Sunday, September 22, 2019

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Sep 22, 2019): No Letters in Common

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Sep 22, 2019): No Letters in Common:
Q: Think of an adjective in five letters in two syllables. The first syllable phonetically sounds like a synonym of the full, five-letter word. And strangely these two words have no letters in common. What words are these?
I was so focused on homophones like "ewe" and "you" and "aye/eye" and "I" that I couldn't see the forest for the trees.

Edit: My hints were FOcused, homoPHONEs and FOrest
A: PHONY --> FAUX

146 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Blaine, you mean I = eye as in "iris" ? (oops, only four letters.)

      Delete
    2. Isn't a "homephone" something ET wanted?

      Delete
  2. What you would have after a certain surgical procedure.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I thought it described evidence of sloppy eating, though I suppose I am mispronouncing something in a comical way.

      Delete
    2. How did watching the hawks go? Not a good score today, the fog made bad conditions. But yesterday they reported:
      Total Sightings: 493
      Hours Counted: 5.92
      HPH: 83.28
      Total Species: 10

      Species Counts:
      Turkey Vulture: 109
      Osprey: 2
      Northern Harrier: 5
      Sharp-shinned Hawk: 74
      Cooper's Hawk: 114
      Red-shouldered Hawk: 2
      Red-tailed Hawk: 157
      American Kestrel: 8
      Merlin: 3
      Peregrine Falcon: 4

      Unidentified...
      Accipiter: 12
      Buteo: 1
      Raptor: 2
      Total unidentified: 15

      Where's WW, our local naturalist?

      Delete
    3. Not to be confused with a baguette.

      Delete
    4. LOL. I think that is the French term for this procedure.

      Delete
    5. Yes, and they are proud of their buns too.

      Delete
    6. Thanks for wondering, eco.

      Al is all that separates a naturalist and a naturist.

      And, speaking of wild bird counts, I started a new endeavor today so things are a bit wild here.

      Delete
    7. If it's birds that you're into, might I suggest Duluth and a place called Hawk Ridge. This time of year is wonderful for doing a little bird watching.

      Delete
    8. Any of you bird fans know where the ducks are going these days?

      Delete
    9. Ask Donald and see if you get a Goofy answer.

      Delete
    10. Thanks Jan, I couldn’t resist a setup like that one!

      Delete
  3. Both words describe Trump perfectly!

    ReplyDelete
  4. But must that adjective be in five letters? When I look up the word in my dictionary, I see this puzzle's expected five letter spelling, but then I see the word "or", and then I see a six letter spelling. (Don't worry, the extra letter is still not in the synonym.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The six letter spelling may be an accepted one; however, I am much more familiar with the five letter spelling and don't think I've ever seen it used with six.

      Delete
    2. I savor the thought of the multiple spellings of the 1 syllable word.

      Delete
  5. It's almost unethical to give a clue.

    ReplyDelete
  6. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  7. WS didn't really think this was challenging, did he?

    ReplyDelete
  8. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Using phonetics and reading both answer words backwards also gets you two words that describe views of Trump.

    ReplyDelete
  10. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  11. This one really sounds like fanatic pronunciation to me.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Wow, two Blainesvillagers in the soup with the blog administrator already!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What can I say? Only that as Blaine deletes me enough times, I'll learn what a clue really is.

      Delete
  13. Replies
    1. Start with MEN and move the N around to the beginning to get NME. Read it out loud, letter by letter, and it sounds like "enemy", which is a synonym of "foe", which sounds like FAUX, which is French for PHONY.

      Delete
  14. Im still having trouble with this one.

    ReplyDelete
  15. What capital city is the only ghost town in the world that serves as the de jure capital of a political entity? Click HERE for the answer.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Replies
    1. I call people with a phone call, which is like phony.

      Delete
  17. If you take the graphic Blaine provided and connect, in order, the 5 letters of the 2-syllable word, you will form a facsimile of an initial letter that appears five times in the text of the puzzle, and that also appears five times as an ending letter in the meandering sentence you are now reading.

