Sunday, September 16, 2018

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Sep 16, 2018): Uncommon Commonality

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Sep 16, 2018): Uncommon Commonality:
Q: These five 2-word phrases have something very unusual in common. What is it? When you find it, think of another two-word phrase that has the same property.

● Property rights
● Land mine
● Sales order
● Color scheme
● India ink
You are all very capable students of Will Shortz.

Edit: Using the same pattern on "CAPable STudents", we have CAPital and STate.
A: The first 3 letters (of the first word) are the start a state capital and the first 2 letters (of the second word) are the state postal code.
PROperty RIghts --> PROvidence, RI
LANd MIne --> LANsing, MI
SALes ORder --> SALem, OR
COLor SCheme --> COLumbia, SC
INDia INk --> INDianapolis, IN

A few possible phrases that also work:
BOSs MAn / BOSun's MAte --> BOSton, MA
COLlege SCholarship --> COLumbia, SC
DENtal COverage --> DENver, CO
HARbor PAtrol / HARem PAnts --> HARrisburg, PA
INDefinite INtegral --> INDianapolis, IN
LINgual NErve --> LINcoln, NE
LITerary ARts --> LITtle Rock, AR
MADeira WIne --> MADison, WI
PROmise RIng --> PROvidence, RI
RICkets VAccine --> RIChmond, VA
SACral CAnal / SACred CAbal --> SACramento, CA

131 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. It took some digging, but I finally came up with a decent phrase. It was much harder than I thought.

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    1. I got my additional phrase right away.

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  3. Please disregard my comment at the end of the previous thread. I've figured it out now.

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    1. You gave me the answer last week. I posted how toward the end of last week’s thread.

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  4. Hardly passes for a real puzzle this week and disappointed that he didn’t acknowledge the issue with last week’s wording re Mobil.

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  5. OK OK, is it half-cocked to think there could be a dozen decent answers?

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. I've got a list of 48, most of which you really wouldn't call common phrases.

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    3. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    4. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    5. I got a few common phrase answers, so I think there's probably at least a dozen decent ones. --Margaret G

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  6. Replies
    1. Visited Jamestown, NY yesterday where the Lucy and Desi Museum is located. Went to the National Comedy Center. Alas, I wish your clue helped.

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    2. It is, alas, not a clean clue. . .

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    3. Oh, now I get it, I think!
      Siz was going for Des Moines, Iowa, which opens up what I might call a "closed but unlocked door" in this puzzle. Cranberry's list of non-capital cities points to another such "door" and I suspected that it was this lack of rigor that Mendo Jim objected to, but, after reading his latest commentt, I think he had a slightly different beef.

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    4. Anyway, I found the puzzle exTREmely eNJoyable.

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  7. As usual, first I solved the puzzle, then I found an additional example, then I thought of a clever (?) clue, and only much later did I figure out Blaine's clue.

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  8. Is it too much to give a possible phrase to see if I got the right answer?

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    1. It might be better not to. I suspect you already know you have the right answer anyway.

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    3. I think I have to face up to the fact that I really don’t have a clue.

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  9. It's on the tip of my tongue... and the roof of my mouth.

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  10. If anyone thinks this puzzle is a lost cause, I certainly wouldn't want to be a part of their pity party. It is what Will decided, after all.

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  11. Musical clues: Glen Campbell and Dennis Coffey

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  12. Some of the worst Shortz puzzles over the years have been built around a phrase like "something very unusual in common."
    And he has been impervious to proof otherwise every time.

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  13. I would reshuffle the order of the two-word phrases:
    * India ink
    * Land Mine
    * Sales Order
    * Color scheme
    * Property rights
    (There are three other equally valid reshufflings.)

    LegoRifflingOffShortz

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    1. I might argue that all 5! permutations are "equally" valid. For example, I might switch the second and third items in your list.

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    2. Paul, I would agree that the second and third items on my list could be switched. That is one of the three equally valid reshufflings.
      But I might counter-argue that, since one "card" must remain atop the "deck," we are dealing with not 5! but 4! permutations. And I believe, because of the three-tiered hierarchy inherent in the list, those 4! permutations must be divided by (3!)(2!).

