Sunday, April 09, 2017

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 9, 2017): Deep Dive Under the Sea

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 9, 2017): Deep Dive Under the Sea:
Q: Name a well-known U.S. city in two words. Replace each of these words with a word that rhymes with it, and you'll name a large sea creature in two words. What is it?
It's a brainstorm...

Edit: ... is an anagram of Manta birostris which is the Giant oceanic manta ray.
A: SANTA FE --> MANTA RAY

150 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. Congrats, Lego, on a fine puzzle. Thanks for posting last week, Berf and jan.

    We are roadtripping in El Reno, OK, at the moment, headed to state #49. Could not find NPR amidst the country and churchy stations. How many correct entries for Liam and Mila, Mali and Lima?

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    Replies
    1. "Over 1000" is all she said. (She seems to be saying that over and over lately.)

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    2. Thanks, jan. Yeah, over 1000 is close to a million, right?

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    3. WW: Colorado to Oklahoma seems like a really long way to go to Alaska?

      But you can listen to the puzzle on your computer or smartphone.

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    4. Thanks, eco, for the link. Much more pleasant than one more round of "All God's Biscuits." (actually business, but it took awhile.)

      Left windswept OK (which is truly OK). Odd moment when a coal train was passing in front of wind turbines and pumping gas wells (one flaring well also).

      We are in Arkansas, just one state away from my 49th. Alaska will be the last frontier. . .

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    5. We are back in Arkansas. That's my clue.

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  3. Client Bid, Nebraska, sounds like a great place to hold the most boring sales conference ever.

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  4. Good puzzle, Lego. If you remove a syllable from the name of the sea creature, you get a famous artist. ---Rob

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  5. New Vail, Utah, was founded my Mormons driven away from Vail, Colorado.

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  6. Mcy zluv'g zors, ssa'g ocws avlfl oys uc nwcshkhm owuhz howz klsr.

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  7. Small pox wiped out the entire Chickamauga population of Germ Trail, Tennessee.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  8. Oregonian Magazine recently declared Kale Park "Portland's Healthiest Suburb".

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  9. This creature’s relatives come in smaller sizes, too.

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  10. I think there's a bit of irony in this week's puzzle.

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  11. This is a neat puzzle, in an artsy sort of way.

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  12. How on earth did the puzzle's author know about my pet porpoise, Misty?

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  14. Did you see the correction for Moonstruck online?

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  15. My post earlier this morning at the end of last week's:

    skydiveboySun Apr 09, 05:47:00 AM PDT

    Rhymes with something Gorsuch will never do.

    Back to today:

    Took me only 9 minutes to solve, but not a bad puzzle. Congrats to Lego.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for your congrats, sdb. It means a lot to me.
      Regarding your clue: "Rhymes with something Gorsuch will never do," I came up with a multiple-word answer, the initial letters of which spell out a verb that Gorsuch likely would be willing to do.
      Am I anywhere in the ballpark?

      LegoWhoFumblesToFigureOutTheCluesEvenToHisOwnPuzzle!

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  16. I am just going to say, this city is not the same as most.

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  17. On Friday, when I got an email informing me that my puzzle would be used on NPR, I posted this:
    Here a cryptic couplet, that may come more into focus come April 9:
    "Yes I realize my puzzle's too easy...
    Not too hard on me I hope you'll please be!"
    I am thankful to you all for your congratulations and clever comments and clues regarding my puzzle. Yes, I realize this puzzle is a bit on the "easy" end of the "Mohs Mystery Scale of Puzzle Hardness." (A thank-you to Word Woman for teaching about the Mohs Scale... and, safe travels, WW. And thanks to eco for linking her (and perhaps others) to the Wisconsin NPR station).
    No, y'all have not been "too hard on me." Indeed, you've been very kind.
    Thanks, to Berf for the early posting, and to jan for the shout out on last week's blog. (Congrats to your wife, jan!... that's quicker than even skydiveboy solves these things!).
    I especially loved all the Blainesvillians' creative "piggyback" rhymes: sdb's "something Gorsuch will never do," Nick Missios' "pet porpoise, Misty" (see puzzle # SEVEN in my "Ripping Off Shortz And Collins Slices: R.I.M.E. in the U.S.A.," jsulbyrne's "Client Bid, NE," "NewVail, UT," "Germ Trail, TN" and "Kale Park, OR."
    Great clues: clotheslover's "Finding Nemo," Chuck's "relative sizes," Snipper's "irony," TomR's "this city is not the same as most," and and Rob's stupendous "famous artist" clue (echoed by Garry Rust?)
    Paul, as usual, I cannot decode your encryption (this is getting to be a "bit" between us!). I used my puzzle's answer as the keyword. No luck, just more gobbledegook! Still, I your puzzles are always worth decoding, so please help!
    Incidentally, we've got some pretty challenging puzzles on Puzzleria! this week, including a gem created by ron, Blainesvillian and Puzzlerian!

