Sunday, August 23, 2020

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Aug 23, 2020): Where in the World?

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Aug 23, 2020): Where in the World?
Q: Think of a place on earth with a four-word name. Take the third word. Advance three of its letters to the next letter of the alphabet (so A would become B, B would be come C, etc.). You'll get the fourth word in the name. What place is this?
Ask someone to point to this on a map and they'll probably get it wrong.

Edit: Many people believe this to be the southernmost point of Africa but it's actually not.
A: CAPE OF GOOD HOPE (G>H, O>P, D>E)

175 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. More than 1300 correct responses this week.

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  3. There is a linkage, albeit a faint one, between this week’s puzzle and last week’s.

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    1. Not sure what you're thinking of, but there's an interesting link between the on-air player and the answer.

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    2. Can’t say any more here without violating Blaine’s Prime Directive. You’ll have to email me or wait until Thursday for enlightenment.

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    3. A very faint link - it makes me think of Vitruvius!

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  4. Most people do not know where this place is...

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  5. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    1. My bad. Should have googled it first.

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    2. Go Ikeys! was removed by an administrator. Ikey is a slang term used to refer to students of The University of Cape Town. In the intervening time since I was a student there, I see that the rugby team has taken on the moniker ‘Ikey Tigers’ of which I was totally unaware, and it is the only internet reference I see that links the term to South Africa. Was just so super excited that I solved the puzzle in under 30 seconds that I neglected to do an internet search first. Apologies to all.

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    3. Go Ikeys! was removed by an administrator. Ikey is a slang term used to refer to students of The University of Cape Town. In the intervening time since I was a student there, I see that the rugby team has taken on the moniker ‘Ikey Tigers’ of which I was totally unaware, and it is the only internet reference I see that links the term to South Africa. Was just so super excited that I solved the puzzle in under 30 seconds that I neglected to do an internet search first. Apologies to all.

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  6. Reminds me of someone interesting who died this month who had a significant connection to the answer.

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  7. I am encouraged that the answer I came up with is the correct answer.

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  8. Take a word that means the opposite of the last word in the answer. Anagram. You get requirements for a specific stage, or stages, of life.

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  9. Even if you have the answer, be sure to wear a mask.

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  10. Rearrange the combined letters of the place to get, not a chapelet, but rather the name of a poet, the name of a bruin, and another name for a GI.

    LegoWhoNotesAlasThatRosariesLikelyDidNotYetExistDuringTheLifetimeOfSaintBede

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    1. I have to do the appetizer first on Puzzleria first or risk gastronomic implosion?

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  11. Is the fourth word only the three advanced letters or is it the entire third word, including the three advanced letters?

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    1. The 3rd and 4th words have the same number of letters, and differ only in the 3 advanced ones.

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  12. On this day in 2005 Hurricane Katrina formed over the Bahamas, and later became a category 5 hurricane.

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  13. I initially had trouble with this, but if I’m understanding Lancek’s clue, it’s my favorite one thus far.

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    1. Yes, Lancek's clue is elegant.

      Elego

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    2. 1. I like Snipper's clue!
      2. I misread legolambda's clue and wondered why Blaine hadn't taken it down.
      3. And yes, Lancek's clue is very nice.

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    3. Although, come to think of it, Lancek's clue would seem even more perfect if you were in the middle of it!

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  14. Thankfully it is not La Brea Tar Pits again.

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  15. I can't find Radio City Music Hall on a map.

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  16. I anticipate I have the right answer, though I am not at all familiar with the place.

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  17. The best hint was, "think of a place with a four word name." After that you just have to check the math.

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  18. Hard to say which hint most deserves to be lauded. My opinion is superfluous, anyway. I'll let everyone do their own boasting on Thursday.

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    1. "Do their own boasting" is a paraphrase of a familiar expression that might point one to another spot on the globe that people like me sometimes confuse with this week's answer.
      "Lauded" is a synonym of another anagram of the opposite of the last word of the answer.
      I think an explanation of "superfluous" is unnecessary.

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  19. I tried the procedure with the first place that came to mind.
    Then I went back to sleep.

