Sunday, September 20, 2020

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Sep 20, 2020): What's in a Name?

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Sep 20, 2020): What's in a Name?
Q: Take the name of a famous actor — 4 letters in the first name, 5 letters in the last. Spoonerize it. That is, interchange the initial consonant sounds of the first and last names. The result will be two new familiar first names — one male, one female — that start with the same letter... but that letter is pronounced differently in the two names. Who's the actor?
Note: an actor can be a woman too.

Edit: Marion Michael Morrison (aka John Wayne) has a unisex first name of Marion. In addition, the image was of a Post-It Note made by 3M.
A: JOHN WAYNE --> JUAN, JANE

206 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. I solved it with the very first name that came to mind as I was still reading it.

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    1. That reminds me of the time that the answer was a "journalist," and the first name that occurred to cranberry was "Piers Morgan." I've come to accept that it will sometimes take me six days to stumble upon names that occur to others in six seconds.

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    2. Actually, now that I have the answer, I must admit that this could easily have been the first name to come to mind. Sorry to have compared it to the Piers Morgan epiphany.

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  3. Take the person’s full given name. Remove all letters that repeat. Rearrange. You get a kitchen gadget.

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    1. I always appreciate your follow-ups, Rob, but this is the second week in a row that you've stumped me. What were the two related words you intended last week, using MICHAEL+C? This week, when I remove all the letters that repeat from this actor's full given name, there ain't much left to rearrange.

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    2. Oh! I worded that one clumsily. Michael + C can be anagrammed in two different ways, both words related. That's what I meant to say! And the words are ALCHEMIC and CHEMICAL.

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    3. Cool. The best I could do was MAC and CHILE, using an alternate spelling of CHILI. Might there also be a more careful wording of your current challenge?

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  4. Got it. Congrats, ecoarchitect Greg!

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  5. Oooooh, not only did I get it right away, but I think I also get Blaine's clue!
    If you struggle with this one, though, keep at it. You'll break through in the end.

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    1. I think Blaine posted two clues.

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    2. I don't get Blaine's clue. I rarely do. I've only got it twice.

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  6. I think the on air contestant had a good time and also provided a clue.

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    1. Great observation, Snipper (or perhaps that should be "hearservation"). Pretty tough on-air puzzle; Danette Pachtner did well.
      And, congrats to eco, architect of puzzles both solid and beautiful.

      LegoWritingFromTheHomeStateOfBabeTheBlueOx

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    2. Yes, it took awhile on the road to AVENUE.

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  7. Congrats, Eco! It's a bit iffy, but whatever! Just another interesting factoid - this person has something in common with the previous week's answer, and it's not only that they're both actors. --Margaret

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  8. I had a similar initial reaction.

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  9. I suspect that the actor would not be happy about this puzzle...

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  10. Oops, I nearly forgot....Bravo Eco!

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  11. At first, I thought I had something in common with this person, but not at first.

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  12. The actor’s name reminds me of a 1966 James Brown hit. A last name associated with one of the spoonerized first names reminds me of the – then – social order.

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  13. How many ways to clue the movie for which the actor won an Oscar? It would take twenty minutes, I'd guess.

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    Replies
    1. Any self respecting southerner would agree

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    2. Got me right to it. Thank you!

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    3. (By that I mean, knowing the actor is an Oscar winner helped.)

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    4. Knowing he was an Oscar winner narrowed the search considerably.

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  14. To be honest, this took a little longer than recent ones, as a good puzzle should.

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  15. Very nice one, Eco! Getting the answer (after a false start) provided a sense of satisfaction often lacking in other puzzles.

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  16. I am thinking of a mid career movie this actor headlined. The first word in the title is a pronoun and the last two words are an object. If you change the pronoun to its opposite the title now describes how I think about this actor.

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    1. Did you change another word too?

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    2. Maybe my actor wrong. I like my answer though.

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    3. True. But cannot find any other one. I like the one I found that I changed two words to make go together correctly grammatically. If my actor incorrect, then it should be correct!

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    4. Is there a shortage of verbs today?

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    6. You: "Maybe my actor wrong..."

      sdb: "Maybe your movie wrong."

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    7. Remember in this form of "Spoonerism" the initial consonants are switched, not the initial syllables as in many common Spoonerisms. It is kisstomary to cuss the bride.

