Sunday, July 22, 2018

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jul 22, 2018): Part Human

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jul 22, 2018): Part Human:
Q: Name two parts of the human body. Say them out loud one after the other. The result, phonetically, will name something delicious to eat, in 7 letters. What is it?
I could claim credit for this puzzle based on something I wrote several years back.

Edit: I used BROW, KNEE (BROWNIE) as a hint to a previous puzzle involving body parts.
A: BROW, KNEE (BROWNIE)

140 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. Great job, Blaine! You've earned your fame.

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  3. The girls might have an advantage over the guys this week.

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  4. Hmmm, body parts and something delicious to eat? I hope we are not talking about cannibalism this week.

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    Replies
    1. Or even carnivory. Many people like to eat rib-eyes, but that's not much of a puzzle.

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  5. Fatback wouldn't be a good answer either.
    TV clue: Barney Miller

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  6. As puzzles go, this one's sort of bush-league.

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    Replies
    1. Musical clue: 10,000 Maniacs

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    2. But as a puzzle it’s doing a hack of a good job.

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    3. Katrina's Fair is a deep cut from 10,000 Maniacs' days as an upstate-NY college band.

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  7. Warning: parts of tulips are poisonous.

    If you are persistent the right internet search can help.

    I have 2 other answers besides the intended, one requires a little faith. The other is a holy mackerel.

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  8. Replies
    1. I think you are hinting at something below the surface? I'm obscure, but not that hard. I may have misinterpreted your Canadian earthquake, or I may have out-obscured you in my response. Which would make me very happy.

      The truth will out on Thursday.

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    2. Yes, indeed, eco. I look forward to your out-obscuration on Thursday.

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    3. I think I know what WW is hinting at, but when I Google "earthquake" and the food, I get a hit that points to the United Arab Emirates, rather than Canada.

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    4. Jan, I went to the same place, thence my response.

      Clearly we are on the wrong track, but to borrow from last week it is hard to follow The Scent of a Word Woman.

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  9. Technically speaking, does one eat gumballs?

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  11. I cannot speak to the taste but I know some people love the smell of "nape palm" in the morning. I also have to thank Jean for help on this one.

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  12. Got it thanks to my photographic memory.

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  13. Hip eyes - yeah I'm talking 'bout you.

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  14. Replies
    1. Mew cuss

      LegoBelieves'SnotNaughtyToMewBut'SnotNiceToCuss

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    2. Eco's comment about this puzzle's possible gender bias didn't give away the answer, but it did lead me to the right general area. I really wanted LASH to work. Mucus is GOOey; that's the best I could do.

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  15. Blaine: Yes you certainly could claim credit!

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  16. These aren't high on my list. --Margaret G.

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    Replies
    1. as in - I don't put MJ in my brownies!

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    2. Margaret, I don't put Mendo Jim in my brownies, either.

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  17. The delicious food isn't found in an "eyes chest."

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  18. I found an unintended answer when combining a facial part and a woman’s body part (I’m deciding not to print here). Then I got the intended answer.

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    1. WW - I’m hoping my unintended answer places me high on your list of clues.

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    2. Snipper, I hope so, too. As I don't know your answer yet, though, I'm thinking it may not be suitable for Sunday morning?

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    3. The woman’s body part (shortened) will be known to Seinfeld fans. If that’s your flavor of sitcom.

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    4. And yes, it’s not suitable for Sunday morning.

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    5. Snipper, could your alternate answer also be slang for books that "consist of heroine-centered narratives that focus on the trials and tribulations of their individual protagonists?"

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    6. Close. You got the 2nd part! The first part is the singular of a classic movie.

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    7. Ah, got it. The movie is very popular this time of year. Clever. It makes the list.

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    8. There's also one clue above to the actual answer that is oh so good. More on Thursday (but not Moron Thursday.

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  19. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    1. I did not intend for my hint to be so "on the nose". Oops! If I gave it away, my bad. :(

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    2. Actually, I wondered if you were thinking of palmiers (which if said without a French accent might be a combination of PALM-EARS). --Margaret G.

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  20. Speaking of duckboats, I saw several of these duckboats near lakes in northern AR, just south of Branson. (There is a hint in there.)

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  21. Before we eat, will we have time for a cocktail?