    Maybe WS could start without such giveaway phrasing and then post hints M-W on the web site.
    One could argue that that would make the game too easy. No danger of that.

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  20. My wife, Dolores, helped me with this one.

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  22. Only 1300 correct last week - very surprising given how easy it was to research the answer.

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  24. I sincerely wish that everyone solves it this week.

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  25. Some prescient remarks by SDB on last weeks thread.

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  26. I have my own puzzle which maybe anyone here can shed some light on. My husband and I enjoy playing the puzzle each week and usually one of us solves it (We each have played on the air!) Here’s the puzzle: We live on the East Coast Where the puzzle is on NPR at 8:40 AM (though we often play using the website later in the morning). We have noticed that Blaine consistently has an answer before the puzzle has aired as far as we understand. This week, for instance, Blaine’s clue was posted at 5:40 AM. I am assuming he is posting from the West Coast. So perhaps the show airs even earlier where he is, but the real question is how can he come up with the answer so quickly every single week? ! Blaine...Anyone?

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  27. Easy one!
    Sometimes NPR interns will publish the puzzle on their website earlier than it first airs. Blaine is on the Best Coast (sic) and 5:40 is 8:40 back there in D.C.

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    1. Ok, so that explains how he can blog early, but it does not explain how he solves these puzzles seemingly instantly! I don’t know about you, but some of the puzzles take a while to solve And sometimes neither one of us can solve it at all. So how does Blaine ALWAYS come up with the answer so quickly?!

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    2. Whip smart, good computer tools...and on occasion, Blaine doesn't solve them straight away.

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    3. My theory is that Blaine is actually Will Shortz and they are both actually Q.

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    4. That's funny because I was just about to post that as far as I know no one has ever seen Blaine and Will Shortz together.

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    5. I always wondered why I never get called to play on the air. My being Will Shortz would explain it. :)

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    6. All superheroes have mild-mannered alter-egos, don't they?

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    7. Here is what I wrote on October 3, 2019:
      Is Blaine Blainevoyant?
      No. He is, in fact... Will Shortz!
      Just ask Clark a pseudonym how this could be possible...
      Blaine Kent resides in the fictional American city of Blainesville, where he works as a censor for the Daily Post-it. To protect his privacy, this mild-mannered comment-bleeper changes into his cruciverbalist-matrix costume and uses the alias "Puzzlemaster" whenever he pings his pong or purveys his weekly posers.
      In his persona as "Puzzlemaster" Blaine has many foes, including:
      * Mendo Jim, his archenemy and Blainesville resident curmudgeon,
      * ecoarchitect, anagram-pooh-pooher and founder of S.T.R.A.P. (Society To Repress Anagram Puzzles),
      * and Seattle-based skydiveboy-genius, who finds the Puzzlemaster's challenges to be such a snap that he solves them while still lollygagging in bed Sunday mornings – before he can even yawn, stretch or rub the sleep from his wise eyes!

      LegoLuthorDastardlyInventorOfSecondRatePuzzlesThatRiffOffThePuzzlemaster

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    8. And, for those who pooh-pooh the notion that Blaine and Will are one and the same, I posted the following this past December 23:
      Here is how I imagine what happens in the Blaine household early every Sunday morning:
      Blaine and members of his beautiful and wonderful family are gathered around the kitchen breakfast nook table. Their radio, of course, is tuned to NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday.
      As the opening drumbeat of "The Puzzle" sounds, all ears perk up (like the family "Auto-Perc" Coffee Maker) and turn toward their radio's speaker, like sunflowers toward the sun.
      This week's puzzle is proving to be a toughie. Pads and pencils begin cropping up on the table. So do dictionaries, thesauri, almanacs, encyclopedia volumes. The tabletop becomes obscured by a panicky blur of riffled pages and crumpled discarded scrap papers!
      "Any ideas yet?" Blaine implores, sweat glistening on his furrowed brow. "It's been nearly 15 minutes! My loyal Blainesvillians are awaiting my hint... one they can gripe about and whine that they don't have a clue about what I am getting at!

