Thursday, October 22, 2009

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Oct 18): Bonnie Raitt Anagram

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Oct 18): Bonnie Raitt Anagram:
Q: Take the name of the singer Bonnie Raitt, rearrange these 11 letters to be two words that are loosely synonyms. What are they?
Hope I have the right answer; it relies on the words being loosely related since I wouldn't say they are direct synonyms.

Edit: It's after the deadline so I think it is okay to reveal my hint. It was Hope+I = Hopi, as in the Native American Tribe/Nation. There were others I considered using like Oneida, Cherokee, etc.
A: BONNIE RAITT --> TRIBE, NATION

30 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any outright spoilers before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here. Thank you.

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  2. The answer is NOT "Titian Boner"!

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  3. I agree with Blaine. I think the words are related more as set and subset. I also believe that by not too much of a stretch 2 answers are possible. One answer (Blaine's) is associated with large knifes. The other answer is associated with an alum of a well known school.

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  4. Seems to me in this wonderful country of ours, we should have the collective knowledge to solve this one, but I'm pretty sure the answer is NOT Baritone Nit.

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  5. Early American history deals often with my two words as synonyms--not even "loosely."

    Answer submitted to NPR. "Over three thousand" for last week.

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  6. Being from Belton, Missouri, I'll drink to that...or so she said (not)!

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  7. Geri,
    I think we have the same two-word answer. There might be other sets of words that are synonyms, but ours fit the clue in the puzzle very well.
    However, your comment may have given away too much. Blaine must be napping.

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  8. Looks like a lot of us are using the same website to get the answer.

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  9. I think my favorite anagram of her name had to have been "bonier taint" ... it just made me giggle a little. :)

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  10. Geri's remarks about early American history are correct. In at least one case the usage still continues even though MWCD calls the usage archaic. My "large knifes" clue refers to 3 examples of the 5 Geri may have in mind.

    My off-the-wall suggestion "alum of a well known school" goes to show that two possible answers to a hint does not make them synonyms.
    "Etonian, Brit"

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  11. Geri, Turns out "early American history" and "archaic" aren't strictly true. Usage of the past continues. I'm a little slow - Internet access at the library has been down for a few days.

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  12. My hint was Inca. It was obscure, I admit.

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  13. I got the same answer (Tribe/Nation) but didn't submit because it didn't seem right. I should have listened to someone's clue that said one was a subset of the other............

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  14. I think that "tribe" and "nation" were used as synonyms, not as a "subset"--one of the other.

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  15. My hint about Belton Missouri and "drinking to that" referred to Carrie Nation

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  16. I don't see any way to give clues to this new puzzle, just write out the names and start scanning.

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  17. Geri, my rejection of MWCD's classification of one usage of "nation" as archiac was also meant to indicate a retreat from the set/subset idea.

    Mike, I ran into some new (to me) text messaging shortcuts:
    GTK, OBU, and RRR:
    Good To Know
    Okay By You?
    haR, haR, haR (IMHO BT LOL)

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  18. would anyone like to write out the puzzle and post it please...it is not on the NPR web site as of 5:00PM EST and Blaine has not posted it.
    Thanks

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  19. Incomplete paraphrase:
    Take the names
    Leonardo Da Vinci,
    Frank Sinatra,
    Steven Douglas.
    Each name conceals the name of a world capital in left to right order, although not with consecutive letters. Name the capitals.

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  20. I think it's "Stephen" Douglas, not "Steven" (although it doesn't affect the answer).

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  21. Here it is at 7:45 EDT, and NPR hasn't posted this week's puzzle online. I've gone ahead and submitted my answer through the link for last week's puzzle.

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  22. I did find it on line by going in on NPR ... Weekend Edition Sunday ... etc. The bookmark I had was not showing it. At any rate, here is the full text:

    Take the name "Boris Karloff." It contains the letters of "Oslo" in left-to-right order (although not consecutively). Now write down these three names: Leonardo da Vinci, Frank Sinatra, Steven Douglas. Each conceals the name of another world capital in left-to-right order, although not in consecutive letters. What capitals are these?

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  23. I've been waiting for everyone to wake up. I listened to KPCC from Pasadena, California, at
    5:30 am pacific time. Lianne said, "I'll tell you a lot of our listeners loved this one. We got over forty-seven humdred answers this week. That's a lot."

    Have we hit a new high in number of answers?
    I think we'll top it this week. We've hit a new "high"--"low" om EASY puzzles. Only Stephen Douglas gave me a bit of pause. The other two are incredibly easy.

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  24. To get to the puzzle you need to go to Search Sunday Puzzle (right side of screen) on last week's puzzle page and write: Puzzle October 25, 2009. Then it comes up.
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4473090

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