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    8. Ron: My answer follows the rule.

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    9. Spoonerisms really do not have strict rules. They are simply the switching of sounds.

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    10. My daughter loved to Spoonerise the name of a nearby road. She would call West Ox Road, Wet Socks Road.

      She learned to Spoonerise from me, when I called a friend, Sonny Fein, Funny Sign.

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    11. I think I may have posted this on this blog a few years ago, but it still merits another run:

      I was walking towards the deli section of a Kroger owned supermarket and when I happened to notice the Boar's Head sign I Spoonerised it and had difficulty not laughing out loud.

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  17. Mmm...a tasty puzzle. Nicely done, Eco.

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  18. There's an interesting (I think) irony involving a movie the actor produced, directed, and starred in, and the location of something named for the actor.

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  19. SDB,
    Once after I got over my envy of how quickly you solved this thing,in the end,I got it.Unfortunately,the Orange one and how he thinks came to mind

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  20. The actor has a lot in common with the person in the last puzzle.

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    1. First of all, John Wayne rhymes with Michael Caine. They were both born with the initials MM (John Wayne=Marion Morrison, Michael Caine=Maurice Micklewhite). Also, even though John Wayne's original middle name was Robert, it was later changed to Michael.

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  21. Last night I coined the following puzzle and sent it directly to Will Shortz, knowing it was very unlikely he would use it on NPR, but it was worth a try. His reply this morning confirmed my suspicions, therefore here it is for your amusement:

    Say the name of a well known movie of the past and phonetically it will describe what was done, at the end of his life, to the president who followed JFK into office. What was this movie?

    Please do not reveal the answer until Thursday's deadline so others may solve it too.

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    1. Isn’t that what we do to most dead people?

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    2. I've not heard of a movie called Barium.

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    3. Got it as I was still reading it.

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    4. Depends on vowel distortion to be phonetically accurate. But it's cute, even if not perfect.

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    5. I got this one. Still haven't figured out the on-air one yet.

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  22. Once again we are not dealing with a birth name.

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  23. So, how are everyone's Thanksgiving plans coming along, in this year of Covid?

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    1. Just like normal, except instead of cooking a 20 pound turkey, and serving it to 16 guests, my wife and I will be sharing a Rock Cornish Hen.

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    2. Nicely done, SZ.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9O8oLqY2sxo

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  24. The spouse of this actor might have used one of these names to refer to the actor in private. Hell, the spouse might have used both--who's to say?

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  25. I never considered this person a good actor. To me when a good actor is in a role, you are able to forget that an actor is playing it. Not so with this person.

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    1. I agree. And this actor generally played the same type of character in every movie. So, if you’ve seen one of this actor’s movies, you’ve pretty much seen ‘em all

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  26. What's the difference between John James Audubon and William Archibald Spooner?

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    Replies
    1. One watched his birds and the other botched his words.

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  27. Replies
    1. I think that the guys who write those probably have had their brains stuck in Spooner mode and can't get out.
      A caution: Reading them might have the same result.

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  28. Replies
    1. But is it the Chevalier Audubon? Full set of course.

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    2. Probably not, but I do have the later version of Ben Hur, by Lew Wallace.

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    3. Lew Wallace-anotherfamous Hoosier.

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  29. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    1. Some time ago, I started to always visit the new page as soon as it’s up and check “Notify me”, so as to always get every post, including any potential spoilers, emailed to me before Blaine can delete them.
      Not knowing that he deleted this comment, when I read this post of yours, I believe I thought, “Could he mean ...? No, that actor’s first and last names start with different letters!

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  30. If my answer is correct, this famous actor had the same physical disability as the current Roman Pontiff. In his later years, anyway.

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  31. This is NOT a good puzzle. Why not? Because there is an extra step involved by transforming the male name from its phonetic spelling to its orthographic spelling. This extra step causes doubt as to its correctness. There is no "Eureka!" moment. I think Eco-Archie found this one in the floorboards.

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    1. You obviously have no understanding of what a Spoonerism is. The puzzle works perfectly.

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    2. Thanks Wordsmythe. I too must obviously have no understanding of what a Spoonerism is, as this is the first puzzle this year that has me stumped. Freed from the belief that the actor's first and last name must start with the same letter (as the resulting "Spoonerized" names must) still has me coming up empty.

