Sunday, November 11, 2018

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Nov 11, 2018): Synonymous Four-Word Phrase

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Nov 11, 2018): Synonymous Four-Word Phrase:
Q: This challenge is easy, but elegant. Think of a familiar four-word phrase that means "to be last." Together the first two words are a synonym for the last word. What phrase is it?
If you take the initial letter of each word, change the last letter to two later in the alphabet, you get another synonym for the last word.

Edit: Butt
A: BRING UP THE REAR

121 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Unused clues from this week's On-air challenge:

    I'm going to give you some sentences. Each sentence has two blanks. Add the letters "-ty" to the end of the word that goes in the first blank so phonetically you'll get a new word that goes in the second blank to complete the sentence.
    Example: Someone is liable to ________ on the newly laid steps due to the ________ workmanship. –-> FALL, FAULTY
    3. The witch ________ a high, pointed, wide-brimmed hat over her ________ face.

    6. Supporting the bridge was a steel ________, which the railroad company felt was ________ enough to carry its fully loaded trains.

    8. It should surely ________ at your conscience if you do something ________ to a helpless person.

    10. The little ________ from Copenhagen had such ________ fingers.

    11. With his riches and fame, the magnate used to be on top of the world, but now, oh, ________, how the ________ have fallen!

    As usual please don't post the answers till Thursday so everyone has a chance to solve.

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    Replies
    1. Some bonus On-Air challenges that WS was too afraid to say:

      13. Unlike Ralph Kramden, who had a mighty ________ when he laughed, Agent Orange does not have a ________ sense of humor.

      14. Making sure there wasn't a single ________ left was what he wanted in an environmental ________.

      15. A little ________ on the grass was all it took to keep the snowflake from performing his ceremonial ________.

      16. Letting the Dictator run rampant was ________ for the course for the corrupt ________.

      17. The autocrat would ________ nothing for anyone who didn't have total ________ towards him.

      18. "You can't impeach me for trying to ________ every underage Miss Teen Pageant contestant that I see in the dressing room! That's merely a ________ crime!"

      19. He threw the skinny aide under the ________ because she wasn't ________ enough.

      20. After going through the looking glass he had egg on his face from trying to ________ ________.

      21. The audience let out a roaring ________ when they saw the tape of the fat man getting some ________ from the Russian prostitutes.

      22. The porn star ________ her tongue to keep from laughing when she saw what a little ________ "man" he was.

      23. The convicted traitor didn't think it was ________ when they seized all his ________.

      Can you find the theme here?

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    2. Answers to the On Air Challenge Unused clues.

      3. The witch ________ a high, pointed, wide-brimmed hat over her ________ face. → Wore Warty

      6. Supporting the bridge was a steel ________, which the railroad company felt was ________ enough to carry its fully loaded trains. → Truss, trusty

      8. It should surely ________ at your conscience if you do something ________ to a helpless person. → Gnaw, Naughty

      10. The little ________ from Copenhagen had such ________ fingers. → Dane, dainty

      11. With his riches and fame, the magnate used to be on top of the world, but now, oh, ________, how the ________ have fallen! → My, Mighty.

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  3. Having passed on my non-athletic genes, my children are also familiar with this phrase.

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  4. Sounds like Lorraine Hansberry.

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  5. Remove the first letter from the first and last words, reverse those words, and the result is something many people want. And something even more people don't want.

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  6. Barnstable, Massachusetts, the largest community on Cape Cod

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    Replies
    1. A village, a town, and a county!

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    2. A portion of which was "transferred" from the Wampanoags to English colonizers in exchange for a brass kettle. That part of town is now home to many million-dollar houses and a Cape Cod Baseball League team whose nickname, the Kettleers, commemorates the thef-, uh, transaction.

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    3. jsulbyrne, thanks for the scoop on that "transference." I did not know about the brass kettle, nor the Kettleers, though I did often swim the length of Sheep Pond, two connected kettle ponds in nearby Brewster, MA. About halfway across the pond, it gets so shallow your hand hits the bottom. That is where they used to shepherd sheep in between the ponds (according to the morning Brewster General Store crew, anyway). No word from the local brass, though.

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    4. Enough of all this talk about sheep dip. Or were you just pondering?

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    5. Pondering away >>>

      https://youtu.be/La51wxJ-ixs

      Delete
  7. Praise be, I have two answers...

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  8. Rearrange the letters in the first synonym and you get something rude.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rearrange the letters in all the words to get a rude non-alien.

      Delete
    2. If you're not too particular about taxonomy, semantics, or pronunciation, a "wascally wabbit" is a PERTURBING HARE, which is an anagram of ... something.

