Sunday, June 02, 2019

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jun 2, 2019): Know Your Vehicles

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jun 2, 2019): Know Your Vehicles:
Q: Think of a verb in its present and past tense forms. Drop the first letter of each word. The result will name two vehicles. What are they?
I really wanted MOPED to work somehow, but I had to get rid of that idea. Back to the drawing board.

I was hinting at "strike" both in getting rid of an idea and in carrying sign "boards" while picketing.
A: STRIKE & STRUCK --> TRIKE & TRUCK

134 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. Unfortunately, my joke answer is a little too close to the real answer.

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    1. Here's a picture of someone riding on a TUCK.
      TICKs, notorious hitchhikers themselves, also serve as vehicles for various microbes.
      Maybe it's hitchhikers all the way around.

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    2. Interesting. I wonder if Dr. Seuss was a fan of Turtles All the Way Down.

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  3. As easy as a peak in a poke or a pin in a pun...

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    1. No, a "poke" is a sack that can be used for transport.

      poke 3 (pōk)
      n. Chiefly Southern US
      A sack; a bag.
      [Middle English, probably from Old North French; see pocket.]
      Word History: A pig in a poke is a colorful vernacular expression used to describe something offered in a manner that conceals its true nature or value. Naturally, a buyer cannot inspect the pig if it is covered by a poke—that is, a bag or sack. The word poke meaning "bag" is not confined to just the American South—in many parts of Scotland, poke bag is still used of a little paper bag for carrying purchases like candy. Poke first appears in English in the 1200s and probably comes from Old North French, the northern dialect of Old French. The Old North French word in turn is probably of Germanic origin and is related to words like Icelandic poki, "bag." Poke has several relatives within English. The word pocket comes from Middle English poket, meaning "pouch, small bag," which in turn comes from Anglo-Norman pokete, a diminutive of Old North French poke. Pouche, a variant form of Old North French poke, is the source of the English word pouch.

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  4. For the vehicles, a possible ratio: One to Six.

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  5. Is this Eco’s puzzle? Pretty good one.

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  6. The first verb can also be a noun....something our government was (sort of) familiar with.

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  7. One vehicle is an abbreviation. The other one doesn't trouble me.

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    1. I think that clue is a bit misleading. When you say that one vehicle is an abbreviation, most people think of an acrostic. That one vehicle IS NOT an acrostic.

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    2. As the author of the puzzle I initially had some concerns over one of the vehicle words. I can assure all that I did extensive research, involving looking at a minimum of the first 3 results from a Google search.

      I ultimately decided there was a parallel in common parlance that is widely accepted, and that was good enough for me.

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    3. I considered trike as shorthand for tricycle to be equivalent to bike as shorthand for bicycle.

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  8. Please add my congratulations to ecoarchitect (also known as Greg VanMechelen of Berkeley, California) who created this week's wonderful NPR puzzle. eco is a talented and true puzzle-maker who has challenged and entertained us with myriads of his Bonus Puzzles posted here on Blaine's blog.
    Great job, oh architect of dwellings and puzzles!
    (no intentional hints in this post)

    LegoNotesThatManyOthersWhoContributeToBlaine'sBlogAreAlsoDeservingOfHavingTheirPuzzlesChosenAsNPRSundayPuzzles

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    1. Thanks Lego, et al. I have a long way to match your prowess in the vaunted Pantheon of Puzzle Providers. As well as Cranberry and SDB - who else?

      Does one get a lapel pin?

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    2. "No lapel pin for you!," eco.
      In order to be awarded the "coveted" NPR lapel pin one must be chosen to go on the air and humiliate oneself while playing the on-air challenge.
      I am not aware of all Blainesvillians who have been sufficiently fortunate (the correct word) to have their puzzles chosen by Will. cranberry, multiple times; Mathew Huffman, at least once.
      There are others of whom I am aware who have composed puzzles that I believe to be NPR-worthy.

