Sunday, January 20, 2019

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jan 20, 2019): What a Feeling

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jan 20, 2019): What a Feeling:
Q: Take the name of a classic song that became the signature song of the artist who performed it. It has two words; five letters in the first, three letters in the second. The letters can be rearranged to spell two new words. One is a feeling. The other is an expression of that feeling. What song is it?
Alternatively, you can rearrange the letters to spell two items that can be eaten.

Edit: The two foods are MANNA and POI.
A: Billy Joel's PIANO MAN --> PAIN, MOAN

141 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. Ack! Blaine took my hint away. For an answer, ask Bill, John, Paul, or David.

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    Replies
    1. I just read jan's comment at the end of last week's post. I guess we all independently had the same idea.

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    2. I have no idea what any of you are talking about.

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    3. "No great mind chooses to make anagrams" - the new motto of STRAP.

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    4. Yes, Blaine, and I think it may have been Heaven sent.

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  3. How does that phrase go...? Half a day late and a dollar short?

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    Replies
    1. I believe it's, a day late, and a dollar short.

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    2. The puzzle was posted almost exactly a half day from "Nine o'clock on a Saturday..."

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  4. Easy puzzle. I’m sure the artist’s offspring would echo that sentiment.

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  5. The ultimate concert would feature The Monkees with The Village People.

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  6. Coincidentally, the feeling and expression are what I experience whenever I come across this artist...

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    Replies
    1. You may be right, if we have the same answer.

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    2. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    3. Anyone want to bet BB gets blog administered?

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  7. As a curiosity, WONDERWALL by Oasis anagrams to DWELL ON WAR...

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    Replies
    1. That's WONDERWALL → DWELL ON WAR with Congress.

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  8. The one question I keep asking myself on this blog is, "What are you doing here?"

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  9. Got it quickly. This artist was my first concert and I have a theory that in this artist's home area (also my home area), at any given time, there is a radio station playing one of his/her songs.

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  10. I should have figured this one out last night around bed time.

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  11. In the midst of planning my second spring trip to Bentonville, Arkansas with my mom.

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  12. "a classic song..." is open to interpretation.
    Those who have been solving Puzzleria! puzzles in the past month or so may be experiencing a tinge of deja vu as they solve this week's NPR puzzle.
    For STRAP members and other in favor of repealing anagram puzzles, here is a non-anagram puzzle currently appearing on Puzzleria! that should be a snap for Blainsvillians to solve:
    Name a nationally broadcast weekly show, in three words.The first and last names of a person featured on the broadcast begin with the initial letters of the first and third words in the broadcast’s name. The initial letter of the person’s college degree is the same as the initial letter of the broadcast’s second word. What is the name of this broadcast? What is the name of this person?
    For those who do like anagram puzzles, here is one on the current Puzzleria! that is more challenging than this week's "signature song" puzzle:
    Name what famished people would do – in a phrase of two 6-letter words beginning with D and H – if they took a certain facetious hyperbolic expression literally. Rearrange these 12 letters to form more suitable consumables for the famished. What consumables are these?
    Give hints if you solve either of these, but please post no answers until Wednesday afternoon.

    LegoLePetitDejeunerVacuum

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Speaking of vacuums—cosmic thought of the day (that doesn’t suck): when you are cleaning out the vacuum cleaner intake, you become the vacuum cleaner.

      Delete
    2. Speaking of cosmic thoughts, I hope everyone can view tonight's lunar eclipse. The one last year was pretty cool, here's a photo I took. Not as astonishing as a solar eclipse, but it's easy to see anywhere in the US. Next one won't be until 2022 in North America.

      Rain in the Bay Area might cloud the experience.

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    3. If a vacuum is a place with nothing in it, why would you need to clean it?

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    4. Nice image of the recent lunar eclipse, eco. Snow clouds may roll in later tonight obscuring our view. It was gorgeous and sunny on our walk today, though.

      Good question, SuperZee-san.