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  9. I ultimately expect Will to be raising the bar on these challenges starting next week. Additional clue:

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  10. Movie clue: Blazing Saddles
    BTW I’ve noticed the same odd thing about this phrase.

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  11. Jane, of the most famous dozen.

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  12. I posted this at PEOTS:

    https://wordwomanpartialellipsisofthesun.blogspot.com/2018/10/clock-this-dandelion-seeds-have-vortex.html

    but it works here, too >>>

    “Giant thunderclap at dawn” >>>

    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/early-giant-fossils-shows-how-dinos-went-two-legs-four-180970423/

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  13. 458 responses for monokini?
    DJT interns there?

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  14. Certain Brazilian surgeons might be familiar with this phrase...


    On a hopeful note, isn't it nice that 'they' (NPR puzzle scribes?) seem to have eliminated the tacky, forced, presumptuous, groan-inducing 'seasonal' segues that have sullied the puzzle's introduction segments for so long? I am very happy with the dry, matter-of-fact style that our host has lately adopted. Haven't seen anyone here mention it, but it wasn't so long ago that we'd have to endure something like this:

    *bouncy piano music*

    LULU: Today is Veteran's Day...but here at NPR we know the only war worth fighting is the one going on inside your own brain. So, before you head out to your local military parade, grab a cup of strong coffee and a sharp pencil because it's time to play...the puzzle!

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  15. I predict there'll be about a gazillion right answers this week.

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  16. I think this is a census day puzzle.

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  17. Tangerines exchanged for wild pine mushrooms in the Korean peninsula? There’s gotta be a joke in there somewhere.

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  18. Replies
    1. Clark, I might have gone with admirable.

      eco, Mendo Jim, and others near the CA fires—any more reports from your locales?

      Delete
    2. This is being petty so it may not warrant a reply.

      A big salute to our vets!

      Delete
    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    4. Thanks for asking WW.

      I can't say I'm near the Camp fire, it's about 200 miles away. But the winds have been from the north and east, blowing the smoke to the Bay Area. Our area quality is merely unhealthy, 160 or so for particulates. Similar to Beijing. Much better than Friday, where the smoke was thick enough that the sun was an orange glow, you could stare at it directly. But there's definitely a smokey smell everywhere.

      Mendo Jim is about twice as close, and the wind has been blowing more towards his direction, www.airnow.gov shows that air as very unhealthy, much better than the hazardous they had earlier.

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    5. Thanks for the update and that airnow.gov site, eco. Data! “Near” is all in one’s perspective, eh?

      I echo Renople’s salute to our vets. This interchange between Pete Davidson and Dan Crenshaw on SNL was quite moving to me. Seeing Mr. Crenshaw reaching out to understand the pain AND humor in Mr. Davidson was quite genuine. We need to see where the other person has been; forgiveness comes more easily so we can move forward:

      https://youtu.be/GKaakjMVtyE

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    6. This is the fourth Northern California city to basically burn down in the last few years, not to mention the huge forest fire that burned nearly all of the Mendocino National Forest in August.
      That was forest not houses and it started a half mile from my house and burned away (east) for weeks).
      It never produced the staggering atmospherics that we are just getting over.
      Thursday was really scary and exciting both.
      I think the smoke has acted like a cloud cover, keeping temperatures down during the day and allowing freezing ones at night: 22 degrees this morning, a record for the date.
      It is hard to attribute all of it to climate change, but not to as well.
      Rain, please.

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    7. Re: forgiveness
      Which first comes to mind?
      a) debts
      b) sins
      c) trespasses
      d) none of the above
      Data!

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    8. Divinity. Followed closely by letting go of the past.

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    9. So, is Divinity the Future?

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    10. Hmmm, well most would argue divinity is past, present AND future. But I was mostly referencing that once forgiveness is asked or given it should never be brought up again to cause shame.

      Delete
    11. Re: I am glad you did not fudge that answer.

      Paul, to add to your database, put me down for d).

      Delete
  19. I am thinking if I get some body work done, I may have a chance in the industry. Does anybody know who did Kanye's butt lift?

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  20. Does anyone remember this puzzle was used once before? Last weeks Monokini was also a rerun.

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    Replies
    1. Al, I don’t remember this puzzle from a previous time. I recall the whole maillots (pronunciation) fiasco, which is close, but no monokini.

      Delete
    2. One can do a search for previous puzzles on this site on the "search this blog" location on upper right of this blog. I did not find any similar puzzle used before.

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    3. They may go back a long time ago, 1998 or older.