    LegoWhoPromisesThatHisNextNationalPublicRadioPuzzle(IfThereIsOne)WillBeSomewhatTougher

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  18. So does this mean if you post ripoff puzzles on this next week's Puzzleria!, there will be a conflict of interest because you'll be ripping off yourself? Or is this puzzle the start of a long list of other ideas you've had in the same vein? BTW I have solved your puzzle, so I'm not going to be cranky if I didn't get it right away, because I did. Good one, Lego! Well played!

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  19. Replies
    1. Are you saying he was a very old Sole?

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    2. No, but my clue revolves around some very old trivia.

      Delete

  20. I wonder if Kim Jong-un drives an SUV when going for a Sunday drive?

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    1. I thought maybe Kim Jong-un might drive a Hyundai Santa Fe while driving 'south of the border', on a Sunday drive. 

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  21. I am urchin you to consider that the sea creature was dressed to krill.

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  22. I am pretty sure that at least one of the thousand responses offered the girl's name "Amil," a totally legitimate answer that Shortz failed to mention.
    He did mention, along with a so-so alternate, that there were "a couple of other acceptable answers." If telling us what those were would somehow cause him a brain hemorrhage, then too bad, it is a chance I am willing to take.

    Working backward made a lot of sense on today's offering. I got it on third or fourth creature that came to mind.
    I think that maybe it falls somewhat short of a "challenge."
    Strike two for the "celebrity" guest.

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    Replies
    1. I did submit Amil, but I had it as a boy's name.

      Delete
    2. Sorry to hammer on this, but at least one thousand NPR listeners spent time trying to come up with answers to this puzzle.
      It would seem that Will Shortz approved at least four of these, but did not feel his followers deserved to know what they all were.
      I have to say that this behavior brings to mind someone else often discussed here.
      Tell me if this is not bothersome to you.

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    3. Will did not mention the girl's name ILMA either. AMIL is both a boy's name and a girl's name.

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    4. He didn't have time because it was more important to them that they have a celebrity guest I never heard of who took up some of the little time they have for the puzzle segment.

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    5. Nice try, SDB, but I'm not buying.

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    6. Mendo Jim:

      I think you may have misunderstood the meaning of my above post. It was intended to be sarcastic. I was not defending NPR or WS. I am in complete agreement with your original posts.

      Delete
  23. Replies
    1. Thank you,Chuck. Also Will-worthy,IMO, were the pair of puzzles you created that you graciously allowed us to post on Puzzleria!

      LegoWhoWelcomesGuestPuzzles

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  24. Strictly speaking, "the answer" to this puzzle is the name of the creature, rather than the city, right?
    With that in mind, here's a hint encrypted with my guess for "the answer" as keyword:

    ohnkiky

    And think triplets.

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    Replies
    1. Good observation, Paul. The puzzle draft I submitted asked for the city, but I'm pretty sure Will is asking for the creature... at least that's what I would type in were I eligible to submit an answer.

      Okay, I could decode "ohnkiky," and it is just possible I understand the hint... Are the triplets' initials A, T and S?

      LegoAboutToArriveWithHisVocalGroupTheDecryptOhnkickerFive

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    2. ATS is an appropriate triplet, but I had a couple other ones in mind; one of them is the monogram of a well known U.S. politician of the past.

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    3. I submitted both the city and the creature.

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    4. ATS = Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe

      Fe is Spanish for faith: faith hope & charity

      Santa says "ho, ho, ho" a lot, and that's the keyword for my first encrypted message ("ho" would also work, or "hoho", or " hohohohohoho", etc.).

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    5. And HHH is the monogram of Hubert Horatio Humphrey.
      And Santa is a charitable old soul, for goodness sake.
      I hope I've made myself clear.

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  25. As a rip on Lego's puzzle:

    Name a well-known U.S. township (or a smaller city with same name) in two words. Replace one of these words with a word that rhymes with it and the other with an anagram, and you'll name a large sea creature in two words. What is it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thomas Edison's Menlo Park, and
      lemon shark.