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  22. Jean,

    I know you didn't mean this to happen, but as soon as I read your post, the answer popped into my head.

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  23. Oh, finally I got it. Not a bad puzzle. Extract the middle three letters to get another food.

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    1. Some say it's delicious; I don't know from personal experience.

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    2. I prefer your other food to the original.

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    3. I don't know that I've ever tasted BRIE; if I did, I either didn't know what it was or didn't care enough to remember it. So, I have no opinion of my OWN about how delicious it is or isn't.

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  24. No unused clues in the on air challenge this week.

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  25. Oh, it is something delicious! No clue here, just, mmmmm!

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  26. Replies
    1. I wonder about your last comment. Maybe unaware.

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    2. On Sunday SDB was very proud of his being nice to WW, and announced he was going back to being naughty. He is entirely aware.

      And I strongly suggest you don't look too carefully at the dialog between Snipper and WW above; they make SDB look like a he graduated charm school ....

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  28. Well that took longer than needed. I should have tumbled to it much sooner.

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  29. Too bad I can't play the banjo, come to think of it.

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  30. Surprised that I remembered something from 4/16/2017. An old chestnut.

    As a stretch, I liked a kin to a French baba.

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  32. This puzzle reminds me of ancient Chinese proverb:
    Man with one chopstick go hungry

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  33. To paraphrase Warren Zevon: Things to do in Denver with the dead.

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  34. Cranberry’s, “Barney Miller,” clue, which brought to mind Detective Fish, had me headed in the wrong direction for the longest time. It was a heck of a job of misdirection.

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    1. I did have to come up with the answer "crawfish" for a type of pie on this week's Puzzleria!, and then change it to "raw fish". Neither one I would consider delicious, though.

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    2. That would depend on whether you are a fan of sashimi, which is the name of one of our Siamese cats.

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  35. Not to wax philosophical or take a potshot at the puzzle creator, but “delicious” is too subjective.

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    1. I never met anyone that didn't like the answer.

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    2. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    3. I have turned down the food when offered. For me it’s just too much in one flavor direction to enjoy. And delicious is a subjective word - how can it be too subjective?

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    4. I have turned it down too...but not because it wasn't delicious.

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    5. I bet we all know of someone who doesn't like them.

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    6. The controversy over deliciousness, ironically, usually comes down to whether or not you include body parts.

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    7. Are you saying you don't like nuts in your brownies?

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    8. Yup. And cinnamon buns are better without raisins. Chacun a son gout.

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    9. I'm going to guess the deleted comment had something to do with Sara Lee.

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  36. Following Seattle's lead, today, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors will be taking a straw vote on whether to ban plastic straws.

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    Replies
    1. And on the day when the Giants are in town play the Mariners.

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    2. SDB: I imagine they will use paper straws for the vote too.

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    3. And a very good game it was. Again this afternoon, but with the only TV in San Francisco on Facebook of all places.

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  37. Does anyone here have an explanation of why every headline and story about the Duckboat tragedy uses the term "capsize" when there are no witness claims, videos or photos of it's doing so?

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    1. No explanation here, from the videos I've seen, I would have described it as being "swamped".
      The other day, in a news interview with an "expert", the expert pronounced a bilge pump failure as a "billage" pump failure.

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    2. My cap size is 7. I hope that helps.

      I heard the "billage" comment too, and was amazed until it occurred to me that the Duck Boat franchise owner might have stashed his bills down below by the bilge pump, which caused it to clog up and fail due to billage.

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  38. BROW, KNEE >>>BROWNIE

    “Canadian earthquake” refers to the BROWNIES I use to represent the stable craton of Canada in an earthquake; a similar pan of jello represents Haiti. {The kids then eat the experiment after making earthquake-proof structures from mini-marshmallows and toothpicks.} I was talking about P and S waves in earthquakes but I'm not sure what jan and eco were talking about in the discussion that followed.

    “Speaking of duckboats, I saw several of these duckboats near lakes in northern AR, just south of Branson. (There is a hint in there.)“ Not only is AR the abbreviation for Arkansas, it is also the initials for Andy Rooney, of famous eyeBROW fame.

    My favorite clue is Margaret G's "These are not high on my list" as in pot BROWNIES.

    "Jim Carrey" is for the French carré, meaning square, as in BROWNIE squares.