      LegoBelivesThatThoseWhoAreDeemedDeservingOfBeingChosenToReceiveSoupAlsoAreAwardedTheCoveted"LadlePin"

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    3. Congrats, eco. Since you asked, Will has used four of my puzzles on air. Did you get your degree in Architecture from Cal?

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    4. Congratulations, eco. I didn't know that was your real name. Welcome to the club. Now you know they don't rig the selection process.

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    5. Too bad about the lapel pin, I've heard there was a market for them in Seattle.

      Very impressive Dave, I've a long way to go.

      And Cran, I never suspected rigging, I just never thought my grubby little offering would have much allure.

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    6. lego: Great site re Seinfield! Thanks!

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    7. Yo this puzzle is dope- Eco. Thanks.

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  9. As this puzzle was created by a long-time Blainer, it is sure to be a hit. Congrats to Eco.

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  10. My wheels were spinning for a bit, and then it hit me.

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  11. Congratulations Eco. Nice to have a neighbor win puzzle submission.

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  12. Replies
    1. Do you avoid Novocaine to transcend dental medication?

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    2. My mom never has Novocaine, even for deep drilling at the dentist's office. . .

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    3. I find that interesting because Novocaine never worked on me and I haven't used it, or anything else, at the dentist since. Not using it makes it so much easier. Also I am a TM teacher.

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    4. I meant since my mid-teen years.

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    5. Have you TMed your TM teacher training, skydiveboy?

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    6. I think the Maharishi™ beat him to it.

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    7. Indeed, sdb, I was being all smart alecky.

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  13. Having operated both of these vehicles, one within the last week, this puzzle didn’t take too long.

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  14. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  15. has actually been through Blainesville (in Belmont County, OH). But not on either of these vehicles. Blainesville looks more like stereotypical Appalachia than like the stereotypical image of Ohio.

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  16. eco: I am guessing you have sent Wee Willy a bunch of puzzles you thought were better.

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    1. I've only sent in 5 or 6. Having only received the NPR auto-response I was thinking of unleashing them on this blog; though I had completely forgotten this one until I got an email on Friday.

      Better puzzles? There are definitely some I like more, but there's a certain element of luck in matching WS's preferences.

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  17. Is a Zamboni a rink vehicle? And a stretch limo a rank vehicle? I'll drink to that!

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  18. If anything, this puzzle seems easier than last weeks.

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  19. Congrats, Eco! Nice puzzle. And I'll up Skydiveboy's 100 to 300! --Margaret G.

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    1. Margaret G.:
      That was not an offer. It was how much I sold my NPR pin for.

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    2. Eco, I would ask them when you can expect your lapel pin.See what they say. You earned one!

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  20. Eco: Do you know a plumber in Berkeley? Dripping kitchen faucet.

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    1. Natasha, you don't need a plumber to fix a faucet leak. If you don't have the common, everyday tools and/or the knowledge to do it yourself, I am sure you have friends who do, and will be happy to help. A plumber will cost you big bucks for a job anyone can do. If you are renting, then it is not your responsibility; get the landlord to fix it.

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    2. Natasha: Albert Nahman is one of the better plumbers; he and I also serve on the same non-profit board, so I may be biased.

      A simple drip isn't that hard to fix:
      1) there should be a shut-off valve under the sink
      2) after turning that off (it's very important) the sink handle(s) should be easy to remove. Since there are hundreds of types it's hard to be specific. Old ones have a simple screw on the top, new ones sometimes have a subtle Allen screw, or they are covered with some kind of escutcheon plate.
      3) the actual valve is inside that, should be a brass contraption, but again there are lots of types. Usually those are screwed in, but twist gently, use a monkey wrench or pliers if you must, but better if you can protect the valve with rubber in between.
      4) the likely culprit is a worn out rubber gasket or washer. They are easily removed.
      5) take them with you to any plumbing or hardware store. Ashby, Truitt & White, Ace, (or if you must Home Despots) will have the right-sized replacement. Staff will help if you are unsure.
      6) reverse 4,3, 2, and 1 and you're done.

