Sunday, January 19, 2014

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jan 12, 2014): New Year's Resolution - Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jan 12, 2014): New Year's Resolution - Reduce, Reuse, Recycle:
Q: Name a familiar form of exercise in two words. Switch the order of the two words. Then say them out loud. The result phonetically will name something to wear. What is it?
I feel like I recently heard this on NPR.

Edit: This exact pair was given as the example on the recent Ask Me Another program.
A: TAE BO --> BOW TIE

144 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  3. Musical clue: John Philip Sousa

    Chuck

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  4. Back when I was living with my wives in Provo, puzzle solving was more of a group activity. Here at "college," I have only the walls to bounce my ideas off. Well, except for my cellmate, Andy. But he's one taco short of a combo plate. As it turns out, Andy solved it! Mostly because this was a big part of his exercise routine back in Spokane. Something you can wear? Well, maybe, I 'spose. But one thing for sure, you'd never catch any of the guys in this joint wearing one of these items. If they did, they might end up being used like the particular piece of equipment needed for this form of exercise. Just sayin,... Anyway, I gotta jet before the head cook, Mr. Armstrong, gets back and catches me using his computer.
    Later, gator!

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  5. Push up bra doesn't quite work.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. Ward, try wrapping it around your waist and hooking it up in FRONT of you. Then you just rotate it so the cups are back in front. Pull up the straps and voila!

      Delete
    3. Thanks for the supportive tip, AbqG. I am really feeling uplifted now. Must learn to do it one handed.

      Delete
    4. Indeed you should, Ward. It might not boost your Scrabble totals or your puzzle solving expertise, but without a doubt, it will improve your scoring ratio.

      Delete
    5. AbqGuerrilla, your instructions might also double as flight attendant directions, especially in the unlikely event of a water landing.

      Delete
  6. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  7. Despite Will's claim to the contrary, this is certainly an offbeat "form of exercise."

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    Replies
    1. TAE BO Total Body Fitness System. This is a portmanteau of TAE kwon do + BOxing.

      BOW TIE! “Something to wear.”

      My clue/hint,which lego detected, was the word “offbeat.” If you remove the 2 F's and read the remaining letters from right to left, you obtain “tae bo!”

      The “coincidence” that David (and Blaine) discovered about this puzzle having been aired previously, January 9, 2014, on the NPR program ASK ME ANOTHER under the title: “Homophones To Phone Home About” is remarkable! Click HERE to listen to this program.

      Delete
  8. I'd be willing to bet that Jay Carney, Ari Fleischer, Dee Dee Myers and Marlin Fitzwater all engaged in this form of "exercise" during their respective college years--and perhaps beyond.

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    Replies
    1. Cripes Almighty, AbqG, that's twice you've mentioned college today.. I wonder what Zipf would have to say about this.

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    2. An astute observation, Paul. I would only add--as Freud told his daughter when she asked him to interpret her sexual dreams-- "Sometimes, Liebchen, a dream is just a dream."

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    3. Sometimes it isn't. Later.

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    4. Musical clue..."Drove my Chevy to the levy but the levy was dry"...Don McLean

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    5. My Don McLean reference to American Pie (drove my Chevy to the levy) referred to the Chevy logo also referred to as the Chevy bowtie.

      Delete
  9. We’re all familiar with shadow boxing, a form of training exercise employed by pugilists. But there is another exercise of the mental variety in which amateur puzzleophiles (that’s us, folks) spar weekly with a professional enigmatologist named Will, who occasionally offers up challenges (such as the one this week) that many of us have shadowy recollections of.

    This adumbral mental exercise is known as “SHORTZ BOXING” and each of us is a Shortz Boxer. Pugilists wear BOXING SHORTS while beating each other silly, and many men, who are otherwise not silly, wear boxer shorts.

