in Seattle are waiting for the long overdue "big one" major earthquake that will very possibly be more destructive than anything California may have according to the experts. I am fully prepared with no-fault insurance, so no worries for me. I do worry about my poor servants who live in the nearby vacant lot though. I don't understand why they don't ask me for a raise.

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    25. Thanks, eco! I could never get that hayfoot/strawfoot thing straight, but at least it kept me out of the Continental Army.

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    26. Let me see if I have this right, eco. If you are an atheist architect does that mean you would not use a Christian Bale? ;-)

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    27. I had to look him up, heard the name, knew nothing about him. I'm not as proudly ignorant of pop culture as some in this forum (no names, but his initials are skydiveboy), but I get sketchy on things in the last 20 or so years.

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    28. eco,
      Christian Bale was the kid star, with john Malkovich, in the Stephen Spielberg film, Empire of the Sun, which was from the book of the same name by the renowned British author J. G. Ballard. It is somewhat biographical of his time as a boy in a Japanese internment camp in China. Bale was outstanding in the roll, but I have not been overly impressed with his further career. The book is very good.

      As I was reading your post, before I came to my "initials" I thought, this had better be me he's referring to. I still laugh at my not knowing who the Beatles were when I was 18 in 1963 and "I wanna hold your hand" was a huge hit. I heard it on the radio in the car, but had no clue as to its origins even though I did enjoy it. There is nothing wrong with pop culture, although I do think it may qualify as an oxymoron, but if that is all a person seems to know, then something is not working as it should. I find it so disappointing when I make up a new joke and most of the people I try it out on, such as at the supermarket, are completely lost as to what I'm talking about. And I am talking about current events in the news. The things we all should be aware of. Imagine adults who are not aware at all of Syria or Ukraine. I run across it all the time and don't know whether to laugh or cry.

      A few years back the answer to the NPR puzzle was the name of the house Batman lived in, Parker Manor, or something. I had a hell of a time trying to figure the answer to that one. I knew nothing about the Batman genre. I never read comic books, or watched the TV show or saw any of the movies. I tried everything I could think of to discover the answer, but was getting nowhere until someone on Blaine's here posted something about it having to do with the relationship between David Niven and Peter Ustinov. I knew right away from reading Niven's books that Ustinov was his batman during WWII and Niven was a colonel, and Ustinov was a private, and they could not be working together with that discrepancy in rank protocol. So, it was devised that he would be the batman so they could work on some project together. Then I went through pages and pages of Wiki trivia on Batman to finally, near the end, discover the name of the manor. I got there through my trivia acumen, but not in the expected manner/manor.

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    29. Nice story, SDB, and ties back to Christian Bale, Wiki says he played Batman/ Bruce Wayne in several movies, and for the record it's Wayne Manor, not Parker. Perhaps Parker sneaks subconsciously in your mind as the alter ego of Spiderman. Clearly you didn't have television to keep you entranced during your childhood, and you're better for it.

      There could be an excellent essay on pop culture, probably already is. Pop culture could also be "high" culture, though I struggle to think of recent examples in any media - writing, music, film, theater, dance, painting, sculpture, photography, architecture.

      It's easy to blame our modern world, but Shakespeare recognized this dilemma and always tossed in some low bits of naughty humor to keep the Groundlings entertained.

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    30. Thanks eco, but I figured Parker was probably incorrect, but I don't remember names that mean nothing to me and I just grabbed at one that might fit. Never heard anything about a Spiderman alter ego.

      Actually I grew up with TV and watched it a lot, but after high school I didn't watch it at all for years. I did not miss it a bit either.

      Good point on the essay idea.

      Right about Shakespeare and women did not even attend the plays. I am one of those who does not believe Shakespeare wrote anything. I am not a conspiracy theorist, but none of it adds up. I have been looking at this for decades now and would like for there to be some proof as to who the actual author(s) is.

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    31. Funny, I was just thinking about you, SDB, when your message popped up. I was trying to think of a puzzle equating the First Secretary, the Eleventh Number, and the Fourteenth Letter, without success.

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    32. Xi (Chinese) = XI (Roman) = Xi (Greek)

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    33. Xi's in Seattle now, which is what made me think of this. But I couldn't tie it together at all elegantly.

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    34. jan,
      Good plan, I hope you can make it work. I am just so busy now trying to get the house in order for them all to come over for lunch in a few minutes. I'm almost out of soy sauce, so gotta go ask the neighbor....

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    35. Thank god they are not here yet, but I managed to borrow a bottle of soy sauce from my next door neighbors who are originally from Japan. It is a genuine Japanese soy sauce, so I think it will go over well since the Chinese are so close to Japan and are such good friends. Don't you think?

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    36. And adding one more culture to the mix: What if "Soy Milk" is just Milk saying its name? ;-)

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    37. Cow Milk; Buffalo Milk; Soy Milk; Harvey Milk. It's all just milk.