    LegoWhoEnjoysConnecting(AndEating)TheDots

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lego, I think you win the prize for the most dotty clue I've ever seen. And I think you meant this link.

      Delete
    2. Yes, eco that was the Dots commercial I was trying to link to. Thank you.
      The little boy in the commercial looks to me to be Jason Lively, who portrayed Rusty Griswald in "European Vacation."

      Lego...............................................

      Delete
    3. And the narrator sounds like William Schallert, who played Patty Duke's father, or uncle, or both, or something.

      Delete
    4. Thanks, Paul.
      The Dots hawker/talker does indeed sound like Patty/Cathy Lane's "Poppo" Martin.
      William Schallert died on May 8, 2016, at his home in Pacific Palisades at the age of 93, six weeks after the death of his on-screen daughter Patty Duke on March 29.
      Great slice of the 1960s.
      Oh, and I think the guy who "saves the yellow" Dots for his movie date, Mildred, in the commercial is probably Bruno Kirby.

      LegoWhoWondersIf"IdenticalCousins"IsActually"AThing"

      Delete
    5. The internet is good for something: if you check the comments to the YouTube version of the ad a commenter identifies the kid as Moosie Drier. He's acted, directed, and done voice overs and is still working today.

      As for Bruno Kirby (nee Bruno Giovanni Quidaciolu) -- maybe.

      Delete
    6. Lego, that’s quite a funky hint! Though if I’ve got this right, I think you undercounted the instances of that ending letter by one ;)

      Delete
  18. I have what appears to be a legitimate, alternate answer, it works with the given clues but doesn't seem to agree with everyone's hints.
    I am not impressed with the wording of this puzzle.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Sure sounds like Mason Adams, who specialized in warm, conversational voice overs for products such as Smucker's. He had a long career in radio before then, playing (among other roles) the villainous Atom Man, enemy of Superman. A genuinely nice guy too, according to reports.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Musical Clue: Milli Vanilli

    ReplyDelete
  21. I am reminded of a popular type of restaurant.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I lucked out finding one in Portland last week.

      Delete
    2. In Portland, Oregon I presume? That shouldn't have been too difficult. Did you get up my way too?

      Delete
    3. I have a funny story about that place. I will tell you later.

      Delete
    4. Yes, we were in Seattle for a couple of days, too. Amazingly great library. Appalling homeless problem.

      Delete
    5. Yes the main library is wonderful—a Dutch treat.

      Seattle is #19 population wise, but #3 homeless wise, or poor, I should say. Trump will fix it for us any day now.

      I hope the weather cooperated while you visited. It has been a lousy summer here this year. Did you visit the Government Locks?

      Delete
    6. Weather was OK in Seattle and Portland, but rainy in Olympic National Park and rainier at Mt. Rainier. Got some good hiking in there and at Multnomah Falls, though. Didn't see Government Locks; thought that referred to Trump's combover.

      Delete
    7. And where does Jan hail from? I am sure SDB knows the place I am talking about. Restaurant of renown in Seattle.

      Delete
    8. Madison, NJ, until a couple of months ago. Now, Cambridge (our fair city), MA.

      Delete
    9. jan,
      I referred to The Hiram M. Chittenden Locks as the Gov't Locks as some do because I figured you would not remember the actual name. Most here call them the Ballard Locks. They are one of the 3 most visited places tourists see in Seattle, and well worth the trip. I have no idea what Plantsmith is referring to in connection to you, but he may be thinking of Canlis, which is the first restaurant that came to my mind. I hope he does not mean The Wheel Of Misfortune. Maybe the long gone Doghouse. Or he may be thinking about a place downtown I don't want to say the name of, but the initials are W.G.

      Delete
    10. I lived within walking distance of the locks when I was in grad school. A nice place.

      Delete
    11. Most Seattle native residents have no idea how the locks changed the city in ways they never imagined. The locks are understood by most as being nothing more than a waterway. Free guided tours are offered daily that most don't even know about, but are well worth attending. Some of the guides are more informative than others and provide an amazing experience. Were it not for the locks Seattle would unrecognizable to what it is today.