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    3. Eco, I thank you so much. It is not a bad drip. I just do not wsnt to tske apart by myself. Roto rooter charges 200 dollars an hour. I will see if albert can help. Can i give your nsme as reference? Hsve to give nursing school entrance tests mon. And tues. At college. Has to drip til wed. I can turn off water.so grateful.

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    4. Ask a neighbor to help. It's what God put them there for.

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    5. Natasha, of course you can use my name, though Albert has a large crew, and does not answer the phone himself and is very unlikely to do the work. I know a few of the staff, but not that well.

      I also know they are very popular (and busy) so calling in advance to make an appointment is worthwhile. A few months ago we had an issue at my office (backed up toilet, I know how to fix those too but if the landlord pays....), the regular plumber was on vacation, and Nahman's office said they were booked for a couple of days.

      I don't know their hourly rates, but SDB is correct that lots of people can do this. If you don't have friends you might consider posting to NextDoor.

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    6. Eco and SDB: Thanks for all the help. My neighbor has lots of people he uses for construction, I will ask him. He has helped me a lot in the past. His wife is ill so did not want to bother him. You probably know her, Eco. Is political. I just want professional who is covered by a license. Anything can and usually does go wrong with my house repairs.

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    7. My next-door neighbor actually IS a plumber, but I haven't had the nerve to ask him to fix anything (yet) for free!

      I am going to copy and save the instructions above for leaky faucets. Knowing my luck, though, I'd get stuck at trying to get the screws out of the all in one piece 180 degree bend/high faucet [there must be a name for those, but I simply can't think of it.]

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    8. I'm sure there are many YouTube videos you can watch for free and learn how to do simple tasks like this.

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    9. Or one might ask some Farrah Faucet Majors from the local college.

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  21. I won't give any clues or bonus puzzles this week, but I can offer some (entertainment if not entertaining) Swifties, some obviously dated:

    “I’m too tired to make a roster,” the coach yawned listlessly.
    “I ain’t taking my car off the cinder blocks,” Zeke asserted tirelessly.

    “What a funny cartoon,” Mr. Jones chuckled.
    “I miss my co-star!” Jackie Gleason cried artlessly.
    "Some movies are too grand," David said leanly.
    "Cooking should be fun!" Julia quipped in a childlike fashion.
    “It’s a beautiful morning,” Doris chimed daily.
    “I’m looking forward to a funny routine,” Bob hoped.
    “I like sports casting,” Mr. Gowdy said curtly.
    "I've got stage-fright," Noel claimed cowardly.
    “I like dropping bombs,” Enola said gaily.

    “I want to have a child,” Chelsea Manning said transparently.
    "2018 has to be better than 2017," Charlie predicted rosily.
    "At first I supported him, then I didn't, then I did," Jeff whined flakily.
    “I don’t like his treatment of the LGBQT community,” Taylor stated swiftly.
    "Trump should tell the truth," Howard said sternly.
    “My teenage daughter was totally hot,” Donald trumpeted.

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    1. "Indeed it was a challenging climb," Alex Honnold explained while holding his audience's attention.

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    2. “John Nance Garner was right,” said Mike, pensively.

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    3. "I needed no help to climb Everest," claimed Sir Edmund hilariously.

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    4. Which didn't upset Tenzing, nor gay onlookers.

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    5. "Not sure I can finish your tabletop," said Tom ... counterproductively.

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  22. What Maggie Thatcher might have said to a preschooler.

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  23. I think getting out of the country and going to England for a few days, might do Trump some good.

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    Replies
    1. Any time he is out of the country does the rest of us good.

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  24. Replies
    1. Strike/ trike.
      Richard Gere starred in the classic action film Strike Force in 75" . Awesome movie.

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  25. Jeopardy fans are in for a surprise tonight.

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    1. ... unless they read the spoiler online, at nytimes.com, e.g.