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    1. I figured out your P and S waves, hence my "below the surface" reply, which is the third type of seismic wave.

      But I never took your class, so didn't know about your "treat"ment of seismic events. I thought you were talking about Dairy Queen's Oreo® Brownie Earthquake. If you type Canadian earthquake brownie in Google, that site from the UAE is first, and not far down is a web page about the loss of that yummy treat from Canada. Kind of nauseating.

      My "many happy returns" was a reference to DQ's "soft serve" ice cream; for me at least soft serves in tennis/ volleyball/ racquetball yield happy returns, or at least not flubbing it completely.

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    2. I also liked Dave's "photographic memory" post.

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    3. eco, that brownie earthquake photo makes my teeth hurt.

      I thought I'd posted about seismic brownies and jello over at PEOTS before. You can now see some photos HERE at the end of the post, just above the first comment.

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    4. Slightly familiar, I trust your memory more than mine about previous postings. I'll post over there about the current technology in "earthquake-proof structures"; though there is actually no such thing.

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  39. BROW + KNEE  BROWNIE

    My comment, regarding, “…a heck of a job of misdirection.” Was a play on George W. Bush’s comment during the Hurricane Katrina cleanup to then FEMA head, Michael Brown, “Brownie, you’re doing a heck of a job.”

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  40. "The girls might have an advantage over the guys this week." Anyone here a Brownie before they were a Girl Scout?

    "If you are persistent the right internet search can help." Not Google or Duckduckgo, but merely searching on this blog for "body part" would have brought up many puzzles, including Dec 28, 2014, which had Blaine's note about brow-knee/ brownie. So technically Blaine's comment was a potential giveaway, but it's not for me to say.

    "I have 2 other answers besides the intended, one requires a little faith. The other is a holy mackerel." Qi-toes --> Cheetos (many Asian philosophies and religions believe Qi is part of the body) and boney-toes --> bonitos, part of the mackerel family.

    "I bet we all know of someone" (perhaps part of Cult 45) who has used that racist term to describe dark-skinned people.

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    1. I misinterpreted. I figured girls would know more about cosmetics and such, which led me to eyelashes and eventually eyebrows.
      See my comments above.

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  41. BROW + KNEE = BROWNIE

    > Great job, Blaine! You've earned your fame.



    I couldn’t very well have said, \"You’re doing a heckuva job\", could I? “Fame” is an anagram of FEMA. And “earned” hinted at Brownie points.

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  42. I was thinking of an alternate answer. It may be a stretch but how about:

    RUMP  EYES

    RUM PIES

    It just depends if the final answer has to be singular or plural. Here's an example. There are other flavors, too!

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    1. I also came up with rump eyes > rum pies. And I wanted Chin Knees > Chinese to work. I tried Abalone too.

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  43. My clue was: "To paraphrase Warren Zevon: Things to do in Denver with the dead."

    Or more accurately, Things to do in Denver with the (Grateful) Dead. As in eating marijuana brownies. Colorado was one of the first states to legalize marijuana for recreational purposes. Marijuana Brownies are a favorite consumable.

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    1. If I remember correctly both Washington and Colorado legalized it at the same time, but WA took longer to implement the law.

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    2. That's correct. CO implemented the law in January 2014 and WA implemented it 6 months later.

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    3. At the risk of a pot-ential war between the states: WA legalized recreational use Dec 6, 2012, 4 days before CO. But California legalized medicinal use way back in 1996 by voter referendum.

      Not sure why it took CA so long to legalize recreational use, but I know the police around here hadn't done any enforcement for many, many years. I wish more folks would use brownies, the smell of joints reminds me of my art teacher's office.

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    4. WW, SDB, Eco,
      Now you see why I said one of the first. ;~)
      I am pretty sure that Colo. were the first to have shops with recreational pot for sale.

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    5. It looks like the pot is calling the kettle brown(ie).

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  44. Who nose why olfactory workers smell?

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  45. BROW + KNEEBROWNIE

    You're doing a heckuva job, Brownie!” Bush's comment about Michael Brown, the Bush Appointee as Director of FEMA. Bush league puzzle!

    Snipper's “unintended answer": JAW BUST EARS → JAWBUSTERS?