      Delete
    12. Yea the Locks are awesome. Used to go their quite a bit and have taken visitors out there. My MIL loved the Doghouse. W.G. initials I don't recognize. We used to go to 13 coins- the original one. I will give you the name on Thursday as it is kind of a dead giveaway.

      Delete
    13. The 13 Coins was much better in the old days' back when they had Steak Sinatra alla Mia and their abalone was to die for. Ivar had several joints and restaurants. Some went bust and some survived, but the food was not first rate until he died. He was a total mess in his last years and his management team had a hell of a time working around him. He owned it all himself and had total control, but he had to be worked around in order for it to work. I happened to run into him 2 days before he suddenly died and he was making a total fool of himself. El Gaucho is a long lasting success and very good. I bed you never even heard of The Ruins?

      Delete
    14. Yes never heard of the Ruins. My wife grew up on Capitol hill and I came to Seattle in 88" She might know it. Think I have been to El Gaucho once.And W.G. must be wild Ginger. Favorite Italian? We used to like Serafina's on Roosevelt I think. Steeak Sinatra sounds good. And there is an old place in Burien- Angelos.

      Delete
    15. Very few of these restaurants in Atlanta. I found only one good one. It was featured on the Food Channel.

      Delete
    16. The initials for the restaurant in Seattle are WTP. I think there are two now- one in Bellevue and one in Southcenter.

      Delete
  22. My dial-up internet connection just isn't fast enough to search for five-letter adjectives.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah, brings back fond memories of my TI 745. No, kids, those aren't cupholders for your lattes in back. We need mo' dem kind of clues...

      Delete
    2. Only sharp clues will pass the litmus test.

      Delete
  23. Replies
    1. A recent movie is " Can you ever forgive me." in which she played a phony book author.

      Delete
  24. Jan Cambridge. "our fair city." Home of Click and Clack. RIP. Loved that show.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The day I moved from NJ, the city dedicated a plaque to Tommy in Harvard Square, just down the block from a certain law office.

      Delete
    2. I still have not had an opportunity to use the free parking pass they sent me a few years ago.

      Delete
  25. SDB OH. Wheel of misfortune. Duh. Where the Wheedle dines on oysters and fine wine? Never dined there.

    ReplyDelete
  26. But where can you get an authentic Philly Cheese in Seattle?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So Dewey Cheatham and Howe is the real deal? I thought it was part of the act. Thanks

      Delete
    2. No, it is part of the act/

      Delete
    3. I remember seeing the name in a Bugs Bunny cartoon, or something like that, predating Car Talk. I think the 3 Stooges also used it as a gag.

      Doubtless someone will Google it. Or Duckduckgo it.

      Delete
  27. OK...so my best effort has been "awful - offal" Obviously wrong, but at least I tried! I'll will await your correct answers tomorrow!

    ReplyDelete
  28. I got it! I'm sure they are going to call me today.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Don't know why they'd call you Today when they can call you Al.

      Delete
    2. You can call me Betty only if I'm dressed as my aunt.

      Delete
  29. In a shocking development, the following anagram has been endorsed by the Society To Rehabilitate Anagram Puzzles: TRUMP IMPEACHMENT → THUMP MANIC TEMPER

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Darn, I must not have gotten my ballot. Please check my address.

      Delete
    2. TRUMP MEN EMPHATIC → (NO) TRUMP IMPEACHMENT.

      Delete
    3. MJ: Ballot? Have you been in a coma for 3 years?

      Delete
    4. Sorry. I as just wondering how STRAP comes by its "endorsements."
      Founder and CEO has sole vote?

      Delete
    5. The founder will check your address if you address your check appropriately...

      These are TRUMP TIMES!!!! At least for the moment.

      Delete
  30. Happy Stanislav Petrov Day to everyone who's still alive.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Here's a concise article on that undersung hero. Those were terrifying times.

