Thursday, April 21, 2011

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 17, 2011): Sports Venue Transforms into Sport Equipment

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 17, 2011): Sports Venue Transforms into Sport Equipment:
Q: Think of a nine-letter word naming a venue for certain sports. Three letters in the word are repeated. Remove all the repetitions, and the remaining six letters can be rearranged to name a piece of sports equipment. What are these two words?
I might have to pray to a Norse god for assistance on this.

Edit: The hint pointed to Odin, the Norse god. O is an oval shape, like a racetrack, while din is a synonym for racket.
A: Racetrack (remove the duplicated letters r,a,c and rearrange) --> Racket

49 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via Google or Bing) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  2. By the way, did anyone else initially get misled by the wording of the puzzle? I won't say anything more, but if you are struggling, rethink what the question is asking.

    ReplyDelete
  3. The Queen said, Tom, thanks for the tune
    But now you must be still, son.
    For if you do not sleep you’ll risk
    The ire of young Prince Wilson.”

    Tom’s heart it sank, it did indeed
    As he whimpered to his ma,
    “I’m tired of Wilson trumping me.
    There ought to be a law.”

    “Don’t speak in haste,” the Queen replied,
    “For I have often found
    That when you let your temper run
    Your head spins round and round.”

    “My brother should be cast away,”
    Tom said then fell to sleep
    And dreamed about the Sport of Kings.
    No need for counting sheep.

    ReplyDelete
  4. If I'm thinking correctly, I believe there are two different spellings on one of the words. Sound right Blaine?

    ReplyDelete
  5. Might I suggest we don't pile on Will Shortz for his confusion this morning?

    ReplyDelete
  6. Will certainly was confused this morning!

    He must have received lots of comments about mass vs. weight, but then thought that an Angstrom is a unit of mass as well! LOL!

    As for this new Puzzle, let's keep that down to a dull roar!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Inspired by the kingly hint above, I really wanted this to be a "polo pitch", leading me to wonder if "colt hip" can be considered equipment.

    Strangely, this lead me to the correct answer...

    ReplyDelete
  8. Yes, two spellings for one of the words, phredp. One works, the other doesn’t.

    Chuck

    P.S. How much does an angstrom weigh?

    ReplyDelete
  9. As soon as I read the new puzzle (yesterday) it raised concerns because I am not into the common sports stuff, but I will hold my tongue.

    Is ophthalmology a contact sport?

    ReplyDelete
  10. Since helmets were mandated in 2003 for Tiddly Wink tournaments head injuries have neither risen nor declined.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Musical hint this week might be from old song lyrics from The Band. And not "The Weight"...that was last week.

    ReplyDelete
  12. phredp, nice hint. The Band is one of my favorite groups of all time.

    "Who are your favorite movie characters?" I asked my friend.

    "Scarlett and Rhett," he responded.

    ReplyDelete
  13. The wording did cause me to go back to school for a while, then I realized it wasn't some kind of scheme from MIT...

    ReplyDelete
  14. I spent hours last night poring over a list of over 1,200 nine-letter words with triplet letters before I realized this morning I was way off course. I'm pretty confident I have the key now.

    And it's interesting to note that what I wound up throwing away was *also* a piece of sports equipment, and was in quite usable condition for this puzzle.

    For my musical clue I'll use the Beach Boys.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I was also hobbled by the same misunderstanding referred to up top by Blaine. But after playing with BALLFIELD for five minutes, I realized what they were seeking and the answer (had surely come).

    I also love THE BAND, obviously, and would suggest ACROSS THE GREAT DIVIDE also works for Angstrom, from the same album.

    -- Other Ben

    ReplyDelete
  16. phredp –

    I know the song and have the album. But how about going back 100+ years before that to Stephen Foster?

    Chuck

    ReplyDelete
  17. Was totally wracking my brain on this one as I had some 9 letter venues but none worked. So, I said forget it, all bets off, until I re-read Blaine's incredibly helpful comment about paying attention to the wording. Huge help. Hopefully, if you don't have it, there are some clues in this post...

    ReplyDelete
  18. Janeabelle, thanks, I was preakin out over this til you make me go back to my first (of three) thought and read the hint more carefully. I should know better since I live around the corner from a major venue.

    ReplyDelete
  19. She is not my lover. Be cautious son, for she has a checkered past.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Roro,
    Thanks--and GREAT clue in your post!

    ReplyDelete
  21. still not getting need a little help :(

    ReplyDelete
  22. Emmanuel, did you see the movie "Castaway"?