      Delete
  21. For those who think they still have (or want) a grip on reality, this advertisement will quickly dispense with that feeble notion.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Be sure to keep your receipt, this product can come back to bite you!

      Delete
    2. I trust the Lou Ferrigno as The Incredible Hulk was to honor the late Stan Lee?

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    3. Kinda, I mainly liked the idea of giving that dang bear the boot!!
      Fortunately, I have not seen that stupid bear in real life. Somebody must be buying them, though.

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    4. You bet! I got a discount for ordering a dozen.

      Delete
    5. If it had a Russian flag that unzipped from its tuchas I would buy it in a second.

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    6. I took your advice and purchased ursine of our times.

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    7. Calling all tan gents: that reminds me that I’ve meant to ask “What’s your sine?”

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    8. After legalization I can proudly carry one that says "High, pot in use!"

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    9. OMFG! I thought that was a parody until I looked up the site.

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    10. Just saw this a little while ago:

      Here is another "must buy" toy for the upcoming season.

      Delete
    11. It says $29.95, but isn't there some way we can get Mexico to pay for it?

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    12. Tried to spy on the box where these blocks are made. Am not sure if these are re-purposed LEGO brand blocks, which are made in Sweden, Hungary, Mexico and China.

      Delete
  22. Interesting how the revolving door at the White House seems to be getting oiled up for what appears to be its imminent use.

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    Replies
    1. And amusing that it's Melania who decides who should be on the National Security Team. But she's probably the one who attends the meetings.

      DT meets the attends, that's where he gets his briefs.

      Delete
  23. BRING UP THE REAR >>> BRING UP, REAR

    “Barnstable, Massachusetts, the largest community on Cape Cod” was a nod to T. Berry Brazelton, who wrote books on child REARing and died this year at age 99 in Barnstable, MA. It also pointed to a horse REARing up in a barn.

    “Just listen to NPR. . .” NPR was airing a piece on child REARing, including spanking, soon after the Sunday puzzle.

    The dinosaur post, including the PEOTS link, is pointing to Bringing up Baby, a film featuring Cary Grant as a paleontologist.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Bring up the rear
    Remove the first letter from the first and last words, reverse those words, and the result is something many people want (earring). And something even more people don't want (ear ring) or tinnitus, except when it's the the bells, bells, bells, bells, bells, bells, bells. Poe sense of humor.

    Bonus Answers

    13. Unlike Ralph Kramden, who had a mighty har when he laughed, Agent Orange does not have a hearty sense of humor.

    14. Making sure there wasn't a single tree left was what he wanted in an environmental treaty.

    15. A little dew on the grass was all it took to keep the snowflake from performing his ceremonial duty. (my third favorite)

    16. Letting the Dictator run rampant was par for the course for the corrupt party.

    17. The autocrat would feel nothing for anyone who didn't have total fealty towards him.

    18. "You can't impeach me for trying to pet every underage Miss Teen Pageant contestant that I see in the dressing room! That's merely a petty crime!" (my second favorite)

    19. He threw the skinny aide under the bus because she wasn't busty enough.

    20. After going through the looking glass he had egg on his face from trying to hump Humpty. (that's just gross)

    21. The audience let out a roaring boo when they saw the tape of the fat man getting some booty from the Russian prostitutes.

    22. The porn star bit her tongue to keep from laughing when she saw what a little bitty "man" he was. (my favorite)

    23. The convicted traitor didn't think it was proper when they seized all his property.

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  25. 1. BRING UP THE REAR.

    BRING UP = REAR.

    2. If you “place last,” you COME IN LAST PLACE.

    COME IN = PLACE.

    My hint “Praise” (- P) = raise = bring up = rear.

    Blaine's hint: “Abbot” → a “butt” = “rear”

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ron, That was not my interpretation of Blaine's hint. How did you get Abbot? I got: bring up the rear= butt (r=t).

      Delete
    2. Phonetically, abbot "a butt."

      Delete
  26. "How much are we paying the PM?"
    If this puzzle is Will's way of asking for a raise ... smh.

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  27. Can someone tell me what Berf's! Giveaway at the end of last weeks contest was?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Berf has left a new comment on the post "NPR Sunday Puzzle (Nov 4, 2018): What Shall I Wear...":

      If I said it's inelegant, would I be an ass?

      Delete
  28. Bring up the rear or bringing up the rear

    My Hint:

    "And how is Father anyway?"
    Referring to 1946 TV show, Bringing Up Father.

    I'm late today. Trying to buy a car with the usual glitches with the paperwork.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wait, you can't get rid of the Grand Marquis????