      LegoWho(SeriouslyNow)IsAmazedByHowRegularlyAndReliablyBlaing(WithPresumablySometimesTheHelpOfFamilyMembers)ProvidesUsWithAPromptPackageIncludingPuzzleTextCleverGraphicAndIngeniousHint

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    9. Has Blaine never been stumped?

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    10. My theory is that on Saturday, Blaine charges up the Flux Capacitor in his Delorean. Then, shortly after midnight (although the time doesn’t really matter) he accelerates to Thursday afternoon. Once then, he reads the posts on this blog, selects the most probable answer, and returns to Sunday, in time to tee up the weekly challenge.

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    11. (Delorean was the answer to Unknown's spinoff puzzle last week.)

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    12. When he went bankrupt, Delorean sold his Bedminster, NJ, estate to Donald Trump, who turned it into his country club / golf course. He lived his last 5 years in Morristown, NJ. When I used to bike in the area on weekends (including after his death), I'd sometimes see a Delorean on the road that cuts through the Great Swamp. Wonder if it belonged to a family member?

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    13. References to old Deloreans are often timely....

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    14. Hey Legolamed, are you absolutely certain that one of the words in your anagram of the puzzle answer was not a poet but a poem? Because I got the GI word (my dad was one in WWII) I got the reference to the bruin.
      But the remaining letters I could only fit to a poem, not a poet.
      FromunknownwholovedyourrosarylinkandappologizesinadvanceifthispointhasalreadybeencoveredorifIreadyourpostwrongly.

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    15. Back in July 1993 I had a Tandem skydiving student on one of our San Juan Islands who owned 2 Deloreans. He was much older than I and I got to ride around in one of them while there. I still prefer Mercedes.

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    16. Deloreans were novel back in the 70's and 80's, but probably by the 1990s they were passe. It be cool to drop one out an airplane with parachutes attached and hit the ground running!

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    17. In response to Unknown's query: I found that Lego's three-word anagram worked perfectly. If you get the GI word right, the bruin and the poet should be pretty obvious from the scraps left over.

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    18. I love your DeLorean-time-travel theory to explain Blaine's uncanny puzzle-solving proficiency, SuperZee.
      And, jan, I enjoyed/but-was-saddened-by your nugget about the Delorean estate ending up in the grubby little hands of our very-Biff-like bully who, for now at least, occupies the Oval Office.

      LegoWhoBelievesThatTimeTravelerBlaineHasGottaGetBackInTimeToPostHisEarlySundayHint

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    19. Hey Lancek, yes! I get it now. Just a matter of an extra letter that belongs at the end of the bruin!
      Thanks, Lego, thanks Lancek!

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    20. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    21. Leaving off the letter at the end of the bruin is understandable. Reminds me of an old rhetorical question about bruins in their natural habitats.

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  28. Does anyone one have any thoughts about the American Flag with black white and blue stripes? I looked it up and came away angry as hell

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    1. I hadn't heard about that flag until your post. Thanks for posting it. I thought I kept up with things pretty well, but perhaps I'm not getting out enough these days. One would think there is a pandemic or something.

      Nothing the police do surprises me any more, and for a very long time now. I do not understand why so many are opposed to defunding the police; they never seem to come when we call 911 anyway.

      Have you read the Kenosha, WI news today?

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    2. Sonebody once told me that the darker the flag, the more right wing the organiztion. Such as the American Legion flag.

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  29. Replies
    1. Blaine,
      I posted the above because I thought there was a post (and still is) this morning that you would remove if you saw it. Am I missing something here?

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    2. In my experience, the answer to "am I missing something here?" , is always (and perhaps tautologically), YES.

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    3. Iris posted a flurry of comments that were all variations in the same theme. I missed that one.

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    4. Yes, 3 at least. She also removed a different giveaway herself and then posted a shorter version. I was watching last night to see how long it would take for you to see her second one. You got it quickly. I happened to see it right after she posted it, but did not want to call attention to it; same thing this morning. I thought maybe you were too busy working, or white water rafting, or fighting fires to see it today.