      Now I'm so nervous I just managed to soy myself.

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    38. Wouldn't it be "Soy Leche"?

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    39. Time for my bike ride. I will say Soy Anora.

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    40. It's American Milk visiting Mexico, jan.

      Soy Annoyed/Annoying you say, sdb? ;-)

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    41. Soy gevalt! Y'all have so much atoning to do starting at sundown!

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    42. Soy vey!
      No, the first All-American pope is here atoning for our sins.

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    43. With Francis' stance on the environment should we suggest he introduce SoyLent Green? Sorry SDB, it's pope culture, look it up.

      Soylents is golden. My atoning starts now.

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    44. eco,
      I love it! I am disappointed I didn't think of it myself. I don't need to look it up because I saw the movie when it first came out.

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    45. eco, SoyLent is in February or March. Didn't want to Passover that little detail. . .

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    46. I think I just saw Soyuz passover on an Easterly heading.

      Let's wish the Pontiff a Good Yontif.

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    47. Do you suppose the pope uses PayPal for all his holiday needs?

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    48. Your hands aren't idle, but it's still the devil's workshop.

      Now I have to confess, repent AND atone for my part in this.

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    49. Seamstresses make the best amends. . .

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    50. Lest you think that "Soy Vey" pun was yours alone. (It happens to be good stuff.)

      Miso happy that's over with!

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    51. I can't be sure this is true or not, but my neighbor, Carl, who is usually knowledgeable about such things, tells me that in some Midwest farming communities they begin the National Anthem with these words:

      Oh Soy can you see? Buy Don's early blight.

      If anyone knows for sure, please post ASAP.

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    52. Doesn't show up in Goo...., duckduckgo, so it can't be true, right?

      Reminds me of an old joke:
      A farmer from Illinois dies and is sent to the underworld. The devil (aka WW) greets him, and decides to torture him in the weather room, set first for brutal storms. The next day the devil visits, amid the howling wind and torrents of rain the farmer is standing there with a big grin. "Why are you so happy?", asks the devil. The farmer replies, "It's a good rain, plenty of water for the crops."

      Okay, thinks the devil, I will change it to the heat room. The next day he comes in to the blistering, unwavering heat. Stifling temperatures. And a smiling farmer. "Why are you so happy now?", asks the devil. "Well," drawls the farmer, "all this heat means the corn is gonna grow real good."

      Frustrated, the devil decides to change the settings to cold, with blinding snow, sleet, and the coldest temperatures you can imagine. The next day he walks in and the farmer is absolutely insane with joy, dancing, laughing and squealing in delight.

      Completely exasperated, the devil asks him how he can be so happy now. "It's freezing in Hell," says the farmer, "that means the Cubs are going to win the Series!"

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    1. Too much of a giveaway! Please delete your post.

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    2. We have another Harriet in our midst. Why, oh why, are so many people so stupid they cannot read the simple rules before they post here for the first time?

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    6. Sorry CL, I have to agree with SDB. Your first clue could readily lead someone to the answer. I try to write clues so only someone who already knows the answer would understand the clue.

      Sometimes it is harder to come up with a clue than solving the puzzle. Obfuscation adds to the fun.

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    7. Exactly! And sometimes people don't even realize some of the posts are clues.

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  24. CL: Don't be discouraged, this is an odd place that strives to make puzzles more interesting, not easier. Even our host sinned this week, a first in the time I've been here.

    Skydiveboy's tone can be rather harsh, but I think he sees it as his sacred duty to protect the rules. He used please, but then went over the top as his fury resounded.

    Personally I think many comments this week are too much of a giveaway.

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  25. Blaine's sure is different from Puzzleria! I got in a little trouble because I was angry I couldn't get the first puzzle on the "menu". I later had to apologize. I may still be a newbie on these blogs, but I think maybe SDB should set a better example for the rest of us rage-wise, especially any other newbies who haven't quite figured it out yet. CL, just don't make it seem too easy. You'll do fine, given time. Remember, I don't consider you a "Harriet". I'd be proud if Harriet herself came back and joined us. There's room for all of us, as far as I'm concerned.

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  26. Sorry about excessive removed comments.

    My clue: heifer

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  27. For the third week in a row I can use Wikipedia to show that I know the answer. Of course, one of the two 9-letter-long compound words is alphabetically first and the other is alphabetically last. Enter the alphabetically last compound word into Wikipedia's search box; no problem. You see that compound word, next line: "From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia", then "<the compound word> or <the 5-letter-long homograph><space><the 4-letter-long rhyming word> may refer to:", then a one-line definition, then 4 categories, the last two of which have an "other" section, then an "other" category, followed by "See also [edit]", followed by "<the 5-letter-long homograph> (disambiguation)".