      Delete
    5. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    6. WW - Would that make me SuperZen, or ZenZee?

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  13. Easy to get the song but not as easy to anagram it.

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  14. Very simple to solve with a list. So why won't Will Shortz use the puzzles I send him that he says are really good, but refuses to use because he says he tries not to use puzzles that can be solved with a list?

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  15. There is a famous signature song in 2 words, 5 & 3, that when anagrammed into 2 other words evokes a feeling opposite of the one expressed in the ballad. Can you figure this one out?

    Hint: If you hate anagrams, you can think of it as a form of Spoonerism.

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  16. This is a model puzzle. Or at least it was at one time.

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  17. The artist reminds me of an activity often done in late summer/early fall. --Margaret G.

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  18. In the middle of an argument with Lois, the answer came to me.

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  19. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  20. Well, I solved it by going through my LP collection while drinking alone, but must admit first got hung up with a pelvic “Dough Nod”

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  21. The way to solve anagram puzzles is to look them up on the internet.
    How often does anyone eat either of the two foods?

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    Replies
    1. “I did it my waaaaay”... Sunday mornings are about thinking through potential solutions to the puzzl on my own. Sunday evenings are looking at the clues from this blog. And Mondays are about the Internet.

      And those foods are not on my diet.

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  22. According to Webster, the expression can be for a different feeling.

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  23. Reverse of Petula Clark'signature song to get in artist's zip code (later left).

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  24. Don't know much about electrochemistry ...

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    Replies
    1. ... but I think it involves AMPs and ANIONs.

      So, what about the edibles? ONION doesn't work. I don't know what POI tastes like, but I've heard of it. But ANMAN? What could that be? Wait a minute, what's this stuff in my jar?

      Delete
  25. Replies
    1. ron:
      That first cartoon reminded me to ask if anyone knows if you can get drunk swimming in Lake Mead?

      Delete
    2. No, but you might have a honey of a time...

      Delete
  26. Take the title of a classic song that became the signature song of the artist who performed it. Add one letter to the very end of the title. The result sounds like something that is true about the royalties generated by the classic song in this week's NPR puzzle.

    LegoWhoObservesThatBondCooks!

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  27. The timing of this puzzle was a little off.

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  28. There are plenty of songs by this artist that I like, and even used to play on a particular instrument. But this one absolutely makes my skin crawl. What's worse, there always seems to be at least one jamoke at the bar who is more than happy than to waste a couple of quarters queueing it up on the jukebox, despite the fact that you can still hear it multiple times a day on the radio anywhere in the country. Fortunately, not unlike the equally execrable "Hotel California," the song lasts almost exactly as long as it takes to step outside and smoke a cigarette (which is definitely better for my emotional well-being, if not for my physical health).

    I will say that the record this artist's concerts in his/her hometown have broken is mightily impressive.

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  29. How about this - change one letter, and it anagrams into two countries which lie on opposite sides of the same body of water.

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    Replies
    1. Then drop a letter and rearrange to get the title of an award-winning movie.

      Delete
    2. ... or drop a different letter and rearrange to get a country a couple thousand miles northwest of the two countries, as the crow flies.

      LegoThinksThat"AsTheFlyFlies"WouldMakeTheDistanceLonger

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    3. hodiau016's riff:
      PIANO MAN - P + R = RIANOMAN = IRAN + OMAN
      Paul's riff:
      RIANO MAN - A = RINOMAN = IRON MAN
      Lego's riff:
      RIANO MAN - N = RIANOMA = ROMANIA

      LegoWhoThankshodiau016ForAFineRiffOffPuzzle

      Delete
  30. I believe someone (perhaps inadvertently) posted the artist’s first name somewhere above on this page.

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  31. Remember back when convoy was not a bad word?

    CW McCall Convoy - YouTube
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j3VN54M1OXA

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  32. Interesting use of the word "feeling".

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  33. Okay, here's a Clue.