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  30. I solved it! Finally! Thanks to Saint Bartholomew. Today is his holy day, which is a good clue to solving this puzzle! Will explain Thursday.

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  31. I got the last bits, it's: Something Something Turgid Tushie.

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    1. An excellent name for a nude beach! I checked to see whether there was one in ORLEANS, MA, to tie in to last week's puzzle, but, alas, the only nearby ones had boring names like Longnook, Ballston, Mashpee, and Head of the Meadow.

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  32. https://www.brade.zone/2008/09/13/boring/

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  33. A certain Superhero comes to mind

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  34. Mr. Ben may disagree with me,but she is my favorite bass player of all time.

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    1. Before I tell you who is your favorite bass player of all time, can you tell me who you are referring to, above?

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  35. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  36. My alternate answer: SITE OF WLSR XMTR (somewhere near Galesburg, IL)

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  37. The answer rhymes with something that actually did not happen to a famous now deceased comedian.

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  38. I live just one block from Seattle's largest cemetery. It does it all and even has it's own crematorium. Over the years I have gotten to know several of the employees and they frequently tell me what may be going on behind the scenes there. Today I was informed the crematorium workers were upset over something, but I never did find out what they were all fired up about.

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    1. I hear people are dying to get in there.

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    2. Well, yes it is a poplar place, but I'd die before I would let them bury me there. I would rather die than be buried in that cemetery!

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    3. Right. Most of the residents are deaf nightly and daily too.

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    4. jan, Shouldn't they put little bells on the toes of corpses as they slip them into body bags, just in case? Now, I never will get back to sleep. I think I have a little bell around here someplace...

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    5. Maybe they should do a better job of teaching paramedics how to check a pulse. Or look for a disconnected lead when your monitor shows a flat line. Anyway, we need little bells for when we go walking in the woods, to keep the bears away.

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    6. When I am walking in the woods I use a compass for taking bearings.

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  39. My inlaws are in Lakeview on c
    Capital hill. right next to Princess Angeline. You may be close to Northwest Hospital on 15th N.W.?
    Bruce Lee and his son are also at Lakeview. Yea it's to die for.

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  40. As human beings, we have a natural compulsion to fill empty spaces. - Will Shortz (b. August 26, 1952)

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    1. Great quote! Thanks for the reminder.

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    2. Would it follow, then, that working to complete a crossword puzzle is a great undertaking?

      Lego(WhoDigsCrosswordPuzzles)

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  41. I was overthinking this one. Now I can focus on the Falwell (should be fall well) story. Say what?

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    1. I heard one person say, “Falwell fell badly.”

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  42. I forgot about this week’s puzzle until today. Makes me think of a pregnant German woman.

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  44. It appears there is a second solution ... my computer found it on a list of place names. I had never heard of it, but it seems to meet the terms of the puzzle statement.

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  45. Is anyone here watching the Lipstick On A Pig Convention? I cannot bring myself to that much self abuse.

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    1. No, I'm not...I have enough aggravation in my life. No CNN this week until its over.

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    2. I don't have access to cable stations, but have no interest in watching any of their lies. I did watch some of the Democratic convention last week.

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  46. Last minute clue: Comedy clue:

    Remember way back when Saturday Night Live was just getting started? Remember Chevy Chase as then President Gerald Ford talking about the Panama Canal with a world map behind him?

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    1. Pointing to South America, he talked about how, before the Panama Canal, that ships traveling from one coast to the other would have to travel around the southern tip of South America, around “the Cape of Good Horn”.

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    2. I don't remember that SNL bit, but it sounds like a blunder I could easily make.

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  47. CAPE OF GOOD HOPE

    My Hints:

    “Reminds me of someone interesting who died this month who had a significant connection to the answer.”

    Marvin Creamer died August 12th at 104 years old. Marvin Charles Creamer was an American college professor and sailor notable for being the first recorded person to have sailed around the globe without the aid of navigational instruments. Without a compass, sextant, watch, or other instrument. He sailed around both capes on his adventure.