      Delete
    2. These still are. We still have way more nuclear weapons than we had during the Cuban Missile Crisis, when a civilization-ending nuclear war was also averted by a single man. Coincidentally, I'm in the middle of enjoying Daniel Ellsberg's recent book on his role as a nuclear war planner.

      Delete
    3. Finished the Ellsberg book. I recommend it, though it's the scariest thing I've ever read.

      Delete
  31. Linguistically speaking, isn't Donald Trump more of a vice president than Pence?

    ReplyDelete
  32. PHONY & FAUX

    My Hint: “I am reminded of a popular type of restaurant.” Vietnamese Phở.

    ReplyDelete
  33. I wrote, “Press three.” Three is the digit on the phone that includes the letter E, “Phone E.”

    Strangely, this hint was posted, and I got a copy sent to my e-address, but then it disappeared, with not even an indication that it had been posted or or that it had been removed by our blog administrator. I didn’t re-post, fearing that it had been deemed too revealing (and if it was, I apologize).

    ReplyDelete
  34. PHONY, FAUX

    > It's not true that this is so tough.

    Phony, faux.

    > Wow, two Blainesvillagers in the soup with the blog administrator already!

    I'm a phan of pho.

    >> I am reminded of a popular type of restaurant.
    > I lucked out finding one in Portland last week.

    Had a great bowl of pho at Lúc Lác, on SW 2nd Ave.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The one in Seattle with a funny name is What the Pho? In Bellevue and pretty good.

      Delete
    2. Are you phoing with me? I learn so much on this site. Someday I will lay a wreath on Tommy's memorial and visit that famous Law office- which I could use right now by the way.

      Delete
    3. You may need to hurry. The Curious George shop that occupied the first floor of that building closed, and all the windows are boarded up. I think they may be getting ready to tear the place down.

      Delete
    4. Maybe you can get the sign for me.

      Delete
  35. PHONY = FAUX (PHO)

    Both adjectives describe Trump perfectly.

    FAUX NEWS → The alternate name for FOX NEWS NETWORK: opinions masquerading as news... (Fox Noise)

    ReplyDelete
  36. phony → faux

    It's almost unethical to give a clue. The puzzle includes "The first syllable phonetically sounds..." Removing the letters "eticall" ("almost" un-ethical) yields the answer.

    Blaine had written "homephone", was that phoney spelling? Don't mess with a 2nd grade spelling bee winner!

    I savor the thought of the multiple spellings of the 1 syllable word. Foe, Pho is usually a savory soup.

    Only sharp clues will pass the litmus test. Something registering ph 0 is very acidic, associated with a sharp taste.

    ReplyDelete
  37. My comment that Mason Adams portrayed Atom Man, enemy of Superman, was a reference to "foe." And my statement that he was a genuinely nice guy was a backwards reference to "phony."

    ReplyDelete
  38. There was a variation on this (7/9/11) involving a French movie director and a four letter adjective.

    ReplyDelete
  39. My clues -

    Using phonetics and reading both answer words backwards also gets you two words that describe views of Trump = Oaf and Enough!

    Second syllable has homophone with one letter in common = knee

    ReplyDelete
  40. In my dictionary, as well as many other dictionaries, the word "phony" is followed by "or phoney".

    Hey, 68Charger! I'm really looking forward to seeing what you said "appears to be a legitimate, alternate answer".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. E&WF - Nah, my answer of course, didn't work. I was thrown by the wording of this puzzle, and I realized my mistake Tuesday night when my sister came up with the right answer!
      I saw this riddle, at first, as taking the mystery word and using its two vowels as separate words, the first one being a synonym of the second one. There are all kinds of words that might fit this. I bet I re-read this puzzle 10 times as I tried to double check myself.
      Anyway, one of my answers was: "ALONE", "A" and "LONE"!
      I was kind of aggravated because I still think the wording of this puzzle could have been a little more specific. Plus, of course, everyone's clues pointed to the true answer. Oh well!!
      The moral of this story is to always listen to your sister!!

