Sunday, October 13, 2019

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Oct 13, 2019): Igpay Atinlay Everagesbay

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Oct 13, 2019): Igpay Atinlay Everagesbay:
Q: Think of an informal term for a beverage. Say it in Pig Latin and you'll have an informal term for another beverage. What are they?
I have about 5 answers.

Joe DiMaggio was known as "Mr. Coffee" for his series of commercials for the coffee maker. His retired jersey number was 5.
A: JOE (Coffee) --> O.J. (Orange Juice)

130 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. A Corona feels right later. Or not. Since you don't have to think hard for this week's puzzle, here's a Bonus Riff off last week's On-Air Challenge:
    Last week's on-air challenge featured 5 letter words that could add 2 letters to form 7 letter words. This week, can you find a common 7 letter word that has the following properties:
    1) Removing the last 2 letters results in a 5 letter word
    2) Removing the first 2 letters results in a 5 letter word
    3) The middle 3 letters are a word
    4) Removing the middle 3 letters results in a 4 letter word

    All are very common English words. None of the words are related to each other.

    For example, "browned" → brown(ed), (br)owned, own, and bred would work, except several of the derived words are related.

    I have two answers that work (there may be more), but in addition for one of the answers:
    5) Removing the 1st letter results in a 6 letter word
    6) Removing the 2nd letter results in a 6 letter word
    7) The 2nd through 5th letters are a 4 letter word
    8) Removing the 2nd through 5th letters results in a 3 letter word
    9) The 2nd through 4th letters are a common male name
    10) Removing the 2nd through 4th letters results in a 4 letter word.

    None of those words are unusual, though some are not as commonly used. Other words can be derived from the 7 letter word, but we have to stop somewhere! Some might use a computer to solve this; try first to use your noggin.

    I offered this to Will Shortz, who wrote "not sure I love it quite enough to use it on the air ... will be interested to see how the Blainesvillians do on it."

    Take that as your challenge, please no answers until Thursday, clues welcome, and let everyone (and Will) know you've solved it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have the two words. I will post Thursday morning because I will be flying off on a vacation & will not be able to post at 3:00 pm EDT. I will not be able to post anything until Tuesday of the following week.

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    2. Found a word that fulfills all the conditions (1)-(10). Moving the last letter of this familiar word three letters earlier in the alphabet yields a less-familiar 7-letter word that fulfills all conditions except (6) [the (5) word is very unfamiliar and (8) not very familiar]. Of course, with the different last letter, the words in (2), (4), and (10) are also different, but still very familiar.

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    3. SHALLOT: 1.allot 2. shall 3. all 4. shot.

      SHALLOW : 1. allow 2. shall 3. all 4. show 5. hallow 6. sallow 7. hall 8. sow 9. Hal 10. slow.

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    4. The Pig Latin Challenge: "coffee" → "orange juice." Sorry to post this early. See everyone back here next Tuesday.

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    5. Umm, bad enough that you feel compelled to reveal the Bonus Answer, but your revealing the NPR puzzle must be deleted. Oh for that power!

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    6. I came up with SHALLOW & BROWNIE and stopped there.

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    7. OWNIE is not a familiar word (not in MWCD10 or Wiktionary).

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    8. Would you consider OWNIE to be a common word?

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    9. I know. It is a slang word and according to Urban Dictionary it's a special friend.

      I earlier came up with another word with the same problem of a slang word in the same position that I had never heard of before, but it is so disgusting my late grandmothers did not even use it, so I don't think Blaine would appreciate it being posted here.

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    10. Geofan beat me to it, too distracted here.

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  3. I started working on the puzzle in bed and after I arose I got it very quickly.

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  4. I have the answer but the website isn't showing the puzzle yet. Should we wait?

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  5. I'm just an ordinary person, but I have n answer. I'll run with it.

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  6. Even at this ridiculous hour of the AM on a Sunday, the answer came to me instantly. (Its rare that I get the answer this quickly)

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  7. Moe : Boy, are you umday!