    A verbal exercise familiar to those who frequent Blaine’s Blog would qualify as an acceptable puzzle answer this week were it in two words. Alas it is only one word: BANTER, and a TURBAN is common headwear in many cultures.

    Besides the expected, pretty easy answer (which ron, above, reasonably deems an “offbeat” form of exercise) I have another plausible answer that involves a definitely “offbeat” and unfamiliar form of exercise. Who knows, Will might accept it. “Familiar” is a subjective adjective. (If Will accepts BOXING SHORTS, however, I’ll eat my boxer shorts!)

    TkoLambda

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  10. Musical clue: Frank Zappa

    -- Other Ben

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  11. Go to a search engine, put in "sunday puzzle xxxxxx yyyyyy" where the "xxxxxx yyyyyy"is the two word exercise and you will find something extremely coincidental. (You may have to look carefully at the search results.)

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    Replies
    1. Holy crap that's embarrassing.

      Delete
    2. David,

      Great investigative reporting! I agree, ron, this is what Blaine must have been hinting at.

      Coincidence? Doubtful. The material in question was uploaded just a few days ago. No, collusion or plagiarism are words that come closer to providing a plausible explanation. “What did Will know and when did he know it?” David, I believe you’ve uncovered a “Cryptogate!”

      LeakoLambda

      Delete
    3. Oh, like a re-used puzzle is unusual here lately?

      Delete
    4. And, David, if you enter "Sunday puzzle xxxxxx yyyyyy" exactly, something pertinent to our group shows up.

      Maybe I have brain coral where my gray matter used to be. No answer yet. But, I learned that the name of Anini Beach used to be Wanini Beach but some guy shot the 'W' off the sign (or it fell off in a hurricane ;-)). The locals said, "Ah, ok, that works."

      ~Ord~

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    5. ~ord,
      In west central Wisconsin where I grew up there is a village named Eleva (rhymes with Minnesota Twins’ great Tony Oliva). It was originally named "New Chicago," but one autumn a grain elevator letter painter got as far as "ELEVA" before winter struck. Newcomers assumed that was the name of the village and the stunted name struck. I always assumed this to be an urban folk legend (OK, small-town-rural folk legend) but the infallible Wikipedia sources the story to the Dictionary of Wisconsin History, which may or may not be infallible.
      LegoLam~

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    6. I didn't find this on any list. But it came to me at 5:30 this morning, while petting one of my cats. Will's cultural references tend to be rather dated. Daymare was on the list I was looking at last week, but right between happy things like Daycare and darling, so somehow I missed it. I submitted "Fling & flaying" which I think is pretty good, and at least deserves a mention, but I'm guessing some intern who's really uptight and has no sense of humor reads all our entries.

      Delete
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    Replies
    1. A comic strip/Jumble combo that is tangentially related to this week's puzzle. (For those not familiar, Pearls Before Swine is a comic strip that often features elaborate puns, usually with a final panel berating a cartoon version of the author Stephan Pastis.)

      Delete
    2. Connection to this week's puzzle:
      ˙sǝıʇ ʍoq ɓuıɹɐǝʍ ɹoɟ uʍouʞ sı ǝʎN llı��

      Hint:
      ˙ǝɯɐu s,ǝʎN llı�� ɟo ɯɹoɟ ɹɐlndod ɐ uo ʎɐld ɐ sı ɹǝʍsuɐ ǝɥ⊥

      Delete
  13. A friend of mine found what should surely be an acceptable alternate answer. We're sure it must be an alternate answer and not the intended one simply due to the fact that while it satisfies the puzzle's requirements, it does NOT require the word "phonetically"!

    Since nobody here has mentioned any solution for which the phonetic characteristic is not required, we both conclude that everyone else here who has posted has found a different solution.

    The exercise in our answer was found in a list on the website http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/list/index/selected/a, although NOT NECESSARILY with "A" selected. The exercise is listed in the plural. If you say out loud the two words of the exercise name in the singular in reverse order, you definitely get something that can be worn.