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    3. @HR You know what they say about assumptions...

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    4. Here is a favorite " the Lord is shoving leopard."

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    5. I read a book once by Mormon Nailer.

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    6. One of my favorites is Light Rain/Right Lane....

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    7. A toast to the queer old dean!

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    8. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    9. "There is more than one way to spell any damn word"
      Andrew Jackson

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    10. SARAH PALIN=PARASAILIN'
      FALLOUT SHELTER=SHELLOUT FALTER
      BLOOD AND THUNDER=THUD AND BLUNDER
      MUD FLAPS=FLOOD MAPS(actual previous Sunday Puzzle answer; Still don't have this week's, though!)

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    11. CRUSHING BLOW=BLUSHING CROW
      SONS OF TOIL=TONS OF SOIL

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    12. @B After exhausting Alan Arkin to Rene Russo, all assumptions got thrown out the window. Funny how with time when you leave the window open the solution comes flying in (and smacks you in the face).

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    13. Although probably most known for acting in westerns, JOHN WAYNE portrayed a military pilot in several films. And then there's the somewhat famous scene in "The Quiet Man" where Maureen O'Hara tries to slap the Duke in the face and ends up breaking her hand.

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  32. I saw this person on a program on one of the nostalgia channels recently. Between the puzzle and that program, I ended up purchasing a Kindle book that has a connection to the actor.

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    1. Monday, on "Laugh-In" on Decades TV, John Wayne said "Sock it to me."

      Giving a clue elsewhere, I said "I prefer Jeff Bridges", meaning in the remake of "True Grit", as well as overall, as an actor and human being. Also, I got the Kindle version of "True Grit" and am enjoying it greatly.

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  33. A curious Spoonerism of that "famous actor" JOHN DOE, who becomes DON JO (Josephine).

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    1. John Doe, the musician, is also an actor (and my late beloved stepmother was named Jo, for Josephine).

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Doe_(musician)

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  34. Going back to the random selection of on-air players question - Was this on-air player a clue?

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  35. I have to admit that I went through the current person more than once before I caught the answer. Is Crant a girl's name? If so, Cary Grant could be an alternate answer.

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    1. Except Gary and Crant don't start with the same letter. Imagine an actor with the name "Pill Folla". The resulting spoonerism is Phil & Paula – same letter, different pronunciations.

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    2. During the Civil War between the states there was a famous general's horse that would carry Grant.

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    3. I don't think Cincinnati was as famous as Traveller.

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    4. I would agree, but I also believe Cincinnati was the superior horse and Grant the superior equestrian.

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    5. My expertise in horses and brass is mostly limited to the ones that go round and round, and the ones formed into rings.

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    6. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    7. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    8. There's a connection to the puzzle in that clip, you know.

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    9. Wayne was offered the Slim Pickens role but turned it down.

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    10. According to Wikipedia, it was the Gene Wilder role that Wayne was offered. I hadn't known that. Anyway, I was surprised to find our posts deleted. Was it just the Western themes?

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    11. jan,
      Yes you are right about that. I was confusing it with Dr. StrangeGlove (sic) where he was offered the Slim Pickens role. Thankfully Pickens got that wonderful role and rode it for all it was worth.

      Yeah I only discovered our posts were removed after reading your 05:34 post. They shouldn't lead anyone to the answer.

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    12. Did you know Slim Pickens was a pilot, and I believe he owned a twin Beach?

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    13. That's "Beech", bitch. Speaking of On The Beach and Dr. Strangelove, happy Stanislav Petrov Day!

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    14. No! I wuz talking about his cabin by the lakes. On the bitch was my favorite 1959 movie. Much better than Been Her of that year. I loved the book too. I don't understand why it was B&W though. I wish Ted Talker would colorize it. And a very happy Stanislav Petrov Day to you 2.

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    15. He didn't get his own day, but we all owe a debt of gratitude to Vasili Arkhipov.

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    16. True, though there's really no comparison between the nuclear arsenals of 1983 and those of two decades earlier.