    Curly : Oh, you mean I'm Umday in pig language?

    Moe : You're umday in any language.

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  8. Replies
    1. Utilefay ursuitpay ithway ourway alpay Illway

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    2. There are currently 15 boroughs in the city of Oslo

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    3. Is Oslo on the North Sea?

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    4. Nordberg is a neighbourhood in Nordre Aker in Oslo

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    5. Scarborough is on the North Sea also. How interesting is that?

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    6. Even though I have no clue what this mini-thread is about, I will answer the question "How interesting is that?" with: Fairly.

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  9. I can't think of any hint! But I had both within the last 24 hours.

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  10. It's okay to prick your finger, but not to...

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  11. It took me longer as I believe one of the terms hasn’t been widely used for more than half a century. I thought I was going to have to take my old Italian grandpa’s favorite advice, “If-a you don’t get it, you must-a quit.”

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  12. There are several kinds of Pig Latin. My favorite as a kid made piasig liastiasin.

    Looks like Willy got his secret remuneration tied to number of responses.

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  13. Just saw this correction on NPR puzzle site: "In a previous Web version of this summary, we incorrectly gave the answer to last week's challenge as businesswoman. It was businesswomen." Did anyone notice the error?
    Cannot submit answer yet as new puzzle not posted.

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    Replies
    1. You can submit now. It doesn't matter if the new puzzle is not yet posted

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    2. Ron: Thanks. Already done. Wonder why puzzle not posted yet. Maybe intern took Columbus Day weekend off. No chance of getting chosen anyway as lottery probable done for later in the week submissions.

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  14. I have the answer, but I like Toddy → Oddity.

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  15. It took a little extra concentration on the wording but I’ve got it now. Love being aboard with the solvers.

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  16. Domine, defende nos contra hos motores bos.

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  17. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  18. As maddening it can be to struggle for nearly two weeks trying to solve a puzzle - as in the M(out)H one from awhile back - it felt a little ungratifying to solve this one instantly. Good thing there are some Bonus Puzzles to look at!

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  19. Got it! now time for a Anqueraytay.

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  20. Legolambda would know the answer to this puzzle.

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  21. Clever and relatively easy. I had to go to Canton for an answer.

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  22. Replies
    1. Clever hints, Bobby and Ben.

      LegoWhoAlsoEnjoyedJyqm'sHintBelow

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    2. Thank you. I was obviously calling out to Mrs. Robinson from Simon and Garfunkel, which asked "Where have you gone, Joe DiMaggio...."

      But rumors are that neither Lego nor Eleanor Roosevelt was available for filming, so they asked about DiMaggio instead.

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  23. I have not had either beverage this month, but I can relate.

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  24. For those who seek the definition of "beverage" in this week's puzzle challenge, we go to our news feed.

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  25. The first beverage is known by many names, but to me it is aqua-vitae. As to the second, it leaves a bitter taste in my mouth.

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  26. It’s been years since the Jets and the Bills met on a Monday night.

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  27. I think we all owe Will Shortz a grate det ov gratitood for presenting uz with such a sofistikated puzzle.

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  28. Special Double Bonus Puzzle: (don't you feel lucky?)

    What is the English linguistic significance of the expression "taois"?

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  29. I think there is a problem with the link to where you submit an answer. (It links to a transcript of yesterday's puzzle.) If you are having the same problem, try https://help.npr.org/customer/portal/emails/new?i=7&s=puzzle%20idea

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    Replies
    1. Never submit! Fight to the death!

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    2. SDB: I just wrote to NPR about sunday puzzle not posted with place for submission of answer. Maybe NPR does not want us to submit either!

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    3. Or more likely it is due to a short sighted minion who needs to take a trip to Binyon.

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  30. One of the two beverages I've never had. I'll let you guess which one.
    Such an easy puzzle this week! Sometimes trying to solve these things is murder.

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  31. This puzzle was easy. Easy like Sunday morning.