    Was Colonel Mustard mustered out of the military after finding himself in a bit of a pickle? And was he the condimental commander of his regiment? Also, was he ever able to ketchup? I really would like to know, and please, don't give me a load of horseradish.

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    Replies
    1. Some days I don't relish your postings.

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    2. Soy you say. Wasabi with that?

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    3. Mayonnaise-ayers learn to accept the truth.

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    4. A tartar should lead the way. Don't Poupon my parade.

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    5. In fact you should go the extra Maille. Sriracha now!

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  34. This is all a tahini bit silly.

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    1. Don't you halva a sense of humor?

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    2. No, but if you hummus a few bars we might join in.

      The Society To Reduce Aggravating Puns is in early formation.

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    3. Oh, for pita's sake, he's bean dippin' again!

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    4. Your humor isn't just partly poor, it's falafel.

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    5. I may have to meat out an appropriate punishment. But that's a boar, so I'll just chuck it.

      Delete
  35. The man is hell on a deux chevaux!

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    1. In 2004 Billy Joel drove his Citroen 2CV into a house when he lost control on a rain slick road.

      https://www.cbsnews.com/news/piano-man-is-smashup-man-again/

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  36. Richard Sanders comes to mind...

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  37. Will Shortz apparently didn't like this puzzle I sent him (how do you know he actually receives them?).

    What is cool and reasonably unique about the made-up phrase:
    "Juliet in ruins"

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    Replies
    1. Jilt us in urine could be a reference to a Trump tryst. But we all know MJ would never stoop to devising an anagram, even with a misuse of the word unique.

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    2. MJ is too sophisticated for a stupid anarghram. But I don't see an answer right away.

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    3. This has nothing to do with a "singer" named Juliet Ruin. I found yesterday that brief exposure to her causes headache, blurred vision and nausea.

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    4. MJ, did I miss the answer to your puzzler? It’s intriguing.

      Delete
    5. Renople:
      Thanks for asking. There were two sort-of tries. Since this thread is pretty much over, I will update it in the new one.

      Delete
  38. Is there any valid reason why Trump can't deliver his State of the Union speech at Mar-a-Lago, or the Kremlin?

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    1. He should give the speech from McDonald's. Invited guests would be Mayor Mike McCheese Pence, Grimace Huckabee Sanders, Stephen Hamberdlar Miller, Officer Big Mac Whitaker, Birdie the Early Bird Conway, and the GOP Fry Kids.

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    2. Or, he could give it in the House Chamber, with no cameras, microphones, Democratic members of Congress, or reporters present.

      Delete
  39. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  40. PIANO MAN >>> PAIN, MOAN

    “In the midst of planning my second spring trip to Bentonville, Arkansas with my mom.” >>> The link is to Crystal Bridges Art Museum in Bentonville, AR. Crystal Bridges points to Christie Brinkley, one of Billy Joel’s three ex-wives.

    {Crystal Bridges is an extraordinary collection of architecture, paintings, sculptures, a geodesic dome, bicycle paths, and nature. It opened 11/11/11 so is just being discovered by much of the world.}

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    1. Funny, I was sure your clue alluded to two of Billy's albums, Glass Houses(1980) and The Bridge(1986), while sdb's Convoy comment did make me think of CB.

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    2. Paul, those allusions work quite well, too.

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  41. Billy Joel, PIANO MANPAIN (feeling) + MOAN (expression of that feeling).

    The 2 foods that can be “eaten” → MANNA + POI.

    Change the P to an R to obtain IRAN + OMAN.
    Now drop the O to yield RAIN MAN, or drop an N to yield ROMANIA.

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  42. PIANO MAN -> PAIN, MOAN

    > The title can also be anagrammed to name two foods.

    MANNA, POI

    > Will's going soft on us.

    In music, PIANO means “soft”. (The instrument was originally called a pianoforte, since it could be played soft or loud, depending on the force with which a key is pressed.)

    > MSG

    Not sure what it means to be a franchise of Madison Square Garden, but Billy Joel is one. Over 100 concerts there, including one tonight.