    “The answer rhymes with something that actually did not happen to a famous now deceased comedian.” Rape of Bob Hope. For some unknown reason this kept popping into my head.

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  48. CAPE OF GOOD HOPE

    > It's 90 miles from where I thought it was.

    As Blaine later hinted, most people think it's at the southern tip of Africa.

    > There's an interesting link between the on-air player and the answer.

    Ben Bernard is from Cliff Island, Maine, which is part of Portland. The ferry connecting the two goes right past HOPE Island.

    > All superheroes have mild-mannered alter-egos, don't they?

    And CAPEs. They always wear CAPEs.

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  49. CAPE OF GOOD HOPE

    "B --> A" Benguela current >>> Agulhas current

    As jan and others referenced >>> from Wikipedia

    "Contemporary geographic knowledge instead states the southernmost point of Africa is Cape Agulhas about 150 kilometres to the east-southeast.The currents of the two oceans meet at the point where the warm-water Agulhas current meets the cold-water Benguela current and turns back on itself. That oceanic meeting point fluctuates between Cape Agulhas and Cape Point (about 1.2 kilometres (0.75 mi) east of the Cape of Good Hope)."

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  50. Cape of Good Hope.

    The link to last week’s puzzle is that last week, a number of the regulars had pointed out, that if it weren’t for COVID-19, some of us had planned to meet in Brewster, Mass this summer. Our planned meeting place is just down the road from the town of Orleans on Cape Cod.

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  51. CAPE OF GOOD HOPE.

    G → H, O/O, O → P, D → E

    Most people think this is the southernmost tip of Africa, but it is not:

    Cape of Good Hope location

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  52. I submitted Cape of Good Hope.

    My clue was E,
    As in E, D, C, B, A,
    And A, B, C, D, E,
    D, C, B, A,
    Detective Comics, the start of BAtman,
    The Caped Crusader, bringing Hope to Gotham.
    A, B, C, D, E,
    Also Bill Clinton, the DEmocrat from Hope.

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  53. I wrote, “Take a word that means the opposite of the last word in the answer. Anagram. You get requirements for a specific stage, or stages, of life.” That’s DESPAIR and DIAPERS.

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    1. Your post made me think of my favorite vendor of corporate demotivators. I considered posting just "May not be warranted at this point."

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  54. Cape of Good Hope.
    1. Walla Walla, burial place for Hope Summers (also born there). She was Aunt Clare's good friend on Andy Griffith show and shares a wonderful birthdate with Ben and I.
    2. SDB comments last week mentioned the H word twice regarding a young man's speech.
    3. My favorite bassist- Esperanza Spalding from Portland, Oregon. Esperanza = hopeful. She has a couple of nice interviews on NPR. She is pretty great.

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  55. Fearing the wrath of Blaine, I refrained from posting “KLM pilot.”

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  56. Anyone found the second, far far ... far less well-known solution? I imagine you'll need a computer and some info off the Interweb.

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  57. I posted "I need this". I meant I could use a cape of good hope for coping these days.

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  58. I'd like to know the lesser well-known answer myself, but I'll wait for someone else to fugure it out.
    August 24th, for a good number of years anyway, has been the holy day of St. Bartholomew. The first Eurpean to sail through the COGP was Bartolomeu Dias, way back in 1488. Get it? St. Bartholomew's day and Bartolomeu Dias?

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  59. My clue -

    “I initially had trouble with this, but if I’m understanding Lancek’s clue, it’s my favorite one thus far.“

    “Initially” referred to Lancek’s purported reference to the answer’s initials- COGH - which looks like “cough” and why you should wear a mask if you have the answer! Very clever!

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    1. I took it more to wearing a cape, but still needing a mask.

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    2. I was thinking more of those folks who are denying science and relying on good hope. Plus, there's that comic book link between capes and masks. I really didn't think of COGH until your "initially" post!

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    3. Cape reminds me of Harry Potter and the cape that I think made him invisible. Capes in comic books too. Something protective, magical about capes. LIke the mask and cape interpretation of SDB. Except the mask covers the nose and mouth and not the eyes. We need a new comic book hero with that outfit!