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  32. Hope you northern Californians are all ok in the 4.7 earthquake. You've been through enough this past week.

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    Replies
    1. A 4.7 is moderate, not as much shaking as a fun house, but you definitely notice it. Of this gang Blaine is likely the closest to the epicenter in Walnut Creek, and the shaking would be strongest for him - it was pretty mild for me, 13 miles away, a few seconds of a rattling roll. No damage, none expected.

      Closer to the epicenter it comes more as a short, sharp, shock (thank you Pink Floyd). The local news channels were on at the time, they felt it and simply couldn't stop talking about it - even though they are even farther away, +/- 21 miles. Though at least one of them is on Bay infill soil, which magnifies the shaking.

      The rest of us just go on with life in the land of Shake and Bake.

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    2. The USGS has a response page for reporting your experience with each quake. This one has had 70,000+ of them in three hours, all minor.
      A 4.7 has to centered under my bed at that time of day to be felt.

      I don't think Pig Latin has much currency with younger folks.
      I was hoping for some feedback on my post about Piasig Liasatiasin, a form adding "ee ah s" to every syllable.
      More common, if you could call it that, was adding "op" to get Popig Lopatopin (say it out loud).
      There were others, but I think they might be of the 78 RPM era.

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    3. My daughter had a friend that felt the 2.5 quake in the same area about 10 minutes earlier. We did feel the 4.5 (4.7?) quake. Noticable but nothing like the the Loma Prieta in 1989 (6.9?).

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    4. Felt a few seconds of small rattles in berkeley.

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    5. That would not be unusual if you happened to be walking thru a nursery.

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  33. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  34. This is not intended as a clue (or an answer), but there's a French puzzle that ought to be constructed relating a coffee ingredient (l'eau) and a suffix for coffee with ingredients (au lait). Just thought it was cool that these two common phrases are related via Pig Latin.

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  35. Pretty sure no one needs a clue by now. So I’m off to help find the real killer!!!!

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  36. JOE, OJ (OJAY) for COFFEE and ORANGE JUICE

    Yes, folks still say joe for coffee. We have a Cuppa Joe coffee place in Breckenridge, CO.

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  37. Joe & OJ slang for coffee and orange juice.

    I think we all had the good taste not to hint with that Simpson fellow who was so clever with a knife, nor that vile idiot with her orange juice song—Anita Bryant

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  38. Beverage Joe (as in cup of Joe)
    Pig Latin O-Jay (OJ, slang for orange juice)

    As a six-cup a day black coffee drinker, coffee is my water of life, my aqua vitae.
    OJ, on the other hand, even after 24 years, leaves a bitter taste in my mouth.

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    Replies
    1. A bitter taste after 24 years? Brushing your teeth might help.

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    2. Funny, my OJ taste was more acidic than bitter ;-).

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  39. JOE, O.J.

    > I think a lot of people will get the answer before getting out today.

    During breakfast, say.

    > The on-air puzzle consisted of familiar phrases of the form "blank to the blank", where Will supplied the word that goes in the first blank. One of them was "cut to the chase", I think.

    As in a slow speed white Bronco chase. Or, Chase and Sanborn.

    > Take the formal name for the second beverage. Drop the first part and add a word to name a singer with a hit song whose last word is associated with the two answer beverages. Then, to tie in to last week's puzzle, replace the first part of the singer's name with something else in the same category as the first part of the formal name for the second beverage to name something tasty to eat. Convoluted enough?

    Orange juice -> Juice Newton ("Angel of the Morning") -> Fig Newton

    > The two worked together.

    Here's what Broadway JOE had to say about it on Howard Stern's show.

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  40. Joe—>O. J.


    “I had to go to Canton for an answer.”

    The musical group O’Jays formed in Canton, Ohio (and, as an afterthought, the Steelers’ “Mean” Joe Greene is enshrined in Canton’s Pro Football Hall of Fame).

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  41. How is it I never heard of OK soda before this week?