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    Replies
    1. But doesn't it cause a headache for some people?

      Delete
  43. I wrote, “For an answer, ask Bill, John, Paul, or David.” These are names in the lyrics; I changed “Davy” (who’s still in the Navy) to “David” to preclude searches. The other names with “Davy” did produce a hit on the song lyrics.

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  44. Yeah, but you included Bill even though that’s the bartender’s reference to the artist Billy Joel, no?

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  45. Yep. It is a name in the lyric.

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  46. My posts this past week:

    * "Those who have been solving Puzzleria! puzzles in the past month or so may be expriencing a tinge of deja vu as they solve this week's NPR puzzle."...
    I ran this puzzle on January 11 on Puzzleria!:
    Name a very northern U.S. city in 9 letters. If you have the right one, you can rearrange its letters to get a 4-letter word for a kind of pain one may suffer and a 5-letter word beginning with G for how one may respond to the pain. What is this city?
    Answer: Anchorage (Ache Groan)

    * Answers to this week's Puzzleria! puzzles that I posted on Sunday:
    Name a nationally broadcast weekly show, in three words. The first and last names of a person featured on the broadcast begin with the initial letters of the first and third words in the broadcast’s name. The initial letter of the person’s college degree is the same as the initial letter of the broadcast’s second word. What is the name of this broadcast? What is the name of this person?
    Answer: Weekend Edition Sunday; Will (Enigmatology) Shortz
    Name what famished people would do – in a phrase of two 6-letter words beginning with D and H – if they took a certain facetious hyperbolic expression literally. Rearrange these 12 letters to form more suitable consumables for the famished. What consumables are these?
    Answer: Hors d'oeuvres, an anagram of "devour horses" ("I'm so hungry I could eat a horse!")

    * My Sun Jan 20, 07:38:00 PM PST post:
    "Take the title of a classic song that became the signature song of the artist who performed it. Add one letter to the very end of the title. The result sounds like something that is true about the royalties generated by the classic song in this week's NPR puzzle.
    LegoWhoObservesThatBondCooks!"
    "Ode to Billie Joe" was Bobbie Gentry's signature song. Add an L at the end to the end to form "Ode to Billie Joel" which sounds like "owed to Billy Joel," which would be true about the royalties generated by the classic song in this week's NPR puzzle.
    (In my sign-off, "LegoWhoObservesThatBondCooks!"... "BondCooks" is an anagram of "Boondocks," the key word in a signature song sung by Billy Joe Royal!)

    * Tomorrow's Puzzleria! features a "signature" cryptic crossword puzzle created by Patrick J. Berry, screen name "cranberry."

    LegoAddsThatThereAreAlsoAMessOf"Forged"PuzzlesOnTomorrow'sPuzzleria!

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  47. My clues
    - the artist’s offspring would echo that sentiment” was a reference to the Amazon echo and Alexa, who is Billy Joel’s daughter.
    - the Webster dictionary says that moan is a way to express pain or sexual pleasure. (Making it an interesting word with such conflicting definitions!)

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  48. I said "The artist reminds me of an activity often done in late summer/early fall. " "Billy Joel" anagrams to "Boil Jelly", which I did last fall. :) --Margaret G.

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  49. Piano Man —> Pain, Moan

    The first line of Billy Joel’s signature song is, “It’s nine o’clock on a Saturday…” As I live on the East Coast, I can usually find the puzzle posted at about eight o’clock Sunday morning, or hear the broadcast on my local NPR station at about 8:45. Ergo, my comment about the puzzle being, “... a little late.”

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  50. The ultimate concert would feature The Monkees with The Village People.:
    "And he's talkin' with Davy" (Jones, of The Monkees), "who's still in the Navy
    And probably will be for life"

    I'd never seen the official Village People video before this week. It's hard to watch without smiling, especially knowing that the navy let them use their ships and sailors (your tax dollars at work, it's a grind), thinking the song and video might be good for recruiting!!!

