Sunday, March 28, 2021

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Mar 28, 2021): One For the Birds

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Mar 28, 2021): One For the Birds
Q: Name something birds do. Put the last sound of this word at the start and the first sound at the end, and phonetically you'll name something else birds do. What are these things?
I almost posted a picture of a bird doing both things.

Edit: The first picture I picked had an open-beaked bird on a branch.
A: CHIRP⟷PERCH

220 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. Just got it. Now for a clue...

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  3. An obscure musical clue: Lucille.

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  4. Change one letter in one word and you get an animal; change one letter in the other word and get a fruit.

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  5. Cute puzzle. Appropriate while I sit at my window, watching the rain, with a cat on my lap.

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  6. 500 answers last week. This week 2,500+? Nice to have an instant answer and free day.

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  7. Is ngatfishick a thing?

    https://twitter.com/BirdsRon/status/1375636732167786496?s=19

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  8. No need for hints this week, so I'll just make the observation that today's on-air puzzle was much harder to craft than to solve. It's not easy to find antonyms that also have homophones. Anybody have some others?

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    1. Here's one: I heard the neigh of a horse.

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    2. Open your eyes, it's as plain as the nose on your face.

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  9. An easier one this week. Might not get 300+ comments.

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  10. I think there is some poetic license as far as switching the sounds. Let this be a tribute to the late Mark Fidrych - the Bird - on the week of Opening Day. And he did both things.

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    1. Thank you Leo for prompting me to read about Mark Fidrych. He was a rare bird.

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    2. Coincidentally and serendipitously, Mark Fidrych is mentioned on the current Puzzleria!. There is even an image of him (his Sports Illustated cover).
      Congratulations, incidently, to ecoarchitect for giving us a clever and elegant gem of a puzzle this week. He draws them up very well.

      LegoWhoObservesThatWhileClintTalkedToTheTreesMarkTalkedToTheBaseball!

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    3. Kudos to Eco. I always like these nature puzzles as i was biology major at Western close to where Enya used to abide.

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    4. Leo , I agree with the mentnon of poetic license. I took me an hour and a half and I'm supposed to be a birder.

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    5. Plantsmith, like I replied in last week's thread, waddya mean, used to abide?

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    6. You really expect me to dig through 335 comments?
      OMG

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  11. Take the two words that are the answers. Swap the initial sounds of both words and, phonetically you will name a type of building and a ne're-do-well.

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    1. Round 'n round we go. Would have been a more interesting puzzle if it worked backwards from your puzzle to the birds.

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    2. Those are kinda mutually exclusive. Or at least they should be.

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    3. Chirp & Perch --> Church & Perp.

      ...and yes you could have swapped the last sounds.

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  12. Comments/Correct Answers for last week was about. 5

    This week I'll guess more like 0.01

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  13. Whew! Thank god it won’t be one of those weeks where I’m pulling my hair out until Thursday. Now excuse me while I rlutterf away.

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  14. This week’s puzzle is alarmingly simple. I got the answer well before Will finished the clue. Now I am going fishing.

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  15. Take one of the words. Change its last letter to the immediately preceding one. Its two syllables will sound phonetically like two answers to last week's puzzle, or alternately like a national capital of a country currently in the news.

    The other word was hinted at by Encyclopsedia above.

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    Replies
    1. Any more hints, and you'll have to cross them out, bro.

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    2. I think Encyclopspedia hinted at both.

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    3. Wolfgang - agree. But the first one involves americium, which brings us back to fission.

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    4. Geo: Confirms my submission. Great. Clever.

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    5. I misread instructions and wasted a lot of time solving. No wonder everyone said easy puzzle.

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  16. There are many common types of birds that do neither of these things.

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    1. Agree. Or if they tried to do so [requiring human assistance], it might be like the end of a nursery rhyme.

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  17. My GF and I solved this in about 10 seconds over sausage and eggs at breakfast this morning. We’re planning on fish for dinner tonight but probably won’t be solving another puzzle.

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  18. Be careful not to cross the line with your clues.

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  19. Alternate answer: MATE and TAME ?