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    2. This site updates J! results fairly early every weekday:

      https://thejeopardyfan.com/2019/06/final-jeopardy-6-3-2019.html

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    3. The great anticipation and the "spoiler" hype is about an event that took place over two and a half months ago.
      I have been fan of Jeopardy for years, but I can't help the "game show" vibes I have.

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    4. I meant to say "quiz show" above, referring to the scandals of the 1950's.
      Watching the show last night did nothing to dispel that feeling. May not be scandalous, but fishy fits.

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    5. I was curious how his reign might end, kinda hoped he would break the record, too.
      If he was going to lose I thought maybe the deciding question might be related to the "study of Hieroglyphics".

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  26. Gee, thanks Jan. i used up my last NYT freebie on the 3rd. May have been my first one, at that. Screw them.

    Looking forward to watching an interesting episode.

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    Replies
    1. Washington Post has it, too.

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    2. It's basically everywhere. We're spoiled by internet news.

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    3. I had no idea the conversation was going to get so serious this early.

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  27. The puzzle seems a bit childish this week

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  28. One theory of what happened to bring the Jeopardy roll to a halt is that Ken Jennings called The James and said: "Now look here. Do you want to be on my new trivia show or not?"

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    1. I ken get on board that idea.

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    2. I find it interesting that both Ken and James were beaten by women.

      Is it politically incorrect to comment that Emma Boettcher looks like central casting's idea of a librarian?

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    3. No, but it might be if I were to point out that she is not wearing a rainbow flag pin.

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    4. Alex trying to encourage her to say she knew about James's run ahead of time is so awkward. 

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    5. The James phenomenon and Alex's illness have opened some windows on the inner workings of Jeopardy that the management would have rather left dark.
      Emma looked thoroughly peeved.
      Basketball prevailed here again last night.

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  29. In this photo does it look like our feckless leader's head was photoshopped to look too small?

    He looks singularly unhappy, so a Mini Bonus Contest: Provide a creative caption or Dinky Toadstool thought bubble to go with this photo. Or you can provide thought bubbles for the Queen or for Elizabeth, just be clear about who. For example:
    DT: "I thought these monkey suits were just for Obama!"
    DT: "There better not lose my two scoops of ice cream while standing here posing!"
    MT: "Ha-ha, at least I get better pre-nup than Marla."
    QE: "Thank goodness I'm so bony I don't have to worry about what I'd taste like with ketchup!"

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    1. It does not look odd to me, but who could blame a guy for getting a little head while in London?

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    2. "If this son of a bitch snuffles one more time I swear I will abdicate on the spot and upstage him and then Charles can deal with the bastard."

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    3. "I wonder if anyone will notice that his hands are the same size as mine?" QE2

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    4. QE: "To think that I could be listening to Pink Floyd's 'The "Wall', right now", oh well...

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    5. DT: "To think that I could be playing 'Tic-Tac-Toe' , right now", oh well...

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    6. Seriously:
      What stands out to me is how ill fitting he is attired. His jacket looks as if he borrowed it from is older brother. The sleeves are way, way too long and there is no cuff showing. The shirt collar points should be over, not under, his tie, but hardly anyone seems to know this these days.

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    7. He just doesn't look good at all in that tux, his weight problem makes it even worse!

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    8. I thought maybe I was alone in noticing Trump's badly fitting attire, but Google has corrected that and gone even further, and correctly so too, in pointing out his faux pas. They become clearer when I look at the photo showing their full body. His trousers look like he got them from a tent maker. They should be slim fitting, but not tight. His are balloons. His vest is probably large enough to function as a pup tent should the queen toss his ass out on the street after their port. Hard to believe no one even figured out he should be sporting a pocket square. At least he is not wearing a clip on red bow tie. If you think the Royals did not notice, you are very much mistaken.

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    9. Photographer: "I haven't seen a crowd like this since that diaper rash photo shoot."