    On the Snopes.com message board the captain of the ship (reportedly) said "Men, you may do 'The Hustle,' but there will be no 'Hippy Hippy Shake' aboard a United States Navy warship!"

    Of course those were the happy times before AIDS was widespread.

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    Replies
    1. Of course, there is also Davy Jones Locker, resting place of countless salts who served in the Navy.

      LegoWhoObservesThatAPleaDealer(NoRocker)WhoSaid"UpWeShouldLockHer"ShouldProbablyBeLockedUpForLife

      Delete
  51. PIANO MAN by Billy Joel; MOAN, PAIN
    Though I managed to get away with the "what are you doing here" comment(it's a lyric from the song), my next comment obviously used too many of Billy's other song titles(cleverly, I thought)to be allowed. Oh well. You're only human.

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  52. Can you believe it! Our strongman president CAVED TO A WOMAN! Would a manly man do such a thing? The shame, the shame!

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    1. Caved twice, first on the SOTU, then on the temporary reopening.

      Season 3 of The Appresidentice (credit to Harry Shearer) is off to a rocking good start. Stay tuned for the next episode!

      Delete
    2. This could be the time when he is most dangerous, when he's desperate!
      The Bill Maher Show, tonight, might be a good one, Ann Coulter, aka First Lady, is a guest.

      Delete
    3. 68C, you disappeared for a while? I agree, he has been emasculated, what does he do?

      If I were Secret Service I'd put an extra detail on Melania, who's probably hiding under a bed, or maybe safe in Florida.

      Bigger worry is he tries to do a stupid Wag the Dog maneuver in Venezuela....

      Delete
    4. Eco - Good to be back!
      Yes, regarding Venezuela, that's the kind of thing I am worried about, or something like it. Fortunately we have a temporary reprieve but I just see him calling a national emergency in 2-3 weeks and we'll have more gridlock again.

      Delete
    5. I wanted to watch it on my computer if possible, but I still need to cook dinner and just finished writing and posting the following on our neighborhood blog:


      Just home after leaving the Friday evening wine tasting at the Holman Road QFC. As I turned from Aurora onto N. 107th I parked beside the empty, former glass shop so I could walk down to the pawn shop and see if the guy I saw at 4pm with the probably stolen TV had pawned it there. I stopped about 15 feet inside the entrance to see a TV that looked like what I would upgrade to, although I would not deal with a pawn shop. It did not have the name, but the remote was there, upside down. I picked it up and saw it is a Visio.

      This is when it gets interesting.

      At that moment a twenty something black guy in a mask and hoodie came running in directly to the counter directly East in a direct line from the front door and past where I was standing. Their cash register is also there and two employees were standing there and this black guy had an automatic black pistol out and stuck it right over the counter in their faces all the while yelling, "Give me the money! Give me the money!" over and over.

      I was unarmed and knew that if he shot them, which it looked like might happen, he would kill me on the way out, so I turned and quietly walked back and out the door and tried calling 911 on my phone. I had trouble with the phone and it took at least three minutes to get to them. It is all on store video and the cops have already seen it. The guy had entered the store right behind me, coming from the South and I had not noticed, but it is clearly on the videos.

      It was all great fun as I love excitement, but it is now time for dinner.

      Delete
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    7. Wow, that is scary!! Glad you made it out O.K., were shots ever fired?

      Delete
    8. Thanks, but for me it wasn't. I enjoyed it. I know that sounds crazy, but it is true. Here is what I wrote on our two neighborhood blogs in response to one of the guys who runs one of them:

      Nathan,

      Thanks, but it wasn't scary for me at all. You never know for sure how you will react in a situation. I was surprised as I was walking out of the joint that my heart rate was seeming to be normal and I wondered why I was not scared that he might shoot me in the back. I was also thinking he was too involved, and if I got out right away I might be okay. Then I had some distance to walk back to my car, but at the same time trying to get my crappy cell phone to dial 911, all the while realizing I really should get back to the car around the corner because if he came out and saw me with the phone I might get shot. I have learned how to control my fear when I am in a dangerous situation, but this time I did not feel fear. I am very familiar with the fear feeling, but I have learned it does not always appear when most expected. Sometimes it does though. This was not one of those times where I was scared and controlled my fear, at least I don't think it was. I have had lots of those experiences. I just was not scared.