      LegoConludesThat"SomeAnimalPairsAreMoreEqualThanOthers"(InTheNoahNarrativeAccordingToOrwell)

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    3. I must apologize to Paul. My posts above are based on a careless misspelling I committed. When Paul wrote, "I might switch the second and third items in your list," he was correct. Any "valid reshuffling" of Will's list must have "India ink" at the top and "Sales order" in second place. The remaining three items can fill out the list in any of six ways [because (3!)(2!)(1!) = 6]. Thus there are six (rather than four) "valid re-shufflings" of Will's random list. My bad spelling made me think that "Sales order" and "Land mine" were equivalent. They are not. "Land mine" must be relegated to the third, fourth or fifth position, just as "Color scheme" and "Property rights" must...

      Okay, there seems to be a measure of frustration with this puzzle. I have no idea who has solved it and who has not. That's because, as usual, I don't understand many comments and hints made by you Blainesvillians.
      I suspect jan, Paul, Blaine, Berf, cranberry, skydiveboy and 68Charger may have solved it, but I really don't know.
      I am 99.9% sure I have solved it. It took me until Sunday evening. It is one of those puzzles where when you solve it you say, "Of course!"... then kick yourself for not getting it sooner. I think it is a good puzzle.
      I'm not the world's best hinter, but I will try to give a hint now that may be somewhat helpful without being a giveaway:
      Each item contains at least one "red herring."

      LegoWhoHopesBlaineHasAlsoSolvedThePuzzleSoThatHeCanBlogAdministrikeHisPostIfItIsAGiveaway


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    4. Yes, I solved it Sunday morning. I will not be able to post at noon Thursday, as I normally do, because I will be out all day.

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    5. Umm, Lego, 3! = 6, 2! = 2, 1! = 1, so (3!)(2!)(1!) = 12, not 6. And there's cyclonic and anticyclonic. So, I'm not sure about the counting here. Are you looking for solutions to an NP-complete problem? I agree with the ``red herring'' comment. For a moment, I thought my friend Roy was on to something, but it didn't work out.

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    6. Thanks again for your math assistance, FloridaGuy. I was multiplying factorials for no discernible reason! What I should have said is, "The remaining three items can fill out the list in any of six ways (because 3! = (3)(2)(1) = 6). There are six different ways three items can be ordered: ABC, ACB. BAC, BCA, CAB and CBA.
      I shall now take a bit of a vacation from mathematics.

      LegoWhoIsGratefulToBothPaulAndFloridaGuy

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  14. Ross Beresford, who along with Magdalen, who used run the now defunct An Englishman Solves American Puzzles, would most likely say this puzzle meets with his approval, but probably say so somewhat differently.

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  15. I just sent in my answer. It seems ridiculous, but makes sense of Blaine's clue.

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  16. I missed the Perseid shower last month.

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    1. me too - too cloudy. :( --Margaret G.

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  17. Excuse me ladies and gentlemen, but I grow fatigued by this puzzle. I think I know how to solve it but feel it is not my cup of tea.

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    1. I liked the "radio silence" comment!

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    2. Thanks. It sure was a quiet Sunday morning.

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  18. 68Charger: I wonder if you really did solve it and are giving a clue. I gave up Sunday morning. Too difficult for me.

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    1. Natasha: Good to hear from you. I think I do have an answer but it could be better. But, no, no clue intended here. I just don't have the motivation to pursue another. I worked on this for a long time yesterday & today before coming across what I think is the route to the preferred answer. I just don't want to keep trying on this one. No clues intended, here!
      I will be looking forward to Thursday!

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    2. 68Charger: Good to get your message too. I hope you get the call from his majesty WS.

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  19. Lego - I’m disappointed that I didn’t make your list of this week’s solvers given my comment/clue above.

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    1. My sincere apologies, Snipper. I should have included you. Now that I re-read your Sun Sep 16, 08:49:00 AM PDT comment, I see that you embedded a very clever hint within the text, a hint that I was just too dull to perceive. As is too often the case when I read these Blainesville comments, I took it on face value and completely missed the brilliance. Sorry.