      Delete
  26. Two near misses:
    (1) EAGLE PASS (TX) to "LEGAL BASS" (as opposed to a small one -- the creature *was* said to be large). A large creature but a freshwater, not marine, one.

    (2) KEY WEST (FL) to "SEA CHEST". A large object and possibly marine (e.g in a shipwreck) but not a creature.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My creature's max weight is about 1/9th of Lego's.

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    2. A legal bass is what they sell at Legal Seafood, right?

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    3. hugh,
      How the heck did you find out how much I weigh?

      LegoSays"OK,hugh,HowOldAmI?"

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    4. ESP - I sensed that it would be a little more than the number of views on your link just now.

      I didn't want to write as POTUS speaks (he is also GRAMPUS) who repeats himself too often. So I didn't finish my remark with "Lego's creature's max weight."

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    5. Is that a WHALE GRAMPUS or the YALE CAMPUS?

      Delete
  27. Last week jan posted that he sent a negative comment re: the celebrity guest on air contestant and the response he received. I did the same and just now received the following response:

    APR 10, 2017 | 03:58PM EDT
    Kendra - NPR Audience & Community Relations replied:

    Dear Mark,

    Thank you for contacting NPR.We’re grateful for your feedback about the recent “Sunday Puzzle”:http://www.npr.org/2017/04/02/522357113/april-come-she-will-with-puzzles with guest Peter Sagal, and your note has been shared with the staff of Weekend Edition Sunday.

    In April and May, Weekend Edition Sunday is welcoming special celebrity puzzlers to join host Lulu Garcia-Navarro and Will Shortz for the puzzle segment each week. We’re excited about this new experiment. We’re also very interested in feedback from Sunday Puzzle fans like you. We hope you’ll keep listening and telling us what you think. We can assure you that your thoughts will be taken into consideration.

    Thanks for listening!
    Sincerely,
    Kendra
    NPR Audience & Community Relations

    I would suggest, if you do not like these celebrity guest interruptions, that you also send a negative comment. It is easy to do. You do it just as you would send your puzzle answer, except that you click on the top, left box that says Contact an NPR show or blog and go from there.

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    1. I got the exact same response at the exact same time - shocking!

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    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    3. Try this:

      blembcke@maralagoclub.com

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    4. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    5. https://www.whitehouse.gov/contact/write-or-call

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  28. If I were ever to start a dining establishment, I would choose this city.

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  29. Fortunately, to travel to this city,
    I will not have to go through Chicago's O'Hare airport! I would not want to have go, kicking & screaming.

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    1. Too bad the passengers in Chicago today didn't have a sense of history. With all the cell phone videos, a chant of "The whole world is watching" would have been appropriate.

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    2. I wonder if they will now drop their slogan, Fly the Friendly Skies, again.

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    3. I had that in the back of my mind as I posted it. That night, from watching on TV, will always be etched in my memory!!! How sad on both occasions...

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    4. SDB: How will they ever downplay this??
      Jan: What gives the police the right to do this?! You'd think if nothing else, who ever arrived at the gate last, should be out of luck.

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    5. Corporations rule in a plutocracy. That is how they win.

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    6. SDB - You are right about that!

      In my rage, I forgot to mention that UAL was making room for four flight crew members, not regular passengers. Still, this should be no excuse. This tells me UAL didn't offer enough money to bribe people to give up their seats!

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    7. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    8. He is Asian, so it must have been an easy choice for UAL. Had he been black he most likely would be at the morgue now. I am not saying cops are racist, but I certainly am not saying they aren't. I guess they didn't have any Muslim passengers. They were probably stopped at security check.

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    9. SDB - As a last resort, they should look for people wearing or even thinking of wearing leggings!!

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    10. Actually I was thinking of the "seek and you shall find" aphorism. Cops would interpret it as, look for a Sikh wearing a turban and grab his ass, he has no White Privileged.

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    11. That's good! Sad, but good!!

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    12. About 10 years ago, while I was on my merry way coming back home with my family on American Airlines, I was bumped from my flight. I was at the airport at least an hour early, too! This was way back when they were using the old electronic ticket types where you send it through a machine as it gets read and approved while a gate person oversees everything. Anway, everyone in the family had their ticket accepted while mine beeped with a red flashing light. The ticket person grabs it as it spits out of the machine, tears it in half, gives it back, and says with a Ted Cruz type smile, "sorry, you've been bumped!"
      I asked him what do I do now? He just said to wait over there and hope someone cancels. Heck, I bought my ticket a month earlier!!
      Fortunately, 3-4 people didn't show so some other people and myself made it back on.
      That sure made me mad, especially, when people were still arriving 5-10 minutes before takeoff time. Waaah!!