      Almost 8 years ago the NYT wrote "The Grand Marquis is the last of its kind, a relic of a past not that long past. It’s the final full-size, full-frame, nonluxury American sedan with V-8 power, rear drive and a solid rear axle that is available for retail sale to the general public."

      Seems like it's your duty to hold on to relics of America's past, like democracy.

      Delete
    2. If you did get rid of the ol' Grand Marquis, how many miles did you finally put on it?

      Delete
  29. Bring up the rear.
    My reference to my children sharing my lack of athletic ability is a reference to child rearing.

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  30. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    Replies
    1. I am getting a Crown Victoria LX Sport. It is the same car as the Grand Marquis, and the Town Car is the same car too except for a few minor cosmetic changes.

      My 2002 Grand Marquis has 128+K. It still runs as smooth as day one. It does not use a drop of oil. I intended to keep it, but this CV is a 2006 one owner car the 92 year old is selling because he quit driving. It was garaged and his grandson owns car a repair business and the maintenance was done along the way. No accidents and since I am getting a great price and they don't make them anymore it is what I believe to be a shrewd move. Great color too! I will sell the G.M.

      Delete
    2. Those are nice looking cars, sounds like a good decision to me!
      I'm still amazed at how much better cars are compared to 20-50 years ago.

      Delete
  31. My clues:
    “I ultimately expect Will to be raising the bar....” was reference to “raising” or “rearing”.
    My Additional clue: was a colon (punctuation) as a reference to the body part !

    ReplyDelete
  32. BRING UP THE REAR, BRING UP, REAR
    In "Blazing Saddles", Black Bart tells the Waco Kid the story of when he was younger and his family was part of a wagon train heading west, but they were actually behind everyone else. So he said, "You might say we was bringin' up the rear."
    On "Mama's Family", Thelma Harper's daughter Ellen was in the hospital, but no one else knew the real reason why. Ellen only told Thelma why: She was having plastic surgery on her butt. At the end of the episode, Thelma told everyone else, "You know how Ellen was always first in everything? Well, now she's bringing up the rear."
    I also considered sending in this idea as a Sunday Puzzle challenge myself, but I don't remember if I ever did or not. And they've said it's already been done before. Oh well.

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  33. Replies
    1. Why? Because it was involved in fowl play.

      Canon fodder, or canon feather?

      Delete
    2. Until now I have always been comfortable with my preferring Pachelbel over Taco Bell.

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    3. I want to listen to a quartet featuring an English Horn, French Horn, Foghorn, and Leghorn.

      Delete
    4. If you happen to miss the performance, perhaps it will be reported on by Martha Gellhorn.

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    5. Can't tell a castrato from a capon.

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    6. Yeah, no competition for Alessandro Moreschi, even when he didn't have a cape on.

      Delete
  34. I think it is important that the Press has the freedom to report on all the wonderful things Trump is doing, but I see no reason to extend this right.

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    Replies
    1. I am still trying to find the identity of the White House aide who tried to grab the microphone from CNN's Accosta.

      Delete
  35. This week's challenge: In my trip to Europe two weeks ago I visited a friend in Amsterdam, Peter Ritmeester, who literally has a puzzle on his doormat. Before you walk into his apartment, there's an original puzzle for you to solve. I was able to do it. See if you can. What number comes next in this series: 1 2 4 8 16 23 28 ??

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oops! The NPR website includes the answer to this challenge, which I've omitted here, hoping it will disappear soon.

      Delete
    2. That’s got to be embarrassing...

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    3. Old English IS another way to go.

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    4. The deadline is also listed as last week. So I'm not sure what is up.

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    5. The new puzzle page is gone now.

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    6. Grumble, grumble, grumble....

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    7. Over 1500 entries last week. On air, Lulu said the deadline for entries is Thursday at 3:00 ET, so maybe the intern who posted the answer will be punished by working on Thanksgiving?

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    8. 7:51am ...and it's back up on the website.

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    9. Sans answer.

      “Original puzzle” though?

      Delete
  36. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    Replies
    1. I don’t think Will can do that . . .;-)

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    2. WS can't Google, Bing, DuckDuckGo, Startpage...??

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    3. MC, I agree with you. Hence, my “original puzzle?”

      I was making a joke on the directive “Will (,) delete this post in 30 min.”

      Delete
  37. Replies
    1. MC, no worries. The puzzle, the entry deadline, the answer published this week—perhaps a little levity can combat this week’s dumpster fire.

      While it may be “original” to put the number sequence on a doormat, it is far, far from original.

      Delete
  38. would 49 be the next number after the answer to the puzzle?

    ReplyDelete