      LegoWhoOughtToRecognizeAndHonorHisFellowBlainsvillians'CreativityMoreReadily

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    2. Ditto here. After an hour of staring at the words the answer just jumped out, but was not feeling confident until Snipper’s “Hardly passes” clue my suspicions were confirmed.
      Here were my submissions, mostly random compounds as pointed out by others BTW, my weak attempt at hints were “OK OK” for now obvious reasons,”half cocked” for Hartford Connecticut and “dozen decent” for Dover Delaware since, for some reason at that time, thought perhaps only the first two letters from each word may not give away too much. Hey, am new at this posting clues thing!
      MONoxide ALarm
      MONster ALien
      LITigation ARbiter
      LIThograph ARt
      SACrilegious CArtoon
      DENture COrrection
      DENsity COefficient
      DENy COnsent
      DENim COlor
      TALk FLuently
      TALl FLame
      TALcum FLake

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  20. Danced around the answer for a while before finally coming up with the right steps.

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  21. This puzzle is driving me insane. I swear I had a dream last night about signing a sales order for property with Indian ink!

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    1. Same here, uk.

      But then denial comes in afterward. . .

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  22. Thanks Lego- and I appreciate the shrewd lambda’s contributions to this site!

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  23. I am reminded of a cave in Pennsylvania. --Margaret G.

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    1. The city where the cave is located is "Stalactite, PA", which just happens to anagram to "State Capital". As many have already pointed out, the first 3 letters in the first word are the beginning of the capital city, and the first 2 letters of the second word are the PO abbreviation for the corresponding state.

      My answers included Sacred Cause (Sacramento CA), Battery Lantern (Baton Rouge, LA), Monthly Allowance (Montgomery AL), Denim Comforter (Denver, CO), and Dove deoderant (Dover, DE). --Margaret G.

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  24. My bees ๐Ÿ are happy and busy.

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    1. Good for you. But one son of a bee flew right into my face while I was biking on Sunday, and then stung me to boot. (To be fair, it may have been a hornet; I didn't get his license plate.) My cheek is still swollen. My wife says I look like half a chipmunk. Fortunately, my patients have had the decency not to mention it.

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    2. Sorry about the flying, stinging critter. Our bees are so docile; just busy with that “honey do” list.

      I’d put money on a hornet, or other eusocial wasp, to have altered your cheek structure.

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    3. I didn't know you kept bees. Did you know about the two hives on the roof of the NPR building in DC? They're named "All Stings Considered" and "Swarming Edition".

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    4. Yes, we have two hives that are producing several gallons of honey this summer. They are quite entertaining to watch. No names for the hives here yet, though.

      The oddest part is the honey tastes like orange blossoms.

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    5. There is also a third hive named, "Wait Wait ... Don't Bore Me!"

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    6. How wonderful — I would love to have a honey hive!

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    7. SDB: your comment sounds like something a wasp would say.

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    8. eco, what’s the buzz ๐Ÿ on where you’ve been?

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    9. I am a WASP. I used to be anyway.

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    10. WW: thanks for asking, my week has just been a-pollen, see my response to Curtis below.

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    11. Glad you are still among us, buzzing about. Everyone I know has had a buzzy �� week.

      I was going in many directions here also; we are still trying to get our international students here from Nigeria and Afghanistan.

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  25. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    1. It was a great post; just too revealing until the deadline tomorrow.

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  26. The reason folks down in New Orleans put up those levees is because they can bayou some time.

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  27. I played on the air back in December (I was the one who waited to buy a dictionary in case I got to play on the air and win one). I discovered Blaine's puzzle blog in the last year as well and am glad to see others like to solve the NPR puzzle. This is my first time posting, so ...salutations!

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    1. Welcome to Blainesville, Markio... and salutations backatcha.
      We all know NPR no longer doles out dictionaries (just games, puzzle books and the "coveted" lapel pin), but did they make an exception in your case and spring for one?

      LegoWhoWouldAlwaysOptForLexiconsOnTheLapOverLapelPinsOnTheTux!

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  28. I am discombobulated. Vacation days Monday and Tuesday, worked today(Wednesday) when I am usually off. Vacation days Thursday and Friday. Thought the answer needed to be Wednesday at 3:00, I got nothing and I am walking away. Cannot wait for Thursday(is that tomorrow?) to paste an L on my forehead.

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    1. Liz, here’s to Combobulation Thursday!

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    2. And no L necessary, btw. This was very tricky.

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    3. Really busy week at work, with little brain power left for puzzles. I'm discombobulated, too, and not submitting an answer for the second week in a row, which is a first for me.