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  60. CAPE OF GOOD HOPE(G=H, O=P, D=E)
    I had to reread the instructions to make sure that my answer worked. It was the first four-word place name that came to me.

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  61. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    1. I will try and do better this week after my 2/12.

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    2. (The following post is a corrected version of the one I deleted, above Plantsmith's post.)
      The answer to my riff-off puzzle:
      Rearrange the combined letters of the place to get, not a chapelet, but rather the name of a poet, the name of a bruin, and another name for a GI is:
      POE+POOH (as in "Winnie the")+DOGFACE...
      If you want MORE such puzzling, check out tonorrow's Puzzleria! (see Blaine's PUZZLE LINKS). Our feature guest-puzzle-maker will be ecoarchitect, who has concocted three of his excellent and unique "econfusions" for your "chewing-on" pleasure. They are really delicious!
      We also are serving up six GREAT "Cape of Good Hope" riff-offs, plus three other challenging morsels.
      Join us for the fun.

      LegoWhoInRetrospectShouldHaveSubstituted"Seal"For"Bruin"InHisCapeOfGoodHopeRiffOff

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  62. Putin must be furious looking at all those American flags behind the podium and not seeing one Russian flag among them.

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  63. I was sitting on my patio tonight and noticed not only the moon but some of our planets as well. I looked online and was informed we could see seven planets tonight. I took my binoculars and went out and believe I saw all of them. I don't mean to be vulgar, but Uranus was also visible.

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    1. On Thursday, in Seattle, Mercury and Venus set long before Uranus rose. When did you see those planets?

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    2. jan,
      It was getting dark, but I don't recall what time. I don't know which planets I actually saw either. I just kept seeing more of what were planets. I did use a 10X50 binoculars, but I could not read any signs saying their individual names. I didn't spend much time looking at the information on the web site, so that is all I know. I just found it interesting.

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    3. Heavens Above is a great resource for sky watchers.

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  64. I said this puzzle reminded me of a pregnant German woman. A (now rather old-fashioned) way of saying that someone is “expecting” in German is to say that she is “guter Hoffnung” — literally “of good hope.”

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    1. Thanks for that interesting linguistic nugget, Jyqm. Do German women perhaps wear elastic or adjustable-drawstring-waist maternity capes (or, rather KapsDerGutenHoffnung)?

      LegoLambabybauch!

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  65. A second solution is: Ban Khok Kham Lian -- Mukdahan region, Thailand

    As far as I can see, this meets all the criteria of the problem statement.

    Of course, as implicitly expected, "Ban Khok Kham Lian" is an Anglicized version of the actual name. So is "Cape of Good Hope", which is a translation of "Cabo da Boa Esperan├ža".

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    1. It will be interesting to see if it gets mention tomorrow. That will depend on whether or not the minion du jour passed it along to Will.

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    2. According to the PuzzleMaster, he records on Friday so if he heard about this second example, unless he heard on Thursday, it will not likely make it on the air.

      But it is quite astounding that there is a second site in Thailand that fits the mold!

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    3. Well, of course, it all depends on whether Rodolfo submitted his alternate answer during an intermission with Mimi.

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  66. Well, this is a tough one.
    I have been a relentless advocate of alternative answers here for many years and given the PM little support when he decides to deny one or claims he never heard it.
    His common "think of a famous..." or "of a well known..." place would have nixed Kam Khok Kham Lian with nary a thought.
    Since he left those off, that answer would technically be correct.
    Before I agree, I think I would like to know what it is, since it has almost no web presence.
    So Rudolfo: What is it? How big is it? how many people live there? Are there businesses there? What is its non-Anglicized name?

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  67. This week's challenge comes from listener Joe Young, of St. Cloud, Minn. Name a famous person in history (5,4). The letters of the last name can be rearranged to name a popular game. And the letters in the first name can be rearranged to name an action in this game. Who is this famous person?

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  68. Several games involved, actually.

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  69. I solved it right away, but not with the intended answer at first. Will explain Thursday.

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