      Vest Buttons: "HEEEELLLLLLLPPP!"

      QE: "I lived to 93 for this?"

      Melania: "I can't wait until In Depends® ence Day."

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    10. There is nothing wrong with vest buttons. Sometimes they are covered, and sometimes not.

      I found this link that actually shows the proper way to wear a bow tie with wing collar over the top.

      Black Full Dress Tail Tux by Joseph & Feiss | Tuxedo Rental | Men's ...
      https://tuxedo.menswearhouse.com/black-full-dress-tail-tuxedo-joseph-feiss-id-5235

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    11. I think it should also be pointed out here that a tuxedo, or tux, is black tie and the Walther PPK is optional. Tails is the true and original formal wear, and white tie, and it is not a tuxedo.

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    12. Melania: Hmmm, Donny's birthday is coming up, maybe for a cheap present, I can get him lickety-split over to a different used clothing store??

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    13. There is a hideous photo of Johnny Depp wearing white tie, cane and white gloves included, with white spats as well. You will have to look for it online, but it is not hard to find. Awful as it is, it is nowhere near as disgusting as Trump in his debacle outfit.

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    14. SDB: my comment about the vest buttons was that they are screaming for help. The only thing that would cover them is his oversized gut.

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    15. Oh, well played, and I completely missed it. I imagine Buckingham Palace will have enough snarky humour for at least six months now.

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    16. "Why didn't I listen to my advisors?" QE2

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    17. "Even Herr Hitler didn't bomb that badly when he attacked London." QE2

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    18. I just now took a closer look at his tie, and it appears to be a clip on. Everything is fake with this asshole.

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    19. Hard to tell on the tie, but it's easy to see the queen and her guest look happier in this photo.

      I suppose we were all smiling a bit more back then.

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    20. It is easy to tell if a bow tie is fake if you can see it up close. If it is perfectly aligned it is fake. You cannot tie a bow tie perfectly. I have been asked occasionally if my bow tie is real, and that tells me I tied it well, but the person asking doesn't know what to look for. It is not expected that your bow tie look perfect either.

      I suspect most bow ties in movies are clip on, and, as in the case of James Bond untying his at the end of an evening, I am sure they switched to a real one. You almost know for sure if when untied both ends hang down the same length, because you do not tie a bow tie with both ends even at the start. I see this faux pas sometimes in films.

      It is a bit more difficult to tell for certain, but my impression is that Trump is not wearing a proper formal shirt either, but one of the cheap knock offs you see nowadays where there are no true collar points, but fake sew on tabs, and no real french cuffs either.

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  30. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    1. TRIKE, TRUCK from STRIKE, STRUCK

      "Transcendental Meditation" = TM = TRIKE Motorcycle, a three-wheeled type of motorcycle.

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  31. It would be a disaster if one of the vehicles crashed into the other.

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  32. STRIKE → STRUCK

    TRIKETRUCK

    My clue: easy as “a peak in a poke” and “a pin in a pun” suggest that the dropped letter is an S (speak/spoke, spin/spun).

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  33. STRIKE, STRUCK -> TRIKE, TRUCK

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  34. I wrote, “For the vehicles, a possible ratio: One to Six.” This referred to three-wheelers and eighteen-wheelers.

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  35. Strike, Struck → Trike, Truck

    Probably was inappropriate for me to offer clues, but:

    I have a long way to match your prowess as in strike a match

    I've heard there was a market for them in Seattle. February marked the 100th anniversary of the Seattle General Strike.

    Very impressive Dave, I've a long way to go. I almost wrote I'm in awe (struck), but feared the BA. So instead I decided to strike camp with a long way to go.

    And Cran, I never suspected rigging, I just never thought my grubby little offering would have much allure. Fishing for a response.

    Better puzzles? There are definitely some I like more, but there's a certain element of luck in matching WS's preferences. Change the "l" in the two highlighted words.