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    4. I came up with a solution on Sunday, but couldn't connect that with the clues given, so I dropped it. Also, I am madly trying to get some projects submitted before the next round of projects start tomorrow.

      I am not submitting for the +/-1,560th week in a row. Except a couple of times for creative challenges.

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  30. It is now Thursday and as the clock ticks down to 3:00 and the great reveal, I am begging someone to post a not-quite-tmi-but-close hint to the commonality. I can't let this puzzle beat me!

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    1. Vote out the red. Re-elect the BLUE.

      IAmLegoLambdaAndIThinkIApproveOfThisMessageButIAmNotSureThatOurBlogAdministratorWill

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  32. not only did I not get to first base I didn't make it out of the batter's box. Usually solve puzzle using a excel spreadsheet and occasionally optimization. that won't work when it comes to reading Will's (alleged) mind. I will sleep though Weekend Edition Sunday and forget I ever saw this puzzle. Curse you Red Baron

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  33. The first words have the first 3 or more letters of a state capital. The second words begin with the 2 letter postal code of that state.

    ● Property rights >>> Providence, RI
    ● Land mine >>> Lansing, MI
    ● Sales order >>> Salem, OR
    ● Color scheme >>> Columbia, SC
    ● India ink >>> Indianapolis, IN

    MY OFFERINGS:

    ● Sacajawea's campfire >>> Sacramento, CA
    ● Olympics Walking >>> Olympia, WA
    ● Linoleum neglect >>> Lincoln, NE
    ● Talented flamingos >>> Tallahassee, FL
    ● PhแปŸ azure >>> Phoenix, AZ

    My Hint:

    “Ross Beresford, who along with Magdalen, who used run the now defunct An Englishman Solves American Puzzles, would most likely say this puzzle meets with his approval, but probably say so somewhat differently.”

    It has now gone somewhat out of style, but the Brits used to use "capital" as a synonym for excellent or marvelous. "I say! That's a capital idea."

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  34. The first 3 letters (of the first word) are the start a state capital and the first 2 letters (of the second word) are the state postal code.
    PROperty RIghts --> PROvidence, RI
    LANd MIne --> LANsing, MI
    SALes ORder --> SALem, OR
    COLor SCheme --> COLumbia, SCINDia INk --> INDianapolis, IN

    A few possible phrases that also work:BOSs MAn / BOSun's MAte --> BOSton, MA
    COLlege SCholarship --> COLumbia, SC
    DENtal COverage --> DENver, CO
    HARbor PAtrol / HARem PAnts --> HARrisburg, PA
    INDefinite INtegral --> INDianapolis, IN
    LINgual NErve --> LINcoln, NE
    LITerary ARts --> LITtle Rock, AR
    MADeira WIne --> MADison, WI
    PROmise RIng --> PROvidence, RI
    RICkets VAccine --> RIChmond, VA
    SACral CAnal / SACred CAbal --> SACramento, CA

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  35. The first two letters of the second word of each phrase is a US state postal abbreviation. The first three letters of the first word are the first three letters of the state capital.

    > WW, is your brother a runner?

    Last week, Word Woman mentioned that her brother lived in Cambridge. I was wondering whether he ran in the BOSton MArathon. (BOSton MAssacre and BOSs MAn also work.)

    > It's on the tip of my tongue... and the roof of my mouth.

    That's where you find the LINgual NErve, and the HARd PAlate.

    > How about the CAPitol STeps?

    Echoes Blaine's clue.

    > I missed the Perseid shower last month.

    AUGust MEteors

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    1. Here are some of my rejected ideas:
      ATLas GAmes
      AUGmented MEmory
      BATch LAnguage
      BAThing LAke
      BATtle LAnd
      DENse COre
      HARd PAlate
      HONest HIstory
      HONey HIll
      INDelible INk
      INDex INvesting
      LITerary ARgument
      MONitor ALarm
      MONocase ALphabet
      PHOny AZalea
      PROduct RIsk
      PROtein RIch
      RICe VAlley
      RICh VAluation
      TALl FLame

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    2. My list of 48 phrases included only those on the Moby Word List file of compound words.

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  36. In no particular order:
    MONTHLY ALLOWANCE
    DENY COLLUSION
    OLYMPIC WALKING
    SACRED CATTLE
    HARRISON PAEAN

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    1. I thought about contriving some story involving a route connecting all the answers I thought of, but I never got around to developing SAID MNEMONIC, and thus forgot a few.