      Delete
    2. BTW, that should have been "its two syllables as separate words".

      Delete
  41. Blaine would you kindly explain your clue? For the life of me I can’t figure it out!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I thought "homophones" was his clue to PHONY (and FAUX.)

      Delete
    2. I thought FO-rest was a clue. But I've learned not to spend much time trying to decipher Blaine's clues.

      Delete
    3. I interpreted Blaine's clue as "I was so focused on homophones like "ewe" and "you" and "aye/eye" and "I" that I couldn't see the forest for the trees."

      Delete
  42. 68Charger was technically correct.

    Adjective in 5 letters and two syllables - Alone
    The first syllable (A) sounds like a synonym of the five letter word, Either a long “a” or short “a” sounds like “a” (again short or long a), which is itself a synonym for alone. Both a and Alone can mean “singular.” Or one could interpret Will’s clue as meaning that a is a synonym for lone, also a synonym for alone. A and lone have no letters in common.

    Ambiguities in drafting are assessed against the drafter. So, I think 68 Charger should get full credit.


    ReplyDelete
  43. Haven't participated here for an unconscionably long time--thinking of getting back into it. Something that's been on my mind lately: has anyone, to the collective knowledge of folks here, ever done a humorous dialog pointing out how weird it might sound if we used regularly in conversation all those four-letter words we seldom see outside of crossword puzzles? Maybe take that as a friendly challenge if you're feeling creative...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Whilst asea aboard the Argo, sailing from Adak to Attu, I did espy an erne, despite the stye above my eye. I ran to the alee side to grab my etui, my epee and my snee (given by an emir of olde), an ewer of mead, and several obis for Smee, one of the tars. "Psst," I said to Toto and Asta, "keep watch on the emus and asps, as well as the ibis. Lest this rime be less Omoo and more olio!"

      Delete
    2. And as far as I know, Eero never drew an ogee!

      Delete
  44. OMG do people expect me to remember how to format? I'm too sloe. But tell me, was the erne ecru?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How could I forget ecru?

      Oona knows how to format. To make a bold statement, type "<" followed by "b", followed by ">". No quotation marks. To unbold type the same with a "/" in front of the b. I do a double < b > which seems to make it darker.

      Doing the same with "i" gets you italicized. Typing hyperlinks is harder, years ago we tried to train your city-mate skydiveboy, but to no avail.

      Delete
  45. What's remarkable about this set of words?

    BIOLOGY
    DEATHLY
    SLOSHED
    BASTARD
    SELVAGE
    FISSILE
    DALLIES
    FLAVORS

    Click HERE, only if you give up.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I already clicked THERE, read the answer, and I still give up.

      Delete
    2. I think its pretty straightforward. It is something like a letter or number grid.

      Delete
    3. Each word has one & only one letter in common with all the other words IN THE SAME POSITION:
      BIOLOGY
      Bastard
      fIssile
      slOshed
      dalLies
      flavOrs
      selvaGe
      deathlY

      Delete
  46. Natasha:
    Pacific Northwest Ballet had their opening night of the new season last night. It was amazing!

    https://www.pnb.org/season/carmina-burana-agon/

    ReplyDelete
  47. This week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from listener Dorothy Baker of Dallas. Think of a word that has five vowels — two E's, an I, O, and U. Curiously, every vowel except the "I" is pronounced like a short "I." And the "I" in the word is not pronounced at all. What word is it?

    ReplyDelete
  48. I'd like to say that I am an example. --Margaret G.

    ReplyDelete
  49. I don't know about Duckduckgo, but you could search Google or Yahoo for an example.

    ReplyDelete
  50. 336 correct responses last week.

    ReplyDelete
  51. This is a good one.
    At least, I got the "Oh! Wow, yeah!" feeling when I got the answer.

    Will may be right that it's challenging -- I feel like it either hits you, or it doesn't, so solvers are going to be slaves to fortune.

    ReplyDelete
  52. I'm sensing a bit of bad luck with this one.

    ReplyDelete