Thursday, May 22, 2014

NPR Sunday Puzzle (May 18, 2014): The Cure for What Ails You

Finding The Answers Within : NPR:
Q: Name a famous actress of the past whose last name has two syllables. Reverse the syllables phonetically. The result will name an ailment. What is it?
I think Will suffers from memory loss, because we have had this puzzle in the last few years.

Edit: The puzzle was previously aired in 2009.
A: Sarah Bernhardt --> Heartburn

77 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My wife claims my posting was too obvious, so it's gone.

      A current comic would work, too.

      Did Ned or Warren have TB?

      Could an actress with BO win an Obie?

      Delete
    2. Good call, jan.

      Yea, an illin' chillin' puzzle for sure:

      http://theboombox.com/julieanne-smolinski-will-shortz-crossword-puzzle-illin/

      I would have phrased the puzzle as actor or actress to give us a little challenge...or given a fresh new puzzle for a true challenge.

      No ill Will though.

      Delete
    3. jan,
      How Shakespearian of you.
      TB or not TB? That is the question.

      Delete
  3. Star of stage and screen, she shares the same first name with my daughter.

    Chuck

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  4. I posted the following at the end of our last week's challenge:

    I was expecting a puzzle. Oh well.

    The reason you don't see this actress any more is that it is just too difficult getting her to re-hearse.

    Now I realize that this puzzle was used before too.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Other versions:

    Name a famous actor/ actress whose last name has two syllables. Reverse the syllables phonetically. The result will name an historic empire. What is it?

    Do the same and get a body part.

    Or do the same thing and get a common answer to questioning 3 year olds.

    Or, name a famous actor/ actress of the past whose last name has two syllables. Remove the last letter and then reverse the syllables phonetically. The result will name another actor/ actress. What is it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Four nice puzzles. ecoarchitect!

      Four possibly nice answers (without giving your answers away, I hope):
      1. Jean 2. Leon 3. Henry 4. DeForest
      Lego(?)Lambda

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    2. Different names than I have, have to compare notes Thursday.

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    3. I got #1 and #3, and lego's hint for #1.

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    4. I have all 4. Will post Thursday.

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    5. I get lego's clues now. True for my answers to #1, 3 & 4 (though one is spelled differently), and my #2 doesn't match, but there are lots of body parts and perhaps lots of answers. We'll see on Thursday.

      Delete
    6. I liked the manor/Norma connection in #1; and #3, in conjunction with some other events of the week, had me returning to the second side of Abbey Road (as do a lot of things, I'll admit).

      Delete
  6. My Dad was a toddler when she died!

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  7. Back to the hot turkey sandwich, eh sbd?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. To some a hot turkey sandwich would be heartburn city

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  8. Her first name wasn't her real first name, anyway.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Leo, pesky "H," first and last. . .

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  10. WW,

    She was born with a different name.

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    Replies
    1. Leo, and an "H" figured into her original first name and was added to her last name as well.

      Word H. Woman

      Delete
    2. And she did it just for the "H" of it.

      Delete
    3. Yikes! Only added to her last name though. Confused her original first name with another actress.

      Delete
  11. "Died ____ _____ or eaugd er pubzundeasm er e ______," neosmy dim herrmlkmn.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "That darn berth is about as comfortable as a coffin," railed the passenger.

      Delete
  12. What a feeble puzzle. There's no way there won't be a lot of people getting this one.

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    Replies
    1. How will we ever get a leg up on the puzzle competition with this one, David?

      Delete
  13. She was known for her rather odd sleeping habit's.

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    Replies
    1. I believe that would be Mother Theresa.

      Delete
    2. But Mother Teresa needs a subtracted H, not an added one ;-).

      Picky, picky, picky.

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    3. My bad! I forgot they got the H out of her long ago.

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    4. But not you, skydhiveboy...;-)

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    5. A little bad will do quite nicely, sdb.

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    6. No worries; I'm not in the habit of behaving myself. In fact I'm not in the habit.

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    7. I think you are in a habit or two or three, sdb. Just a matter of sorting them out.

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    8. It very well could be, however I have never been caught in the habit, yet, anyway. I try to make it a habit not to get caught in the habit. And that's the truth. Now you habit it.

      Delete
    9. Of course, Paul, if you must wear a habit, get a habit forming one. Unless, of course, obesity is a problem, then it would be best to break the habit.

      Delete
    10. Fine, sdb, habit your way, for the time being.

      Delete
    11. However you want to cloak it, Paul.

      Delete
  14. The Mensa Invitational Winners. These are especially for SDB & WW and all punmasters...

    The Washington Post's Mensa Invitational once again invited readers to take any word from the dictionary, alter it by adding, subtracting, or changing one letter, and supply a new definition.


    Here are the winners:

    1. Cashtration (n.): The act of buying a house, which renders the subject financially impotent for an indefinite period of time.




    2. Ignoranus: A person who's both stupid and an asshole.

    3. Intaxicaton: Euphoria at getting a tax refund, which lasts until you realize it was your money to start with.

    4. Reintarnation: Coming back to life as a hillbilly.

    5. Bozone (n.): The substance surrounding stupid people that stops bright ideas from penetrating. The bozone layer, unfortunately, shows little sign of breaking down in the near future.

    6. Foreploy: Any misrepresentation about yourself for the purpose of getting laid

    7. Giraffiti: Vandalism spray-painted very, very high.

    8. Sarchasm: The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it.

    9. Inoculatte: To take coffee intravenously when you are running late.

    10. Osteopornosis: A degenerate disease.
    (This one got extra credit.)

    11. Karmageddon: It's like, when everybody is sending off all these really bad vibes, right? And then, like, the Earth explodes and it's like, a serious bummer.