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    2. A few possibilities I noticed no one else came up with:
      SEARCH WARRANT(Seattle, Washington)
      SAND CASTLE(San Diego, Francisco, Mateo, Santa Barbara, etc., California)
      TALKING ALOUD(Talladega, Alabama)
      And of course, the five I mentioned in a previous post:
      LOST CAUSE(Los Angeles, California)
      PITY PARTY(Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania)
      WILL DECIDED(Wilmington, Delaware)
      GLEN CAMPBELL(Glendale, California)
      DENNIS COFFEY(Denver, Colorado)
      And, come to think of it, JASON ALDEAN(Jasper, Alabama). How did I miss that one?
      Also, CHARLES SCHULZ(Charleston, South Carolina).
      And CORN FLAKES(Coral Gables, Florida).
      And I just now realized they're supposed to be the state capitals, but I just went with any city in that state. Seems to be a lot of possibilities whether it's the capital or not, wouldn't you say?
      First three or more letters in first word=State Capital
      First two in second word=State Postal Abbreviation
      You get up early on a Sunday morning, you're probably still sleepy enough to sometimes miss little details like that. Sorry.


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  38. The first 3 or more letters of the first word are the first 3 or more letters of a state capital. The first 2 letters of the second word are the postal abbreviation of the corresponding state. Hence:

    *Property rights >>> Providence, RI
    *Land mine >>> Lansing, MI
    *Sales order >>> Salem, OR
    *Color scheme >>> Columbia, SC
    *India ink >>> Indianapolis, IN


    “My bees are happy and busy.” HONey HIves >>> Honolulu, Hawaii

    “I’d put money on a hornet, or other eusocial wasp, to have altered your cheek structure.” >>> MONey ALtar/alter >>> Montgomery, Alabama. 

    But, then DENial COmes in afterwards. . .” >>> Denver, Colorado

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  39. Replies
    1. You post came before the deadline and the four hinted-phrases were deliberately spaced to each be on a new line which I felt didn't do much to obfuscate them.

      Here's what your wrote,
      The
      Hard part while
      Talking flirtatiously with this girl
      (Honey hips) was trying to look cool in my
      Denim coat

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    2. Ahh I understand. Thank you for responding!

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  40. Jasmine Choi is a TALented FLutist.

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  41. Is this an obsession, or a SACred CAlling?

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  42. I had my say Sunday about "something in common" Shortz puzzles.
    I think there are about sixteen states whose two-letter abbreviations may never start words,
    Out of the remaining ones a few rarely do, but the rest provide hundreds of possible phrases that match Willy's.
    Isn't that a boisterous idea?

    Another idea is to present this challenge and answer to some of your friends who question your addiction to this weekly endeavor. Did it change their minds?

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  44. My hints explained:
    Vote out the red. Re-elect the BLUE.
    Politically, red means "right" and blue means "left."
    "Voting out," or eliminating, letters at the right ends of both words in each phrase while "keeping in office" the letters at the left in place will eliminate the letters you ought to ignore. For example, ditch the "or" at the end of "Color" and the "heme" at the end of "scheme" and you are left with Col and sc, which might help you see "Columbia, South Carolina." BLUE is in capital letters because "Col" is the beginning of a state capital, and postal abbreviations like SC are written in capital letters.
    Each item contains at least one "red herring."
    red herrings = "misleading letters"
    The one misleading letter in "India ink," for example is the "k". It does not appear in "Indianapolis, IN." The "red-herring" letters in "Land mine" are "d", "n", and "e".
    All my nonsense about reshuffling the order of the two-word phrases to read:
    * INDIA INk (7)
    * SALEs ORder (6)
    * LANd MIne (5)
    * COLor SCheme (5)
    * PROperty RIghts (5)
    was just a ranking based on which phrases contained the most non-misleading letters (which is given above in parentheses after each two-word phrase).

    Lego(MadcapWitWhoIsStudyingzMnemonics)

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    1. Very interesting. That is indeed the ordering principle I was thinking of when I suggested the change (although I might have described it a bit differently (and less efficiently)).
      However, when I first looked at your original list, I immediately noticed it was narrow at the top and broad at the bottom:
      * India ink
      * Land Mine
      * Sales Order
      * Color scheme
      * Property rights

      INDIA INK may be skinnier than LAND MINE, but it has the same number of letters, so I also thought about suggesting a switch between those two, with the bottom three required to remain in their original positions.
      Of course, they could be listed alphabetically or according to some geographic paradigm relating to the associated cities.