      Many years ago I was in a tavern on business on Beacon Hill at about ten am, when a guy came in with a Ruger Blackhawk .44 magnum he pointed at me and the owner as we stood just inside the front door. I felt more concern on that occasion, but not strong fear, and I took the weapon away from the guy. I have had a lifelong fascination with fear and my relationship with it. I hate feeling it, but I also love it in some strange way.

      One other thing I have learned is that thinking about a potential experience can produce a lot of fear although we are safe at the time of these thoughts, then should it actually happen it may not produce those feelings at all.

      Confront you fears and you may find they are your friends.

      Thanks for the concern,

      Delete
    9. So, SDB, the question we all want to know: Did you buy the TV?

      The problem with a pawn shop is you always get rooked.

      Delete
    10. No, I saw it En passant.

      It is a Visio without a tuner. I had seen them in the stores before and they seem to be good and also expensive. This was marked at only $125. I would need to purchase a separate tuner. Anyway I only saw it at knight.

      Delete
    11. Just as-king.

      When a relationship gets old do you have a stale mate?

      Delete
    12. I'm not sure. I'll check mate.

      Delete
    13. SDB: I am shocked to read about your close call. You were very lucky to have gotten out of there. I hope they put that guy away. Take care and stop going to pawn shops!!

      Delete
    14. Thanks Natasha. However I don't go to pawn shops. It was a quirk that I was there. I don't think the guy was caught. As I have posted before, I do not believe in luck.

      Delete
    15. Sdb: Do you consider carrying a gun now? It was a close call. Why can't they catch him if have video. Did he not see you leaving. Did you have your back to him or did you back out?

      Delete
    16. Natasha:
      I have had a CWP since I was 21, but I rarely carry. Had I been carrying at that time it would most likely have been my .25 cal. and it would have been unrealistic to try and use it against him except as a last resort. Had I been wearing my S&W .38 cal. revolver with hollow points I would have shot him in the back of the head. I don't like having to go around with a weapon all the time and only do so when it seems like there might be a more likely need, such as when I recently purchased a used car with cash.

      I have make a MS-WORD document with over 36 of my extremely close calls with imminent death. This will not make that list.

      I turned quietly to my left and walked out normally, but as quietly as I could. I wanted to look normal if he happened to turn around and see me.

      He was wearing a hoodie and a lower face mask, so will be hard to identify, although he was caught, as I was, on several of their cameras. I stopped in yesterday to see if they would let me look at the videos.

      Delete
  53. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  54. Isn’t this when, in British dramas, the butler leaves a Webley revolver, one round, and a snifter with two fingers of brandy, on the, “lords,” desk, before locking the door to the study.

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    1. Back in the '60's I owned a used .45 cal. Webley revolver. I thought it was as lethal as an Ann COuLTer on steroids. I sold it.

      Delete
    2. SDB,
      Thought she was already on meth. Certainly has the physique of a meth-head. She radiates that lovely anorexic pallor, and of course her incessant nattering does mimic the typical speed freak on a run.

      Delete
    3. I don't know much about illicit drugs, but I agree about her being really skinny. That was the first thing I noticed when she walked out. So that and the drugs might help explain how she can be so unbelievably stupid.

      Delete
  55. This week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from listener Joe Krozel of Creve Coeur, Mo. Name a vehicle in two words, each with the same number of letters. Subtract a letter from each word, and the remaining letters in order will spell the first and last names of a famous writer. Who is it?

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    Replies
    1. (I keep getting distracted by names that should be on the Car Talk Staff Credits page.)

      Delete