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    Replies
    1. Enyankovich_fan,

      (Please pardon my liberty-taking with your moniker.)
      Fine extra-credit work! I agree with hugh that the “thing worn” that is formed is indeed, from the perspective of wordplay, a thing of beauty. The “familiar form of exercise,” though, is familiar I would think only to hard-core weight trainers. I had never heard of it. Had you?

      That said, it’s still likely a legitimate and acceptable answer. “Phonetically” simply means “sounds the same”: guerrilla-boy and gorilla-boy are the same phonetically, but so are guerrilla-boy and guerrilla-boy. And, as I noted earlier, “familiar” is a subjective adjective. Who knows? Maybe Will’s a body builder and his Sunday Puzzle following skews toward the Charles Atlas/Arnold Schwarzenegger demographic.

      Here is a take-off on this week’s puzzle: Name a form of exercise in two words, one requiring its participants to be in incredibly great condition. Switch the order of the two words. Then say them aloud. The result will name something one might wear. What is it? Hint: No one has likely ever heard of this form of exercise, even body builders. (Maybe Superman has.)

      Schwarzeneggo-Lambda

      Delete
    2. Off base! The actual answer, once you have it, is obvious, i.e. obscure, but obvious!

      Delete
    3. Tell me, legolambda and/or benmar12001, in the actual answer, is the name of this exercise found on the list on the website http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/list/index/selected/a (again, with any letter highlighted)?

      Delete
    4. EaWaf,

      Yes, it is there, in the plural, just as you said it would be. (It is also nicely alliterative.) My point, restated, is that, while the thing you wear is very clever, the exercise is a tad obscure to the less-muscled among us.

      Lego...

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    5. legolamda:

      Could you please identify what it was "in the plural," above?

      Delete
    6. benmar12001,
      Yes. PIN PRESSES.

      Delete
  14. UNDOT
     ☐☐⃘☐⃘☐☐⃘

    COISK
     ☐☐⃘☐☐⃘☐⃘

    WEBSOT
    ☐⃘☐⃘☐☐☐☐⃘

    BRICES
    ☐☐☐☐⃘☐⃘☐⃘

    The rains of Kamino made for one ---
    ☐⃘☐⃘☐⃘ ☐⃘☐⃘☐⃘ ☐⃘☐⃘☐⃘☐⃘☐⃘☐⃘

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Connection to this week's puzzle:
      „˙ǝıʇ ʍoq„ ɟo ɯɐɹƃɐuɐ uɐ ǝɹɐ ɹǝʍsuɐ ǝɥʇ ɟo sɹǝʇʇǝl ǝǝɹɥʇ ʇsɹıɟ ǝɥ⊥

      Delete
  15. TRUBL
     ☐⃘☐⃘☐☐☐

    PALID
     ☐☐⃘☐⃘☐⃘☐

    ULECKS
    ☐⃘☐☐☐⃘☐⃘☐

    DENBOY
    ☐⃘☐☐⃘☐☐⃘☐

    Vomog pt pam jhrxz-gfqkgl Tkewjrfbp pmvx ceth gfkf ---
    ☐⃘☐⃘☐⃘☐⃘☐⃘ ☐⃘☐⃘☐⃘☐⃘☐⃘☐⃘

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  16. FLYTO
     ☐⃘☐☐⃘☐☐

    NOPAR
     ☐⃘☐☐⃘☐☐

    TADCLY
    ☐☐⃘☐☐☐☐⃘

    DOEFUN
    ☐⃘☐☐☐☐☐⃘

    The taxi driver offered a seasonal ---
    ☐⃘☐⃘☐⃘☐⃘ ☐⃘☐⃘☐⃘☐⃘

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Connection to this week's puzzle:
      ˙ɐʇsɐd ǝıʇ ʍoq ɹoɟ ǝɯɐu ǝɥʇ ɟo ɯɐɹƃɐuɐ uɐ sı ɹǝʍsuɐ ǝɥ⊥

      Delete
    2. Planned Chaos, how do you get text to show as upside down?