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    13. So ask yourself, do you REALLY love your country?

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    14. "We now have Red Eye and Black Eye flights available!"

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    15. United Airlines CEO: oscar.munoz@united.com.

      The original story got > 7700 comments on the WaPo site, more than almost anything I've seen. Today's follow-up got >5500 comments. Touched a nerve, I guess.

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  30. Losing your seat on United can be such a drag! Someone had to say it.

    Simple solution: have a reverse auction. Start the bidding high; many people would certainly volunteer at $5000, and then lower the amount until you only have 4 people left. Isn't that the free market capitalism method? Or does that not apply to them?

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  31. When is Trump going to build that wall?

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  32. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    1. Oh Blaine!!!!! Where are you?

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    2. Interesting.... I didn't know what the fuss was about, because the answer my wife provided involved a different state, and turns out to have been somewhat invalid (same sea creature, though).

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    3. Guess we need some of DT's security guards.

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  33. I rarely hear the puzzle on radio (vs. reading it later), but was very pleased to hear and recognize the submitter this week. Congrats, Joe, and bravo on a fine puzzle!

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    1. Thanks, mike_h. That makes my day.

      LegoWhoLivesForAnyBravosHeCanGet

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  34. Change the vowels of the creature to get another well known US city.

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    1. Change the consonants of the creature to get a well known World Heritage site.

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  35. I daresay Dorothy Mengering is alive in nearly every heart in America and beyond.

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  36. Santa Fe > Manta Ray

    My hint:

    “Rhymes with something Gorsuch will never do.” He would never grant a stay.

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  37. Santa Fe, Manta Ray

    Last Sunday I said, “This creature’s relatives come in smaller sizes, too.” Such as the stingray.

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  38. My clue referencing the puzzle being artsy, was for Santa Fe, considered an artist haven area.

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  39. I submitted Overland Park/sand shark and Santa Fe/manta ray

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  40. SANTA FE and MANTA RAY

    My clue about being in the Natural State was to FAYetteville, Arkansas. We are in northwest Arkansas exploring the grounds, architecture and art at
    Crystal Bridges
    (wow,
    our second day here
    ) and the U of Arkansas.

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    Replies
    1. I highly recommend a side trip to the Thorncrown Chapel, about an hour from Crystal Springs. It is always listed in the top 10 of buildings in the US, though architects have their own tastes. E. Fay Jones, the architect, was a student of Frank Lloyd Wright's.

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    2. I like the building, but tell me about the influence of Windex® in its design.

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    3. Same influence as your Seattle Public Library.

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    4. Yes, perhaps, but ours is a cool house.

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    5. Rats, eco. We came the long winding way through Eureka Springs from Mountain Home and saw nary a chapel. Next trip. We will be back.

      Frank Lloyd Wright seems a bit full of himself; I have thought this before on other tours of his buildings. In the tour of the home here (originally built in NJ and reassembled here), the tour guide spoke of FLW being the one to elevate women's work in the kitchen to "work status" by calling the kitchen a "work station." And, now, voila, thanks to FLW's ego, men could cook, too, because it was "work" eco, I'd enjoy your views on FLW, the man.

      I also did not like the very narrow entryway into the guest room. He was asked by the owners to make it wider and simply said "no."

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    6. Yes SDB, but REM never kept up with the Jones'.

      WW: a full vetting of FLW would take a lot. He was brilliant, and an egotistical bastard. Hard to completely judge him for his views on women, he was a man of his times. But his first employee was a woman, Marion Mahoney, one of the first women architects in the US, who drew the incredible renderings of his early Prairie Houses. In his early days he employed 5 men and 2 women, a very progressive ratio 115 years ago.

      Wright was also very small, I think 5'-4" or so, and he thought anyone over 6' shouldn't live, or something like that. His narrow door was influenced by Japanese architecture (small people except for sumo wrestlers), and FLW copied their use of narrow openings to make spaces feel larger. He was very set in his ways, and would rarely accommodate his client's requests for pragmatic things that didn't fit with his beliefs.

      I've known two people with a strong connection to Wright: Edgar Kaufman Jr was the son of the client for the magnificent Fallingwater house, and he became an architectural historian. He told me Wright had a brilliant mind, could see things very quickly, but was quick to take credit for things. Another friend was in Wright's studio in the 1950's, similar views. Both had tremendous admiration.