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    17. According to one estimate (I’ve provided the link below), had the 1962 crisis escalated into nuclear war, the total number of deaths world-wide would have been between 300 million and 500 million (about 10% to 16% of the global population at the time). The U. S. A. would have lost an estimated 30 million (about 16% of the nation’s population in 1962). And while it is certainly true that nuclear arsenals had increased considerably by 1983, if the unthinkable had occurred in 1962, the world would have been a very different place twenty years later.

      https://www.quora.com/What-would-have-happened-if-the-Cuban-missile-crisis-had-escalated-into-a-world-war

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    18. I think we can agree that it's good World War III didn't happen yet.

      I'm surprised that speculation about what Trump might do if he loses on 11/3 hasn't (so far) included a wag-the-dog war scenario. Maybe an update to the The 2020 Commission Report on the North Korean Nuclear Attacks Against the United States is in order?

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    19. I think it will be good to read Daniel Ellsburg's latest book that came out 2 1/2 years ago:

      The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner
      Book by Daniel Ellsberg

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    20. Agreed. And it’s why someone with his temperament should not be in charge of nuclear weapons.

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    21. That is not what the book is about. It is about the need for the world to destroy all the nukes because it is not about any one person or country. The book tells about the things we, the public, do not know, and that even includes Congress.

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    22. Miscommunication on my part. I was replying to jan and didn’t see your post until after I had submitted mine. That said, Ellsberg has to my mind always been on the right side of history.

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    23. I sometimes am unsure just who someone is posting to here.

      This new book is far more frightening than the Pentagon Papers. And Nixon too.

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    24. We discussed Ellsberg's book last Stanislav Petrov Day, when I was reading it (and also gave a shoutout to Vasily Arkhipov), and the following week, when skydiveboy checked it out.

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    25. I knew I had post here about it before, but forgot all those details. Just hope I don't forget to hook up your static line.

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    26. Speaking of which, do skydiving schools still use static lines, or are they all doing tandem jumps these days?

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    27. jan,
      That is a very good question. I they are in some places. They shouldn't be teaching that way now that Tandem is available everywhere. Static line is the way I learned and I hated it. I made the minimum 5 SL jumps and swore I would never do another and I have kept that promise. It is a backward way of learning, but it used to be the only realistic way to learn.

      You get good at skydiving by skydiving. SL is not skydiving because there is no freefall. You get comfortable by experiencing freefall. In SL training you go at it backwards beginning with what is called a clear and pull, or 3 second FF. Rarely does it take the student a full 3 seconds the first time to pull the ripcord, which is the end of FF. The progression goes from 3 seconds to 5 seconds to 10 seconds to 15 seconds. Usually more than one at each level depending on performance. None of that is long enough to become comfortable during FF, at least for most people. With Tandem you begin with long FF on the first skydive. Need I say more?

      Blaine and his family know this even though they never jumped. If you recall they came up my way on a vacation a few years back and did a wind machine simulation south of Seattle. He filmed them doing it, so you can probably look for it on his family blog. Because of this they learned right away that it takes time in the FF to get comfortable with it.

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  36. Ok, I’ll play. Does Katherine Hepbone’s cheekburns count?

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  37. Has anyone besides me noticed that when you submit the answer, then in the email response after requoting your submission, it then says “Name:” and “Phone:”. Well, your phone number is given OK, albeit without any hyphens, but only your FIRST NAME is given! When this happened last week, I thought that my last name had gotten lost from the form. This time, before hitting the “submit” button, I first scrolled back to make sure that my last name was still on that form!

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    1. I looked and my phone number has its hyphens. Maybe someone broke your hyphen.

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    2. SDB,
      You would put a cherry on top!

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    3. He was probably just dehyphenated.

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    4. You take the hyphen; I'll take the loafin'.

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    5. If you ever get to the Oregon Coast, maybe we can have a cup of coffee together.

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    6. Do we have to share? Can't we both have a cup?

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    7. Man, I really have to watch out for your wit and sense of humor. OK, you win.

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  38. I finally got it on day six...although I worked this name on Sunday at least three times...I kept pronouncing the boy’s name in the German way.

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    1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  39. Alan Alda spoonerizes to.... Never mind.

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  40. Paul Bates is an actor. Spoonerize his name and you get Ball Pates which is very close to bald pates.

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  41. John Wayne >>> Juan & Jane

    My Hint:

    “I am thinking of a mid career movie this actor headlined. The first word in the title is a pronoun and the last two words are an object. If you change the pronoun to its opposite the title now describes how I think about this actor.”