      Delete
    3. WW:
      Turn your keyboard around.

      Delete
    4. PlannedChaos, flipping out with excitement! Mahalo.

      Delete
  17. The above Jumbles render correctly in WebKit-based browsers (Chrome and Safari), but not so in Firefox (I can't speak for Internet Explorer).

    Here's what they're supposed to look like.

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  19. Does folding laundry count as exercise?

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    Replies
    1. I'm not really sure, but I do know that I prefer folding money.

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    2. Yes, SDB, but if you worked for CREEP back in 1972 you had to launder it first.

      Delete
    3. Ah, but I was living in Italy in 1972. And I was not Leery of my lira.

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    4. Lego, perchance were you schooling in Rome in 1972?

      Delete
  20. Finally came to me. Paul Simon & certain other hints have some remote relevance.

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  21. Well I sure am a tenacious SOB! I got the alternate answer either late Sunday or early Monday, but did not put it together until a few hours later. I suspected I did not have the intended answer however, and could not let go. I just finished dinner and for some unknown reason decided to look at a photo of my maternal grandfather who was wearing a pale version of this garment in a professional photo of him on stage. It got me to thinking and I did a little research and it got me to the intended answer. I have to admit that I have not heard of this "familiar" form of exercise before. benmar is correct; it is obvious when discovered.

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    Replies
    1. GOOD NEWS. Know news is good news. Be sure to watch the video. Glad to hear you have the answer.

      Delete
    2. Merci beau coup, ron! That is super funny. I love dry humour, similar to my martinis.

      Delete
    3. Check this one out:

      http://sciencefocus.com/news/jellyfish-inspire-novel-flying-robot

      Delete
  22. When I first read this puzzle, in the middle of the night immediately after it was posted, I thought of LASER BALL & BLASER, but knew it would not wash. (No dry cleaning comments, please!) I now see that were someone actually "familiar" with this form of exercise he would likely get the intended answer quickly, but that is taking enormous liberties with the term, "familiar" in my opinion. I have been active in various forms of exercise, including weight lifting, all my adult life and never heard of this form until now. I am elated that I was able to discover the intended answer, but displeased that I was misled in my pursuit. Thursday I will post both answers.

    NOTE: The prove I am real question word was RINGS. Funny.

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  23. Although I never mastered either, I still consider myself relatively fit and well dressed.

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  24. (Note to Blaine: Very clever and alliterative blog headline this week.)

    The two uppercase words at the end of the following doggerel about my cat constitute a clue that leapfrogs upon TomR’s musical clue, Paul Simon. (Only half the letters pertain to a non-musical clue, Paul Simon.)

    My kitten’s form of exercise
    Means bounding up a chair,
    Hang-gliding flying-squirrel-wise.
    Corkscrewing in mid-air.

    She executes a four-paw landing
    On a safety net
    Of sofa cushions, then, upstanding,
    Takes off like a jet…

    …Or some ascending early bird
    In search of worm or snail,
    Then morphs into a whirlybird
    And chases her own tail.

    She pounces on a phantom mouse
    Then, like shot from a cannon,
    Catapults across the house,
    Crash-lands like Molly Shannon.

    My furry phoenix rises, takes
    Five minutes to renew
    Composure, catch her breath, and make
    An AEROBATIC MEW.

    Doggerelambda

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Isn't your cat upset by your use of doggerel to describe her? Would she not prefer caterwaul? I'm just feline things out here.

      Delete
    2. No mews: catastrophic.

      Enjoyed your poem, Doggerelambda.

      Delete
    3. No mews is good mews. Muse over that one.

      Delete
    4. I thought I was your muse, skydiveboy.