      I've read there are less complimentary things to say about how he treated his family. Early photos show him very distant from his children, and of course he famously left his first wife and eloped with the wife half of a client, a big scandal in 1910.

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    7. Now, which of the Wright Brothers are we talking about? And where did they go wrong?

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    8. eco, thanks for your insights on FLW. Very helpful.

      I, and others 6 feet tall and taller on our tour, were so happy to get back outside.

      Also, seeing the lines on the 4' by 4' floor tiles matching up with the lines on the couch partitions and lines on the bookshelf made me want to move one of those footstools at an angle.

      He also wanted everyone to know he made up "carport." It's not the legacy I would choose.



      Delete
    9. Really? I love Port, and don't mind drinking it in the car at all.

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    10. FLW's drawings included instructions that exposed screw heads had to be turned so they were perfectly horizontal.

      And there's a story that one client had placed rocks painted white on both sides of their dark driveway so they wouldn't drive off the edge. When Wright saw this he got out of his car and kicked the rocks into the ditches.

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  41. SANTA FE, New Mexico>>>MANTA RAY.

    The “largest living sea creatures” website came in handy... see number 06.


    Removing the syllable “ta” from “Manta Ray” leaves the artist MAN RAY.

    Jan's wife's answer: TAMPA BAY, Florida?

    Changing the vowels yields MONTEREY, California.

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    Replies
    1. Yep. My "devil of a time " comment referred to the former name of their ball team.

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  42. SANTA FE, MANTA RAY
    Again, congratulations Legolambda. Great puzzle.

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  43. My clue referenced some irony in the puzzle- irony as in Fe, the symbol for iron. (And the end of Santa Fe).

    ReplyDelete
  44. Joseph/Lego:
    Not a bad puzzle in my estimation. Perhaps I was just lucky to get it quickly.
    Would you say you have offered Dr. Shortz better ones?
    Does anyone else feel that they have?

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    Replies
    1. Mendo Jim:

      Lego and I, in the past, have discussed how difficult it is to get any quality puzzle accepted by WS for their NPR Sunday Puzzle. This is meant in no way to denigrate his puzzle which is one, I have no doubt, he felt was simple enough for acceptance. I have submitted numerous, easy to understand, sophisticated puzzles with no results. You can easily see for yourself by looking at some of them Lego has used in the past on his Puzzleria!

      I like to make up puzzles with geographical or historical interest, but for some reason, never explained, they are not accepted. Because of Lego's puzzle I have submitted a ripoff I coined requiring geographical and world knowledge awareness, but I know it will not be aired due to the thin skinned personality of WS.

      Good question by the way.

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    2. Thanks, Mendo Jim... I'll take "not bad" any day.
      I have indeed submitted other puzzles to Will Shortz. Some I thought were quite worthy of broadcast. But most have been politely turned down, often with helpful explanations why. A few are in "limbo" -- in Will's "perhaps" file. But most have been rejected on the grounds of being too derivative, too easy, too tough or too wordy/complicated -- not passing Will's "listening to the puzzle at the breakfast table without needing to write anything down" test.

      As is often apparent on Blainesvillians' comments on this blog, there can be honest disagreements about whether a puzzle is superb or lousy. I loved the 3W's puzzle and upside-down digital clock puzzles on NPR, for example, while others loathed them. "Elegance" and "fairness" are often in the eye of the besolver. WS is, in my experience is hard-working, generous, and (perhaps) a perfectionist who has spent much of his life contemplating and studying what makes a great puzzle. I think he knows his stuff.

      I concur with skydiveboy about the value of puzzles of geographical or historical interest, and he has created several brilliant and sophisticated puzzles, many which he was generous enough to let me post on Puzzleria! (His "all thumbs" poker puzzle is truly ingenious.)

      And thanks, MJ; it is a good question.

      LegoAmateurPuzzleMonster




      Delete
  45. I suspect that United passenger was more familiar with their carry on rules than he was with their carry off policies. Anyway it really is a drag when something like that happens. I bet the United employee who took his seat felt relaxed and comfortable in that seat during the flight too.

    "This is your captain speaking. I am very sorry for the disruption and just to make things right I am ordering double rations of Dry Roasted Peanuts all around. Welcome to the friendly skies and enjoy your flight."

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. SDB: I bet it was very uncomfortable sitting in that guy's seat! I wonder if the passengers gave him or her a lot of grief during that flight??
      Also, did anyone hear what jobs those United employees had that were so important? I haven't heard if they were pilots or just had to get to a WWF match.