    12. Decafalon (n): The grueling event of getting through the day consuming only things that are good for you.

    13. Glibido: All talk and no action.

    14. Dopeler Effect: The tendency of stupid ideas to seem smarter when they come at you rapidly.

    15. Arachnoleptic Fit (n.): The frantic dance performed just after you've accidentally walked through a spider web.

    16. Beelzebug (n.): Satan in the form of a mosquito, that gets into your bedroom at three in the morning and
    cannot be cast out.

    17. Caterpallor (n.): The color you turn after finding half a worm in the fruit you're eating.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ron,
      Those are great! I recall reading a few of them before.
      Shouldn't #9. Inoculatte: To take coffee intravenously when you are running late. Actually be: Inoculatte: To take coffee intravenously when you are running latte?.

      Delete
    2. Thanks, ron. I enjoyed these.

      I encounter sarchasm on a daily basis.

      Sometimes on this very blog.

      Delete
    3. No! Not here, WW. surely not.

      Delete
  15. Starcasm: brilliant banter as in "Blainesville is replete with starcasm."

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    Replies
    1. Sparchasm: When a rift opens during a disagreement.

      Scarcasm: leftover wounds from a sparchasm.

      Delete
    2. "Darling, I've missed you!" she said
      as she fired the gun a second time.

      Delete
  16. Replies
    1. Sharkasm: marine animal's open mouth.

      Delete
  17. Tsarcasm: Putin' in a good word for the head of Russia.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Carcasm: that sinkhole that swallowed the National Corvette Museum back in February.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Sargasm: reaching the climax of this thread.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. SARAH BERNHARDT>>>HEARTBURN

      "Illin chillin'" referred to feeling ill after eating chili and getting heartburn. It also referred to a transplant heart on ice getting freezer burn.


      "Getting a leg up on the puzzle competition" was a reference to Ms. Bernhardt's losing a leg.

      ron, I did not miss out on your relevant sarcasm.

      Delete
  20. Sarah Barnyard > Heartburn

    My Hint:

    "She was known for her rather odd sleeping habit's."

    Sarah Bernhardt was an actress who purchased and slept in a coffin.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Sarah Bernhardt, heartburn

    Last Sunday I said, “Star of stage and screen, she shares the same first name with my daughter.” My daughter’s given name is Sara.

    Chuck

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    Replies
    1. Chuck, your daughter is in good company. There were 12 Sarahs/Saras at the weekend commencement I attended.

      Delete
  22. The Divine Sarah BERNHARDT

    The ailment: HEARTBURN

    The SAME CHALLENGE was aired previously, January 4, 2009, and the ANSWER was revealed a week later.

    Ecoarchitect's challenges:

    1. Marilyn MONROE = Historic Empire: ROMAN Empire.
    2. Audie MURPHY = Body part: FEMUR.
    3. Bill COSBY = answer to 3 year olds' “Why?” BECAUSE.
    4. Humphrey BOGART, remove the T = Greta GARBO.

    ReplyDelete
  23. > A current comic would work, too.

    Sandra Bernhard's pretty close.

    ReplyDelete
  24. My hint: re- my father being a toddler when she dies in the early 1920s.

    ReplyDelete
  25. My hints to ecoarchitect’s four fine puzzles:
    1. Jean 2. Leon 3. Henry and 4. DeForest are the middle names of Norma Baker (Marilyn “Roman,” Audie “Femur,” Bill “Because,” and Humphrey “Gar(t)bo.”
    GarboLambda

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great clueing, Lego.

      Word "Stuck in the Middle with You" Woman

      Delete
  26. My comment was “What a feeble puzzle. There's no way there won't be a lot of people getting this one.” “Feeble” is sort of “Phoebe”, “[t]here’s no way…“ contains “Snow” in the manner of the prior challenge. Phoebe Snow, in her song “No Show Tonight”, wrote the following lyric (or is it lyrics):

    “… I might be Sarah Heartburn …”

    ReplyDelete
  27. I must confess I was thinking of Eddie Regan Murphy, but Audie Murphy is a better answer. I did remove the "of the past" for that and Cosby.

    And I keep thinking that the Bogart ---> Garbo was a puzzler from the past, but that could be my imagination.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ecoarchitect, I had that sense as well about it's being a past puzzler.

      Delete
  28. After recalling that Will's puzzle had been used before, and also recalling the answer, I decided to look for an alternate answer.

    How about (Jean) Tierney becomes Knee Tear?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Phil J, Gene Tierney to Knee Tear: weeping joints?

      Delete
    2. I really like this one. It reminded me of a couple of things my Dad used to say:

      "Close enough for government work."
      and
      "Suits me, and I'm particular."

      Delete
    3. Quite the pronouncement, Sir Paul.

      Delete
  29. Next week's challenge: This challenge comes from listener Ed Pegg Jr., who runs the website Mathpuzzle.com. The word "sort" has an unusual property: the first letter, S, is found inside the word "first." The second letter, O, is found inside "second." The third letter, R, is found inside "third," and the fourth letter, T, is found inside "fourth." Think of a familiar three-word phrase in 10 letters that has the same property, in which every letter in the phrase is found inside its corresponding ordinal. Here's a hint: It's something most people have, lose and regain. What is it?

    ReplyDelete
  30. Next week's challenge: This challenge comes from listener Ed Pegg Jr., who runs the website Mathpuzzle.com. The word "sort" has an unusual property: the first letter, S, is found inside the word "first." The second letter, O, is found inside "second." The third letter, R, is found inside "third," and the fourth letter, T, is found inside "fourth." Think of a familiar three-word phrase in 10 letters that has the same property, in which every letter in the phrase is found inside its corresponding ordinal. Here's a hint: It's something most people have, lose and regain. What is it?

    ReplyDelete
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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    2. ... and, often, lose again.

      Delete