      Delete
    5. Quite an assumption, I assume. However, I do find it amusing. Am use still enjoying your awaycation? Have you solved this stinker of a puzzle yet whilst basking, or whatever it is one does over there?

      Seriously though, go out of your way to try some Maui Chips while there. That is not their real name, but what people refer to them as. They are Kitch'n Cook'd Maui Potato Chips. People kill for them. They sell out early each day, I'm told. Nothing like them anywhere else in the world and you cannot get them here.

      Delete
    6. I'd hoped for bemusement. ;-)

      Yes, I am enjoying the island. The sea turtle I swam with yesterday looked like she was flying in the water with her smooth, coordinated flipper ballet highlighted by the afternoon sun. We hung together for an hour. :-)

      I have an answer & will post later in the day as we moved our hiking trip to Waimea Canyon to Thurs...and I will look for the chips, sdb!

      Delete
    7. Honey, comb on! I hive to say I am bee amused, I swarm. Now don't get all in a flutter. That's the buzz for now. I bee onnet.

      Delete
  25. I've been a little remiss in posting here lately. This week I was slow on the uptake to get the answer, so that' my excuse, er, reason for posting late on a Weds night. But, having started a job three months ago where my new manager was seven month pregnant, I've been busy learning the ropes quickly to get up to speed before she went on maternity leave. So, less time lately for idle blogging.

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    Replies
    1. Sure, sure. Next thing you'll be telling us you had nothing to do with lane closures on the George Washington Bridge. :-)

      Delete
  26. That's right... I didn't know about the bridge closure until my staff told me about it later. Or, was I the guy putting out the cones. I forget... ;-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Watch this:

      http://www.philly.com/philly/wires/ap/entertainment/20140115_ap_efc26a7fa6e44827a78c69ede80c65ae.html

      Delete
  27. sorry so late again. I was busy playing a very competitive card game with my grandson. it was nip and tuck but he managed to destroy me, not really. no blood no foul.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Nancy Simon's wedding dress?
    That's a really bad joke (for an incredible number of reasons) which makes me more than a □□□ □□□begone.

    x+z=8y
    x-z=2(b+c)
    by=z+1
    y=b²
    x=n+c-b
    z=2(a+2c-b)
    y=a+c
    n=abc
    b+x=c(y-2)
    a(x-1)=y(b+c)
    ab=c-1
    2a=c-b

    Now, where's that gadget that unlocks my Town Car?

    ReplyDelete
  29. TAE BO > BOW TIE

    Alternate answer:

    EZ-Curl > Curl Ease (towel)

    I got the alternate one first and noted a similarity with the puzzle answer a couple of weeks ago when the answer was Lay Z Boy, but I was surprised no one seemed to hint at that connection. This caused me to keep thinking about it with emphasis on boxing and court sports, such as hand ball. I could not find anything in any list that was of help. When I looked at a very old photo of my professional magician grandfather in white tie and tails on stage with his ventriloquist dummy, Joey, who we suspect shared matching IQs with my grandfather, I got the idea of Ty Bo, and Google corrected me with their suggestion of Tae Bo. My question now is, “familiar” to whom? Not me!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mr. Tae Bo is Billy Blanks.

      Delete
    2. I never heard of Billy Blanks.

      Delete
    3. SDB, the men in your family certainly followed interesting professions. I assume your dad was not an accountant.

      Delete
    4. Nope, a Boeing engineer. My maternal grandfather, I assume you are referring to him, was a very polished and successful stage magician who also used the dummy which I mentioned who is now in my basement, but his tear ducts are probably dried up by now. He also did monologs and mind reading with my grandmother meandering through the audience and asking him to identify whatever patron object she was holding. It was some kind of code they did. Sadly, he had arthritis and could not perform his magic when I was a young boy and very interested. Now I am retired from a career in skydiving I do close up magic for parties, etc. I have even taught myself to ripple shuffle a deck of cards with one hand. No help from him, which I always have regretted, but understand. I almost forgot to mention that he knew Houdini.