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    3. Did they check his suit case? I'm sure his lawyer did.

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  46. How do you raise a cross between a manta ray and a '68 Charger? Check out the acrostic in Sunday's New York Times (or online now).

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    Replies
    1. Jan: I'll have to wait until Sunday, I am curious, though!

      Delete
  47. Once again, Thursday has come and gone before I remembered to post. So, a day late...
    U.S. city – Santa Fe; sea creature Manta Ray.

    My musical clue, “Nat King Cole”, was based on:
    Manta Rays are similar to sting rays.
    A Corvette Stingray was featured on the TV show Route 66.
    Santa Fe is on Route 66.
    In 1946, Nat King Cole recorded his classic You Get Your Kicks on Route 66.
    You can hear it here.. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dCYApJtsyd0

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  48. On a lighter 'aviation' note, April 18th is the 75th anniversary of the "Doolittle Raid". A remembrance is being held at the Air Force Museum at Wright Patterson AFB near Dayton, Ohio.
    Several B-25's are flying there from around the country and one of them stopped over at an airport by me this morning. I hope to see it before it takes off!

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    1. The raid was so named because it do little damage to the Japanese military?

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    2. jan, if you recall, senators Doolittle and Kefauver (Keepoffer) were in charge of legislation regarding reproduction laws at the time.

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    3. It was fun going to see that B-25 today. It was in excellent shape and sounded great!
      While that Doolittle raid didn't do that much damage, it made the Japanese change tactics, leading to the Battle Of Midway, with the USA ultimately gaining the upper hand.

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    4. 68Charger, jan and sdb,
      You might want to check out the "Great American Hero: Hero Worship" puzzle on this Puzzleria!

      LegoThinksDoolittleDidLotsO'Good

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    5. 68Charger, did you get to go inside the B-25? If so, I imagine you'd be impressed by how small it is inside, given the lengths of the missions it flew. I once got a tour of a B-24, a much longer-range bomber, and was amazed by how narrow the bomb bay catwalk was -- it seemed like about a 6-inch wide aluminum trough.

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    6. Lego: That was a nice and tricky little puzzle! I did not get the answer right away and peeked at the answer. Good one!!

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    7. Jan: I did not walk through it but I was able to look through the rear, lower hatch and it was very cramped looking!
      A few years ago a B-17 flew in to the same airport as today and I was able to walk around inside it. I tried walking through the bombay area to try and get a feel of what it would be like to try and escape in an emergency. I'm afraid that if the bomb bay doors were not already open, I would be history. I don't see how those crew members could maneuver around to bail out unless the hatch was right there! I pictured myself with a parachute strapped on and there was no way I'd make it out. Even the pilots would have had a devil of a time.
      About 15-20 years ago I was in a B-25 club and took a flight, as a passenger, around south Kansas City. That was a fantastic experience. We were able to swoop and dive, bank and climb with ease. Nothing crazy, just a graceful 30-40 minute sightseeing trip!

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  49. Day late posting again! Santa Fe/Manta Ray. The Manta Ray "sea teacher" in Finding Nemo is aptly named Ray.

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  50. Thanks, 68Charger, for the Jimmy Doolittle P! puzzle shout-out.
    Hugh's clever rip on my puzle (answer: negaprion brevirostris) completely stumped me!
    Loved SuperZee's "Route 66" hint, but it went over my head... great NKC song though!
    Blaine's clue was solid, as usual, but it stumped me also.
    Thanks again to all!

    This week's Puzzleria! was posted Friday Morning, as usual. As cranberry predicted in a Sunday afternoon comment, I am ripping myself off ... six times over, with six "Ripping-Off-Young" piggyback puzzles.
    In a seventh puzzle, the answer involves Will Shortz.
    An eighth Dessert puzzle might be lip-smacking.... or maybe not.
    And our ninthand tenth puzzles are fresh-off-the-presses newsy.

    LegoNotesThat Blaine'sPUZZLE LINKS LinkToPuzzleria!

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  51. Jan: Watching the news today, I keep seeing the giraffe story and keep thinking of your post from last week!

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  52. Next week's challenge: A spoonerism is when you change the initial consonant sounds of two words in a phrase to get a new phrase. For example, "Tames Jailer" is a spoonerism of the singer James Taylor. "Spark Mitts" is a spoonerism of the swimmer Mark Spitz. The name of what famous entertainer — first and last names — has a two-word spoonerism meaning "A runny variety of cheese"?

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  53. 1400 correct entries this week.

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  54. Solved this one - quickly and easily.

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