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    1. I was really hoping that was NOT Snipper's answer.

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    2. Then there are books about street chalk art, too, right?

      Chalk Lit

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  46. My hints:

    NYT XWD 4/16/17 96 acr: "BROWNIE" clue for "girl scout"

    Kin to a French baba(au rhum): RUMP and EYE: RHUM PIE

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  47. My unintended answer referenced above (on Sunday) - though it is 9 letters - is my favorite flavor of brownies.

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  48. How about toe-footie and tofutti? ("Footie" is a body part to quite a few small children.)

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    1. Yes - very cute - I like it! --Margaret G.

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  49. BROW+KNEE=BROWNIE
    My "Barney Miller" clue referred to an episode in which Wojo's then-girlfriend made some BROWNIES laced with hashish, which many of the cops at the 12th Precinct had tried with hilarious results(most notably Yemana, who occasionally went up to the others and "whispered" in their ear, "Mweeshy mweeshy!"). Luckily, Barney didn't try any, so he must have figured something was up.
    My banjo comment was in reference to the line from "O Susanna": "I come from Alabama with a banjo on my KNEE."
    Actually being from Alabama, I just couldn't resist.
    Judging from previous posts, I see quite a few of us went for the "heckuva job" line from former President(Dubya)Bush. Great minds think alike. BTW Snipper, I figured out what body parts you put together for your unintended answer, and you should be ashamed of yourself(funny as it was)!

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    1. No, I don't see any reason to be ashamed. They are both human body parts (though one is a shortened version of the term.)

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  50. We entered Brownie too but thought of another alternate answer we do not see here: earhead, like Airhead the candy.

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  51. Attention Blainesvillians:
    This week's "Joseph Young's Puzzleria!" (just now uploaded; see Blaine's PUZZLE LINKS) features a special treat. Our Schpuzzle of the Week is another delicious and ingenious Cryptic Crossword Puzzle whipped up by regular Blainesville commenter “cranberry.”
    While you are there, also check out six other fresh puzzles on our menus.
    You are all welcome to drop by any time. Thanks.

    LegoCryptically

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  52. I wish the puzzle hadn’t gone out of its way to be easy. The word “phonetically” was a clear direction fro me that one of the words perhaps sounded different than it was spelled, or that it could be spelled alternatively. Knee jumped out, making the common ending -nie a thought. With the 7 letters clue it wasn’t hard to find 4 letter common body parts. It was an easy puzzle made unnecessarily easier.

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    Replies
    1. Decided right off that the food was going to end in either:
      1. toes as in tomatoes, potatoes, burritos...
      2. knees as in weenies, coneys, brownies...

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    2. Canny solving approach, Mort Canard. I'll bet you solve a great majority of Will Shortz's NPR puzzles.

      LegoWhoSolvesAGreatMinorityOfWillShortz'sPuzzles

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    3. Buck Bard,
      You make a great and very insightful point. When I am constructing my puzzles over on Puzzleria!, one of my toughest tasks is to determine just the right wording and amount of information to reveal to make the puzzle "not too hard and not too soft, but juuust riiight!"

      LeGoldilocksWhoBearsTheWeightOfEnigmatologyOnHisShoulders!

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    4. legolamda,
      I solve more of the puzzles since I joined this blog. Not so much from the clues, although that sometimes points me in the right direction. I find that I am encouraged to keep working on the puzzle rather than wait till next Sunday to fine out what the answer is.

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    5. Only 400 correct answers this week. It wasn't that easy.

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  53. Next week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from listener Mark Oshin of Portland, Ore. Think of a familiar two-word phrase in 8 letters — with 4 letters in each word. The first word starts with M. Move the first letter of the second word to the end and you'll get a regular 8-letter word, which, amazingly, other than the M, doesn't share any sounds with the original two-word phrase. What phrase is it?

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  54. Not sure I want to give this one my stamp of approval.

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  55. I wouldn't exactly call it a "regular" 8-letter word. I'm definitely more familiar with the two-word phrase than the word it becomes.

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  56. Just saw this after being on holidays... Although I agree with the correct answer, I submitted calf+ear = kefir and since kefir is pronounced rightly as ke-FEAR, I thought this was a decent answer.

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  57. Whoops. I took the 7 letters to be the formation of the word. Never mind!

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