      Delete
  30. Tae Bo, bow tie

    Last Sunday I said, “Musical clue: John Philip Sousa.” Sousa was perhaps the preeminent composer of martial music. Tae Bo incorporates martial arts moves.

    Chuck

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    Replies
    1. John Philip Sousa was involved in the Boxer Rebellion and was also into boxing. I thought you were referring to these facts as hints.

      Delete
  31. zaftig (pleasingly plump) => Rubensesque (in the style of Peter Paul Rubens) phonetically => Ruebensesque (in the style of Paul Ruebens) => like Pee Wee Herman (wearing a big red BOW TIE).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I thought you might be referring to puffy boxing gloves.

      Delete
    2. And I thought the reference was to botox.

      Delete
  32. Ok, got the call. Any advice for me? Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Even though it's not live I will still be cheering for you Sunday morning. You go, sis!

      Delete
  33. Congrats, Marie. I am sure there are a few who will share their experiences. I did not get this week although you would have thought I would since I enjoyed looking at the video instructor who was ALWAYS on tv late at night. Billy somebody? Some Body!

    ReplyDelete
  34. As mentioned above, I found the following in a Google search using "sunday puzzle tae bo": http://tpr.org/post/homophones-phone-home-about#.UtMf0FFdXe8.email
    Notice the published date. I did that search because I thought that there was a previous Sunday Puzzle with Tae Bo as part of the question or answer.

    Now for an alternate puzzle: Name a familiar(?) form of exercise in two words. Switch the initial consonant sound of the two words. Then say them out loud. The result phonetically will name something to drink. What is it?

    ReplyDelete
  35. Another answer:

    Spin Class > Class Pin

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  36. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  37. I forgot to mention that I got caught up for awhile trying to make "training bra" work, but it turned out to be a bust.

    ReplyDelete
  38. Marie –

    Some simple advice.

    1. Relax.
    2. Be alone.
    3. Have a sheet of paper and pencil with you just in case it might come in handy.

    Enjoy!

    Chuck

    ReplyDelete
  39. War gsme
    Gamewear
    War and wear sound alike in my hometown :-)

    ReplyDelete
  40. The acceptable alternate answer to which I was referring in my post earlier this week: PIN PRESS ==> PRESS PIN.

    ReplyDelete
  41. As alluded to above, last week's edition of "Ask Me Another" included a game they called "Homophones To Phone Home About", with this example: "What would you call a type of neck-wear worn while participating in a form of exercise founded by Billy Blanks? A 'Tae Bo-bow tie'! "


    ReplyDelete
  42. "Not too hard" referred to the knot of the bowtie.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I thought you were referring to EZ-Curl.

      Delete
    2. Nice clue Snipper, but my post of January 14th expresses a different point of view!

      Delete
  43. My stuff explained:

    EaWAf’s non-phonetic answer was PIN PRESS/PRESS PIN.

    The two uppercase words at the end of my cat-doggerel, AEROBATIC MEW, anagrams into BOWTIE/CAMERA. In Paul Sinmon’s “America” song, the singer says to Cathy, “Be careful, his bowtie is really a camera.” Thus, BOWTIE = CAMERA.

    The non-musical Paul Simon clue refers to former U.S. Sen. Paul Simon (Dem. Ill), who notably wore a bowtie. A clue I didn’t give was “U.S. Sen. Al Franken” (Dem. Minn.), who in SNL primary debate skits portrayed Sen. Simon, and delivered a punch line that usually involved a reference to “the bowtie.”

    Regarding the “take-off on this week’s puzzle:” Name a form of exercise in two words, one requiring its participants to be in incredibly great condition. Switch the order of the two words. Then say them aloud. The result will name something one might wear. What is it? Hint: No one has likely ever heard of this form of exercise, even body builders. (Maybe Superman has.)”

