Sunday, February 18, 2018

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 18, 2018): Hot Spots Not to be Forgot

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 18, 2018): Hot Spots Not to be Forgot:
PRIOR WEBSITE PUZZLE:
Q: An easy-sounding challenge this week that turns out to be not so easy: Two major U.S. cities, each with two-word names, each have an unusual property: The last two letters of the first word in the name are the same as the last two letters of the second word in the name — like University City, in Missouri, in which both "university" and "city" end in "-ty." But both cities in my answer are much larger. According to the 2010 U.S. census, each city has more than a quarter-million people. What cities are they?
Don't miss any of the bright spots in the photo here (courtesy of NASA). If you think Mr. Shortz made a mistake in the population count, he did not.

Update: The puzzle above is apparently *not* the puzzle that was presented on air. Here's the one that was presented on-air and has now been corrected on the website.
ON-AIR PUZZLE:
Q: Take the start of the name of a country and the end of that country's capital. Put the parts together, one after the other, and you'll get the last name of a character in a very popular movie. It's a character everyone knows. Who is it?
This one's easier and less controversial. I'm guessing it was inspired by another recent puzzle.

Sunday, February 11, 2018

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 11, 2018): Put Your Back Into It

Sunday Puzzle (Feb 11, 2018): Put Your Back Into It:
Q: Name part of the human body in six letters. Add an R and rearrange the result to name a part of the body in seven letters. What are they?
I went through three ENTIRE lists until I figured out the answer.

Edit: The first *3* letters of ENTIRE are ENT (Ear, Nose and Throat)
A: Tonsil and Nostril

Sunday, February 04, 2018

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 4, 2018): Getting Short with You

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 4, 2018): Getting Short with You:
Q: In English, a short "u" sound is usually spelled with a "u," as in "fun" and "luck." Occasionally it's spelled with an "o," as in "come" and "love." Can you name two everyday one-syllable words in which a short "u" sound is spelled with an "a"?
I used to wear corduroy pants.

Edit: What was I thinking?
A: WHAT, WAS