    ReplyDelete
  23. Yes I with Tom Hanks and Helen Hunt

    ReplyDelete
  24. Another movie clue " My Dinner with Andre"

    ReplyDelete
  25. Name a movie in which an actor from "My Dinner With Andre" and an actor from "Cast Away" both appear.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Emmanuel, a lot of the clues point to the venue, rather than the piece of sports equipment.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Another phrasing of essentially the same puzzle:
    Think of a nine-letter word naming a venue for certain sports. Three letters in the word are repeated. Rearrange these 3 letters to name a piece of sports equipment used at the venue. Remove those 3 letters from the original word and rearrange to name something produced by that piece of sports equipment at that venue. What are the 3 words?

    ReplyDelete
  28. This was too easy, like a walk over to the neighbors house. No poetry from me, looking forward to Saturday.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Try changing one letter in the nine-letter venue and scrambling to land a role in a production involving a common sport played in an uncommon venue.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Worked on this with the family. We guessed the equipment from clues given here ,but rejected the obvious venue by not understanding the question. There'll be lots of moans and groans.

    ReplyDelete
  31. In my first post here I used the word RAISED and the term HOLD MY TONGUE as a hint for RAISING A RACKET.

    ReplyDelete
  32. When I first read the puzzle, I assumed that they were looking for answer where you were supposed to remove a single letter that was repeated 3 times (e.g. baLLfieLd).

    ReplyDelete
  33. Interesting. I was unsure what you all were complaining about because it was unclear to me. I did not have this confusion. I had my own confusion with the puzzle. I was not sure if they wanted a proper name or a generic name for the venue. Astrodome vs. ballfield.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Yeah SDB, I had same confusion cuz I thought why not say 9 letter word that "means" or "is" rather than "naming". Threw me off for a bit. Blaine, I thought your clue had to do with Thor's hammer. There is some racket named the hypo hammer or something like that. Any way my clue had to do with Preakness here in Maryland,which actually is one of three (maybe Belmont Stakes is actually first). I live 3 blocks away and usually try to leave the area if I am not attending. Police always block off my street and threaten to arrest me if I go the wrong way after they decide my street is suddenly one way.

    ReplyDelete
  35. I suggested we didn't pile on (pylon) Will.

    ReplyDelete
  36. @TB, as in pylon --> traffic cone --> car --> racing --> racetrack?

    ReplyDelete
  37. "As for this new Puzzle, let's keep that down to a dull roar!"

    Classic reaction to a "racket".

    ReplyDelete
  38. Racket is a dialect of Lisp and a descendant of Scheme, invented at MIT - how's that for an obscure unsporting reference !

    ReplyDelete
  39. DaveJ:
    Somewhat obscure; unsporting, perhaps. Actually informative...definitely!

    ReplyDelete
  40. @Blaine, that's what I was going for, though the exact meaning is:

    py·lon   
    [pahy-lon] Show IPA
    –noun
    1. a marking post or tower for guiding aviators, frequently used in races.

    ReplyDelete
  41. Wallace Shawn had dinner with André Gregory.
    Helen Hunt was an actor in "Cast Away", and, if she prefers the term "actress", I apologize.
    "Castaway" was an entirely different movie.
    Wally and Helen both appeared in "The Curse of the Jade Scorpion", in which two geographical names figure prominently.
    The last syllable of one of these "place names" coincides exactly with the "piece of sports equipment" in jan's really elegant paraphrase/amplification of the NPR puzzle, while the first syllable of the other "place name" is virtually synonomous with "racket", in the "sinister" sense.

    "Con" can refer to "convict"; and "Caretaker" is a character (who happens to be a convict) once portrayed by James (or Jim) Hampton.
    I didn't see the 1995 version with Chris Rock in a similarly named role.
    CARETAKER is also a word in which one letter can be changed, and the resulting letters can be rearranged to form RACETRACK.
    If I recall correctly, Mr. Hampton also did a commercial or two for a certain poultry product (i.e."?").

    ReplyDelete
  42. Haven't. I "haven't seen the 1995 version"....maybe I'll sleep now.

    ReplyDelete
  43. Actually, 2005, not 1995, is the correct year for the remake of "The Longest Yard". Is the "decade" a unit of proofreading?

    ReplyDelete
  44. New puzzle is up. I wonder if it has anything to do with to 2012 elections?

    ReplyDelete
  45. Another super easy one. I already sent in my answer. This one almost put me to sleep.

    ReplyDelete
  46. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  47. I really wanted to make "Colosseum" work in such a way that "muscle" was the sports equipment. Damn that O!

    ReplyDelete