    The exercise is MILE DASHINGS. What one might wear is a DASHING SMILE. (No one has heard of a “mile dash” because most people have to pace themselves in a mile run, except maybe Superman.

    My other “plausible answer that involves a definitely “offbeat” and unfamiliar form of exercise” depends on the following web site: http://www.bosch-ebike.de/en/produkte_neu/nyon/nyon__portal_und_apps.php

    This training exercise, called “E-BIKING,” becomes “BIKINI” when you do what Will’s puzzle stipulates.

    Finally, if you google “tae bo bowtie ask me another npr” you will understand “Cryptogate.”

    Lego…

    ReplyDelete
  44. I had SPIN CLASS and CLASP PIN. Perhaps my clues will make sense now...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. AbqG,
      Another good answer! Lotta smart Blaine bloggers.

      Delete
  45. TAE BO >>> BOW TIE

    "Shoot the 'W' " off bow to get bo, like the guy who shot the 'W' off Wanini Beach to get Anini Beach.

    Misty, green, red-rocked Waimea Canyon: where an average of 450+ inches of rain falls per year (most of it today ;-)). One year 683 inches of rain fell on Mount Wai'ale'ale.

    We met folks from Seattle, New Jersey, Nebraska, Germany, and Australia. The Seattle folks said it felt just like home.


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. W should have been shot long ago.

      Delete
    2. How did the New Jersey people get there, I thought the bridge was closed?

      Delete
    3. The Secret Service will be at your door any minute now, SDB...

      Delete
    4. jan,
      Thanks for the heads-up. I will hide my fake twenty's.

      Delete
  46. "Beauty":
    Bow = BEAU (Bridges) and
    Tie = TY (Cobb)
    et AL. (who?)


    ReplyDelete
  47. Taping is done. Whew! I didn't fall flat on my face and it was a bit fun, so I am happy. Thank you all for your good wishes and helpful tips. They made all the difference and I appreciate it. I am looking forward to wearing my hard-earned lapel pin!
    BTW, in the real world, I am Christine and I am grateful for Blaine's Puzzle Blog.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Did you happen to hear the new puzzle?

      Delete
    2. The blogisphere isn't the real world? :-(

      Delete
  48. Yeah we forgot to put that on the list of to do's Share the next puzzle with Blaine Bloggers. Congrats, looking forward to hearing you on Sunday!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I did hear the new puzzle but I was such a bundle of nerves I don't have an accurate memory of it. I think I better sit on it rather than risk misstating it. Sorry!

      Delete
    2. No problem. I am sure I would be the same way.

      Delete
  49. Just trying it out:

    Flip text with and without reversing it.

    (dnǝpısuʍoᗡ) Oᙠ Ǝ∀⊥

    ⊥∀E ßO (Doʍᴎꙅıqɘnb)

    ReplyDelete
  50. Replies
    1. Above I asked: "Now for an alternate puzzle: Name a familiar(?) form of exercise in two words. Switch the initial consonant sound of the two words. Then say them out loud. The result phonetically will name something to drink. What is it?"

      The answer is:
      TAI CHI / CHAI TEA
      which is too close to the real puzzle answer to post even before Thursday.

      Delete
  51. Another awful puzzle just came up:

    Next week's challenge from Ed Pegg Jr. of MathPuzzle.com: Name a famous person whose first and last names together contain four doubled letters — all four of these being different letters of the alphabet. Who is it? For example, Buddy Holly's name has two doubled letters, D and L.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Was the famous person a subbookkeeper?

      Delete
  52. You are right, it is lame. I'm guessing we will come up with many answers.

    ReplyDelete
  53. Nice job, Marie/Christine! You were great!

    ReplyDelete
  54. I have one with five pairs of double letters with four of them different. Not exactly what they are asking.

    ReplyDelete
  55. I had COURT TENNIS --> TENNIS SKORT

    http://www.uscourttennis.org/

    ReplyDelete