    The movie is: “She Wore A Yellow Ribbon.” I think John Wayne should have worn a yellow ribbon to indicate what a coward he was. All during WWII actor friends of his that had joined up to fight tried to get Wayne to join too, but he refused. That I can respect, but he spent the rest of his life portraying himself, both on film and off, as being a hero and was a right wing warmonger who tirelessly supported our wars and encouraged young men and boys to join up and fight and die in these wars. What a hypocrite! Or as the Harvard Lampoon called him: the “biggest fraud in history.”

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    1. I had solved John Wayne: Juan/Jayne, but I could not figure out your clue! For some reason I thought you meant there were only 3 words in the title: pronoun, object, object. So the only movie I thought you meant was "His Private Secretary" and I couldn't make that work. Now I understand! Also, totally agree w/ your opinion on John Wayne...

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    2. Second biggest fraud in history!

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  42. JOHN WAYNE —> JUAN, JANE

    My clue: “Mmm...a tasty puzzle. Nicely done, Eco.”

    "Marion Michael Morrison"--MMM--was for many years wrongly listed as Wayne's birth name. (The name had mistakenly been advanced by studio publicists; Wayne's birth name was actually Marion Robert Morrison.) In addition, there is on the web a short comic film called “John Wayne Tasty Strikes Again.” (Who knew?) And, finally, there are also available on the web seven casserole recipes, presumably "tasty," named after the man nicknamed "Duke."

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  43. JOHN WAYNE. “Interchange the initial CONSONANT sounds” (J & W), not the initial syllable sounds. → JUAN JANE.

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  44. JOHN WAYNE -> JUAN, JANE

    > At first, I thought I had something in common with this person, but not at first.

    Initially, we're both "JW". But Marion Michael Morrison wasn't JOHN WAYNE, initially.

    > How many ways to clue the movie for which the actor won an Oscar? It would take twenty minutes, I'd guess.

    Hominy ways to clue "True Grit(s)"? Ask my cousin Vinny.

    > There's an interesting (I think) irony involving a movie the actor produced, directed, and starred in, and the location of something named for the actor.

    JOHN WAYNE played Davy Crockett in The Alamo (1960). Crockett, and most of the other defenders of the Alamo, were killed by the forces of Mexican General Antonio López de Santa Anna. John Wayne Airport (SNA) is in Santa Ana, CA.

    In February, on my last trip before the COVID lockdown, we visited Austin, TX, and took a side trip to San Antonio, where we toured the Alamo. Totally skippable.

    (BTW, 67A in Tuesday's NYT crossword is "ALAMO".)

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    Replies
    1. Santa Ana is a sizable city, but not big enough to include Orange County Airport, the name I refuse to change in my mind, only partly because it is in my Logbook.

      The comment stream this week approaches a record for weirdness.

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    2. Was it SNA back then, too? Never mind changed names, my log book includes several airports that no longer exist, including Zahn's and Deer Park, on Long Island, and Somerset Hills, in NJ.

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  45. I wrote, “Take the person’s full given name. Remove all letters that repeat. Rearrange. You get a kitchen gadget.” MARION ROBERT MORRISON reduces and rearranges to BASTER.

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    1. Rob, there are 4 R's in that name.

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    2. Oh, rats, you are right. I messed up the count!

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    3. I could not get baster to work.

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    4. Well, if your baster doesn't work, you're gonna have a mighty dry turkey, Pilgrim.

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    5. Didn't John Wayne star in a movie, "The High and the Mighty?" I suppose it too was a turkey.

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    6. What did you think about John Wayne as Genghis Khan in "The Conquerer"?

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    7. I do not recall having watched it. I may have though and forgotten, but I don't think so. I was eleven back then. I did see many of his pictures growing up and enjoyed most of them. If I try and watch one now I tend to gag. Hatari was one of my favorites when it came out. I recently watched it again and saw it from a very different point of view and was not impressed.

      John Wayne just played the same role over and over again, but in a manner that charmed us back then. I think he was also a very personable guy it would be hard not to enjoy having a drink with, but when you come to learn more about who he really was it sours your scotch.

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    8. Blaine,
      You now have me wondering why you mentioned that particular movie, Genghis Khan, in your post above. I doubt it had to do with Howard Hughes, but perhaps the "fallout" both during and after it was made. I will admit the pun is intended, but the question is sincere. Also, what is your take on the movie?