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    3. Lego and Paul, I thought you were going for another ordering principle, namely the shortest way to visit all five capitals and return to the start. Of course, you can start at any of the cities, and, given a circuit, go around in either of two directions. I think states for the shortest circuit, arbitrarily starting with MI, is MI, OR, IN, SC, RI, MI. This is sort of counter-clockwise. Or you could do it clockwise. Hence my cyclonic/anticyclonic comment. The general problem of finding such a shortest tour given any number of cities to visit is known as the Traveling Salesman Problem. This is an NP-complete problem, which essentially means that it's really hard to solve once the number of cities is large enough, like 50. Here, it turns out there are only 12 circuits you need to check, so it's pretty easy.

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  45. Blaine, I was the one who mentioned that the answer involves a certain category with a certain number of ... items. I was trying to merely hint at the 50 states without giving it away. Was 48 just too close to the number 50, or did Jan's reply (which I never even got to read!), blow it for both of us?

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    1. The main concern I had with that exchange was the focus on looking for categories much like the planets in the prior puzzle. I felt that was too revealing.

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  46. Well I was way off base this week. Good puzzle.

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  47. Good work for all of you who got this one! Two weeks in a row I have failed!

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  48. My clues -

    HARdly PAsses for a real puzzle was reference to Harrisburg PA.
    My reply to Lego - “a shrewd Lamda” was reference to Shreveport Louisiana though not the capital.

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  49. I find it remarkable how quickly and consistently Blaine comes up with these answers each week, makes a graphic, gives a hint, and uploads our Sunday morning playground!
    I realize a handful of other Blainesvillians get these answers consistently quickly also (skydiveboy, for example, is legendary for solving the puzzle while still wearing his nightcap, sleeping mask and pajamas!) but Blaine is under a lot of pressure to produce.
    Thanks, Blaine. We don't say it enough.

    LegoWhoOversleepsSundayMorningsBecauseHeTakesNipsOfBoozyNightcapsSaturdayNightBeforeSlippingUnderTheCovers

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    1. This one wasn't easy, but Sales Order was the one that made me think Salem Oregon. That was after going down lots of dead ends like anagrams, 'property' being only the top row of a typewriter, etc.

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    2. Lego - Well said! Thank you Blaine.

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    3. Blaine, when I tried the "top-row-of-the-typewriter" ploy on "PROPERTY," my heart skipped a happy beat... After that, it just went back to beating in its old doldrummy glum lub-dub lub-dub lub-dub...

      LegoWhoseHeartSkippedAGradeWhenHeWasAKid...BoyDidThatSmart!

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    4. I'm in awe of Blaine's quick answers, too! I didn't get this one until Tuesday. --Margaret G.

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  50. For those who want a second chance at (or a second helping of) this type of puzzle, here is one of three Riffing Off Shortz entrees we will be serving up on Puzzleria! early tomorrow morning
    These five 2-word phrases have something reasonably unusual in common. What is it? When you find it, think of another two-word phrase that has the same property.
    Tiny Lilliputians
    Assail Hades!
    Sales order
    Parcheesi rival
    Blurry snapshot

    (If you get the answer you can give hints here or on Puzzleria! We reveal answers on Puzzleria! on Wednesday at noon Pacific Time.)
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    LegoWhoCautionsThat"ParcheesiRival"HasNothingToDoWithPennsylvaniaOrRhodeIsland

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    1. Would you believe I just now figured out the answer to those phrases, Lego? Second idea that came to me! Extra phrase: Secret Santa

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    2. Yes, I would believe that, cranberry, and I believe in Santa too! Congrats. You are already ahead of the Puzzleria! game for this coming week!

      LegoThinks"SecretSanta"IsAnExcellentTwoWordPhraseWithTheSameProperty

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  51. I made the mistake of getting too complicated. I said that the phrases had two meanings, depending on whether you counted the second word in the phrase as a noun or a verb.

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    1. Thanks, I was going with all the words were nouns, but the first words were being used as adjectives and then I had a brain freeze.

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