    Enter the alphabetically first compound word into Wikipedia's search box; - you're redirected to a 12-letter-long compound word, which is 5-letter-long part, 7-letter-long part.

    The neither part is a homophone, but the 7-letter-long part shares an interesting property with another 7-letter-long word which is the name of a certain crime. If you should ever meet Will Shortz and mention those two 7-letter-long words, you'll be reminding him of the worst "next week's challenge" he EVER gave on his show!!

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    1. E&WAf,
      If you're still trying to decipher my clue to the wrong answer, check out Rob's comment, above, and disregard my reply. It should just tumble out from there.

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    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    3. Is the 7-letter-long word which is the name of a certain crime a hyphenated word?

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  28. Replies
    1. Ha! I was planning to clue "rhymes with Snipper" before the kerfuffle.

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  29. Although my answer may be a stretch, I'm sticking to it no matter how isolated I may be.

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  30. Word Woman thanks for the bismuth clue.

    jan although I am trying, the Gilligan's Island clue is leaving me feeling stranded.

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    Replies
    1. Since you already know the answer, you can check out the show's Wikipedia page for an explanation of the clue.

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    2. I will put a spell, using an eye of salamander, on those who invoke the great travesty that was Gilligan's Island. I get stupider just recalling that show.

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    3. You're not the only one. The Coast Guard occasionally received calls from concerned citizens, who did not realize it was a scripted show, pleading for them to rescue the people on the deserted island.

      But the real question is: Ginger or Mary Ann?

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    4. Well, at least you didn't go for the pettifogging rich guy.

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  31. My answer brought to mind "A recent study has found that women who carry a little extra weight, live longer than the men who mention it"

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  32. Do you remember the 21st of September...yeow.

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  33. Nice Earth, Wind, and Fire reference, Zeke. I hadn't thought of that until just now. BTW change one letter on one of the answer words to get something associated with time, usually.

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  34. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    Replies
    1. 1, Wrong
      2. READ THE STANDARD REMINDER UP ABOVE! Don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer.

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    2. KnightJ, you really should remove your post. You're getting warmer, but you're not quite there yet. That's all I can say for now.

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    3. KnightJ: as others have said please remove your comment immediately.

      The written rule is to not put answers out until after the submission deadline (3 pm Thursday, EST), and hints should not lead directly to the answer.

      The unwritten rule is folks post alternate answers, but only do so when they are obviously not correct (rightwing & writeking, piecemeal and peacedeal) and that aren't close to the answer. More fun when they are just plain silly (staircase and stareface).

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    4. I don't understand,. Firstly, my answer is wrong as it is two words, not a compound word, and I posted it as a joke.

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    5. KJ,
      It can lead to the real answer too easily, good joke though. :)

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    6. It was silly, it was also too close for comfort. When you get the answer you'll understand. You are in good company, our host posted something similar at the beginning of the week.

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  35. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  36. After three days of staring at lists of homonyms, the answer hit me at 5AM. Now I know how Sir Issac felt when struck by the apple.

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    1. I wonder if he removed the apple's skin, and found that and the ringing in his ears appealing?

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    3. No, but he got to the core of the problem. (You should have seed that one coming.)

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    4. Of corese he was, and he was Adamant in insisting it was Delicious Eve'n though she preferred figs. Sorry if that seems a bit serpentine, fang you very much.

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    5. You know what time of day Adam was created? A little before Eve. Enough about Eve. I hear about her every year - the day before Christmas.

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  37. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  38. World-class punnery this week, Blainesvillians! And some “fun” near-give-away kerfuffles, too. (But no Bob, alas!)

    I was too late to hop aboard the straw/hay discussion, way above, but this is a fun image from my old school.

    LegoIDoGoBackToMyOldSchool,However

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  39. Lego - always good to see Steely Dan. Though the lip sync styncked. You do know the origin of their name? You don't have to burrow far. Jan and SDB: try to control yourselves, don't get into a pickle.

    No one posted a guess on the alternate puzzle - too easy? too hard? too boring? too distracted? My pride cometh before the fall. One more time:

    Think of something in 4 letters. Add a letter and you get a homophone for something that first thing might be made of.

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    1. eco:

      All I want to say is that I am not understanding your post and am wondering if you are just gherkin us off.

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    2. eco,
      I was thinking of this when I posted my answer.

      LegoButIGuessIBlewIt!

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    3. SDB: not a chance.

      Lego: not a chants.

      A moment of noise for Yogi Berra, who could put us all to shame. I guess it's over.

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    4. While this may have been a chance encounter I will take my chances. However I prefer Chants d'Auvergne by Joseph Canteloube.

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  41. I have two legitimate word pairs, including the one I think Will has in mind. Anyone else?

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  42. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  43. Any hyphenated words? I'm not so sure they qualify as answers, but I really don't know.

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    1. One word is a hyphenated compound word.

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  44. I'm sure that there are several pairs. Mostly uncommon, however.

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