    I know nothing about Norwegian neighborhoods, but the word BOROUGH made me think about a certain news/talk show host.

    Thanks to Blaine for ruling in my favor on the admissibility of my opening statement. I had doubts.

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    Replies
    1. Paul, what was your opening statement? I dozed off a bit there.

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    2. I left an encoded message Sunday morning at the end of last weeks's blog. I thought "I have an answer that doesn't quite fit. I'll keep looking for the real answer." might be too revealing. Blaine obviously found it innocent enough, because he divulged the keyword, REASONABLE.

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    3. That didn't clear things up for me, whether unreasonable or reasonable.

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  42. Joe → OJ

    A Corona feels right later. Or not The band Starbuck was also known as Korona and their most famous song was "Moonlight Feels Right."

    Do they speak Pig English in Latin America? Most of our coffee and orange juice comes from Latin American countries, English pig dogs!.

    Bonus Answer 1: The intended answer for the first puzzle was SHALLOW, with SHALLOT working for the primary items. Other words that work for the first 4 criteria include BROWNER, SHEARED and SPEARED, but the solution words are related.


    SHEARED also satisfies some of the additional criteria, as in "Maw, I dun heared the Pressydent is comin' 'round town! Set the young 'uns in the barn and hep me find mah teeth!"

    Bonus Answer 2: According to Wikipedia, the letters T-A-O-I-S are, in order, the most frequently used first letters of English words.

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  43. I saw that they wrote businesswoman, but given their lack of response on the Haiti - Thai Vietnam fiasco a month earlier there was no reason to march in protest.

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    Replies
    1. They wrote a correction for women a week later.

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  44. Replies
    1. Joe is coffee. OJ is orange juice. Another way that the 5 in Blaine's comment is related to this puzzle is that the 5 ball in pool is orange.

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  45. JOE(coffee), OJ(orange juice)
    I probably don't need to explain my "murder" comment.

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  46. My clues:

    “It took a little extra concentration” was a reference to concentrated OJ
    “Love being aboard with the solvers” was reference to Love Train by the ojays.

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  47. Blaine,
    Didn't Mr. Coffee machines and Joe DiMaggio also have in common that they fired up as they approached the plate?

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  48. If the Turkish President is Merde-One, then is Trump #2?

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  49. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  50. I had written to NPR about the puzzle not posted on the site I normally look at. Received a reply two days ago thanking me and informing me that they just posted it.
    What took so long?

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  51. I'm ashamed to say I missed the obvious and didn't the puzzle but I'm very proud today to be a lifelong Astros fan.

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  52. I just finished watching an Argentinian movie on DVD (Chinese Takeaway) that I happened to run across in the library that was made in 2011. I had not heard of this film and was not expecting much, but since it didn't cost anything to check out, I took it home.

    I cannot let this moment go by without recommending this movie to everyone here. It is exceptional and will take your mind off all the shit happening in the world today. It truly is a gem not to be missed.

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  53. This sounds good. It is listed as _Chinese Take-Out_ at the IMDB. Thanks!

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    1. Rob, You are right, but most show it as Chinese Takeaway, including the copy I obtained. It is also: Un Cuento Chino in Spanish. I could not find the title in Urdu.

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    2. Cuento is story in English so "A Chinese story." I will look for it. Never heard of it.

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    3. SDB 'You might enjoy documentary new on Clive Davis " Soundtrack of our times.' I watched last night. From Janis Joplin to Mr. Big.

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  54. This week's challenge: This challenge comes from listener Sandy Kutin of Princeton, N.J. Think of a 7-letter past tense verb for something good you might have done in a football game. Move each letter one space later in the alphabet (so A becomes B, B becomes C, etc.), and rearrange the result. You'll get a past tense verb for something bad you might have done in football. What words are these?

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    Replies
    1. Another giant waste of time.

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    2. Done. At least it's not much time.

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    3. If you have the answer before he finishes the question does it count as wasted time?

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    4. I suppose, Boredom is the price you pay for cerebral acumen.

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