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  46. Unknown’s hint about disability actually led me to the answer this week

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  47. On Sunday morning I complimented Snipper for commenting that NPR on-air contestant Danette Pachtner provided a clue to "John Wayne," the answer to this week's puzzle created by Greg VanMechelen (ecoarchitect). Danette Pachtner is employed by Duke University. John Wayne was known as "Duke."
    In my sign-off I noted that I was "WritingFromTheHomeStateOfBabeTheBlueOx." Babe was Paul Bunyan's pet/companion. John Bunyan wrote "the Pilgrim's Progress" in 1678. John Wayne, in a movie or two, including "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence," referred to tenderfoot-Easterners as "Pilgrims."
    As for tomorrow's Puzzleria!...
    "Put up your Duke, Pilgrim!" is the title of our eight riff-offs of Greg VanMechelen's NPR puzzle.
    Tomorrow's Puzzleria! also features a challenging and creative five-part mathematical puzzle created by multitalented Mathew Huffman.
    Other puzzles on out menu are titled:
    "An ounce of prevention,"
    "Sharp as an ax... or as an ox?"
    and, to top it all off,
    a "Skyhook Dessert."
    Enjoy.

    LegoWhoBelievesBeingCalledA"Pilgrim"ByTomDoniphonWasA"GrimPill"forRansom"Ranse"StoddardToSwallow!

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    1. Thanks Lego - yes, that was my clue.

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    2. Also, the first syllable in Danette's surname sounds like something the actor wore in True Grit.

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    3. You are welcome, Snipper.
      Great "True Grit" connection, Paul.

      LegoWhoOnPirateDayMayWearAnEyepatchAarrgh!

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  48. John Wayne>>>>>Juan, Jayne (or Jane!).

    As Margaret pointed out, John Wayne (born Marion Morrison) and Michael Caine (born Maurice Micklewhite) had the same initials before they adopted their stage names – hence my comment that I had the same initial reaction.

    My complimenting Eco, and saying, “Bravo,” was a pointer to John Wayne’s 1959 movie, Rio Bravo.

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    Replies
    1. Ditto. My quip about a popular Chinese soup- was expunged. Won Ton.

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  49. What is Blaine’s clue? The W in women?

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    1. I though he was referring to the ambiguity of "Marion". But I also wonder whether the Post-It note graphic referred to 3M?

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  50. JOHN WAYNE >>> JUAN, JAYNE

    "DEFinitely. . ." = Juan DE Fuca Tectonic Plate

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  51. John Wayne, Wohn (Juan), Jayne (Jane)

    Last Sunday I said, “The actor’s name reminds me of a 1966 James Brown hit. A last name associated with one of the spoonerized first names reminds me of the – then – social order.” The hit song is “It’s a Man’s, Man’s, Man’s World” as John Wayne plays so many manly men. The spoonerized first name is Jayne, as in Jayne field, emphasis added.

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    1. The above should have displayed Jayne Mansfield. I had "<" and ">" around "Mans." I guess Blaine's editor takes that to mean "Do not print."

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    2. You can use certain HTML tags within Blogger comments to format things like bold or italic text. Do a search for Blogger HTML comments for more details.

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  52. I submitted John Wayne, Juan, Jane, but never got around to offering a clue this week. Too busy.

    (Which I guess makes me the strong, silent type, which is indeed my John Wayne clue?)

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  53. The clue I came up with - GABRIELA SABATINI

    The former Argentine tennis player was compared to John Wayne for her broad shouldered gait on the court. Thought someone would call TMI on it.

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    1. If Will ever asks us to find an athlete who anagrams to INSATIABLE AIRBAG, I'm ready.

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    2. On a related note, she actually once dated Donald Trump.

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  54. I continue to disagree with every pronunciation-based puzzle I have seen since I started on the puzzles two years ago.

    I'm starting to think I might be the problem.

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  55. My friend's grandmother was hit on by a very drunk John Wayne even though her new groom was just in the bathroom and she told him so. He started to put his hands on her and she pushed the drunkard off the bar stool. His "charm" went away after that.

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    1. Based on what I’ve read, John Wayne needed to shoot his movie scenes in the morning, because he started drinking around noon, and was a mean drunk

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