Thursday, August 28, 2008

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Aug 24): CH-CH-CH-CH-CHanges

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Aug 24): CH-CH-CH-CH-CHanges:
Q: Think of a person's job title that contains the consecutive letters C-H. Move the C-H to the front, then take what used to be the first letter and put it where the C-H was. The result will be another person whom the first person tries to catch. What words are these?
Hmm... another "less than satisfactory" puzzle. The answer came to me right away as I'm sure it has for others. Personally, I don't think the words are really such a pair, and the pairing is rather contrived. I'd give you more hints, but I don't think it would be fair to those that figured out on their own.

Edit: I don't think it was a coincidence that school starts around this time...
A: TEACHER --> CHEATER

Thursday, August 21, 2008

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Aug 17): U.S. Postal Abbreviation Quiz

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Aug 17): U.S. Postal Abbreviation Quiz:
Q: Take the two-letter postal abbreviations for three U.S. states. Add the letter A. Then add the two-letter postal abbreviations from three more states. You'll have 13 letters in all. Reading from left to right, you'll get a familiar three-word phrase that's seen on many products. (Hint: The three words in the answer phrase have four, two and seven letters respectively.) What's the phrase?
The puzzle is rather U.S.-centric. If you aren't familiar with the codes, here is a list of U.S. Postal Abbreviations. There are so many clues in the question itself that you shouldn't have any problem solving this. P.S. If you haven't seen this exact phrase recently, you might have at least seen ones similar to it.

Edit: Let's see how many submissions there are on this one... I thought it was pretty obvious.
Massachusetts (MA)
Delaware (DE)
Indiana (IN)
"A"
Maine (ME)
Rhode Island (RI)
California (CA)

A: MADE IN AMERICA

Saturday, August 16, 2008

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Aug 10): Product Playtime

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Aug 10): Product Playtime:
Q: Think of a familiar brand name ending in the letters G-S. Change the G-S to an O and you'll get the brand name of a different product. What is it? Hint: The first word has five letters, and the second has four.
I had more familiarity with the second term so I solved it backwards. My wife had no problem solving it forward.

Edit: Both of us had this as soon as we finished reading the question. Hopefully you found it as simple.
A: L'EGGS --> LEGO

Thursday, August 07, 2008

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Aug 3): Mathematical Synonyms

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Aug 3): Mathematical Synonyms:
Q: Start with an eight-letter mathematics term. Remove the first, fourth and eighth letters to produce a synonym of the original word. What is it?
A small percentage of the population might struggle on this, but I think most will find this puzzle relatively easy.

Edit: I was probably too obvious with the hints which included obvious synonyms of the answers. Check the comments for other hints that were provided.
A: FRACTION --> RATIO

Friday, August 01, 2008

Friday Fun - Cycling on the Bridge

Cycling on the BridgeTwo bicyclists start cycling from opposite ends of a bridge. One cyclist is faster than the other and they meet at a point 2,000 feet from the nearest end. When each cyclist reaches the opposite end of the bridge, he takes a 15 minute rest break and then starts on his on return trip. The cyclists again meet 720 feet from the other end. Assuming each is cycling at a constant speed, how long is the bridge?

Note: There is no mention of the actual speed of each cyclist, or the time that each takes but this problem is solvable. In fact, there is an elegant solution that could be understood by an elementary school student, with basic rules of addition and subtraction. It can also be solved the "hard" way. I'll post the elegant solution next week.

Edit: I've provided an answer in the comments.