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  36. I didn't have much time to spend on this weeks puzzle. I kept trying to make Tricycle work as I was not sure that "trike" was a full word in and of itself. Oh well

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  37. STRIKE/STRUCK.....TRIKE/TRUCK.
    As the rider of a three-wheel motorcycle (2014 CanAm RT Limited) I didn’t have to go any further than my garage to see the answer to this puzzle.

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  38. STRIKE, STRUCK; TRIKE, TRUCK
    I used the word "rig" in my comment. Rig is another word for truck.

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  39. This past weekend was kind of fun for me. At the local "small" airport near me, a WW2 era B-17 flew in from Houston, TX for the weekend, giving tours and flights (for a cost)!
    The B-17 was called "The Texas Raiders", and it was pretty cool. I made sure to be around early on Sunday to see it fire up and take off. While we were waiting for startup, I noticed one of the grounds crew "walking" one of the propellers by himself. I asked him if he wanted any help and he wasn't about to say no! We walked #3 &#4 engines while others helped on #1 & #2.
    Anyway, it was exciting to see the plane start up and finally take off. As it did a fly-by, I couldn't help but think what a sight it would have been to see 500, or more, of these flying in formation during the war (so long as I wasn't on the receiving end of the attack)!

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    1. I found this article interesting. I often drive past the airport where the picture of the plane was taken a few weeks ago, before its trans-Atlantic flight to participate in D-Day anniversary activities this week.

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    2. jan:
      Those a great fun to jump out of. Not on D-Day maybe, but most other days.

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    3. Jan - That is an interesting article, thanks for sharing! What a piece of flying history that plane is. You don't hear much about Operations Market Garden or Varsity much, these days.
      C-47's & DC-3's are always neat to see in old newsreels and especially in person. There's one, based in Topeka, that was converted to am AC-47 gunship during the Vietnam war that occasionally drops in at the local air shows. It always makes a good appearance, too!
      During the flybys over Normandy the other day, the announcers kept talking about other things and very little was said about what was flying overhead. Kind of disappointing...

      SDB - I bet those are fun to jump out of!!!

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    4. Last night on HBO, they had an interesting documentary called "The Cold Blue".
      It was made using mostly unused, left over footage from the William Wyler documentary "Memphis Belle". The footage has been remastered and tells more about the servicemen involved in the air war. It was well done and will be replayed a few more times, this week. It's worth the watch.

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    5. Later there was a movie titled, Memphis Belle. I do NOT recommend it.

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    6. I've been told that the B-17 could be backed up (driven in reverse) on the ground, even though the prop pitch couldn't be reversed: You lock the brake on the left main gear, feather the props on all but the left outboard engine, which you rev, causing the plane to pivot clockwise around the left main gear. Then you lock the right main gear brake, feather all but the right outboard prop, rev the right outboard engine, and the plane pivots counterclockwise around the right main gear. Repeat until you've crab-walked the plane backwards into its parking spot.

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    7. jan, Did you really think us Blaine's folk would not already know that?

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  40. This week's challenge: This challenge comes from listener Judy Grant of Chapel Hill, N.C. Think of a famous actor, first and last names, that together contain each of the five vowels (A, E, I, O, and U) exactly once. Add an M and rearrange the result to get a famous writer, also first and last names. Who are these famous people?

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    1. Over 1300 responses last week.

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    2. If I have the intended answer, interestingly, neither of these two people were born with their famous names. --Margaret G.

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    3. and born in the same country. :)

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    4. Hmm,... The first writers I've found alphabetically to have the vowels (A, E, I, O, & U) once each in their first and last names:

      Charles Bukowski (1920–1994)

      and

      Sheila Burnford (1918–1984)

      Darn it! Neither of them has an M!

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    5. Hmm,... The first writers I've found alphabetically to have the vowels (A, E, I, O, & U) once each in their first and last names:

      Charles Bukowski (1920–1994)

      and

      Sheila Burnford (1918–1984)

      Darn it! Neither of them has an M!

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