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    Replies
    1. Except when do you ever see a bird taming some other creature?

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  20. This one was easy. I can kick back now and wait for Lulu and WS to call me.

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    1. How did you get away with that post?
      pjbRemindedOfANoveltySongAboutSssshhhhavingCream

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  23. Well, it ain't Greek to me this week. Not a clue, just a fact. Back to sleep for me.

    Chag Sameach....my wife and I had a great seder last night. In these pandemic times, it was just the two of us.

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  24. Replies
    1. Could an EMU EMUlate these behaviors?

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    2. Good question, Jan. I think yes, although it may take him awhile.

      LegoWhoBelievesTheEmuIsNotAnEarlyBird

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  25. I am an avid birder and I couldn't get this. I asked my daughter to name something birds do and one of these words was her first response. A beginner's mind often brings clarity.

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    1. It just struck me that an avid birder backwards is a red rib diva.

      Please do not take this personally: it is just an observation.

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    2. I love to use the adjective avid to describe a birder. Gives me a smile. No worries about me taking that personally. My diva days are in the past. :-)

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    3. My mother had a fear of birds [ornithophobia? - in Wikipedia but not in M-W] but my woman friend in Ivančice, Czechia likes birds.

      M-W does say, though, that you are an ornithoscopist.

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    4. Similar story: when I was ten or so I watched Citizen Kane on tv with my two older sisters. After the scene with the newsreel makers I piped up with "It's his sled." (Apologies to anyone who hasn't seen the movie, but that's not much of a spoiler in any case.) I don't think I would have made the connection if I had seen it for the first time when I was a sixteen-year-old, but it made perfect sense to my ten-year-old mind.

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    5. Too early for "Ornithology"? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQ0Ja1219WQ.

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    6. Very Buddhist and something to be cherished. The beginners mind.Thic Nhat Hahn talks a lot about it.

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    7. One easy to miss hint: "piped up" as a synonym for "chirped."

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  26. Blaine, do you know how a hummingbird calls its mother?
    H'mmmmmmmmmmmother!

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    1. And all along, I thought they only hummed because they didn't know the words!

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  27. Well done ECO. Not that hard, but a clever puzzle.

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  29. Cute, eco. Very cute. Still miss you around these parts.

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    1. Matala: Circling back to your comment on my clues last week, Matala is the arguably the southernmost point (Key West?)in Europe, at the southern tip of Crete. In fall 1975 I was working and traveling in Europe and drifted south where the weather suited my clothes and the prices suited my budget, which was $1/day. There was a large community of perhaps a couple of hundred "hippie" people living in these Neolithic caves. Americans were a small minority and living was easy.

      Joni Mitchell apparently spent time there in 68/69, and it is the setting for her song "Carey". "The wind is in from Africa...". There was only one cafe, so I think I could find the Mermaid Cafe if I went back. We called the owner Mama.

      One day the beach was buzzed by fighter jets and soldiers in trench coats with machine guns came and peacefully evicted everyone from the caves. I remained for a while and camped on the beach which was OK.

      Apparently they have a beach festival every June and this has sparked an interest in returning.

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    2. DDX, thanks. I did a bit of duckduckgoing to discern some of this about the Matala caves, especially the Joni Mitchell part. Great to read your narrative and glad you experienced Crete cave life!

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    3. I agree w Word Woman. We miss you Eco.

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    4. WW Are you familiar with the "bang" commands in duckduckgo? There are thousands, but if you type !g in DDG, you will get an anonymous Google search. For more info, see: https://duckduckgo.com/bang_lite.html

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    5. DDX, thanks for the ! suggestions. I look forward to trying them out. I do enjoy duckduckgo a great deal.

      We used to have a restaurant here called Bang! which I always thought of as !! (!). This is the only time you'll see three exclamation points in a row from me :-).

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  30. Do puzzle creators get a Weekend Edition lapel pin? Eco? If not, I think you should.

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  31. Need something else to do the rest of the week. How about anagramming famous people's names into meaningful phrases, e.g.: Fats Waller to water falls, Carlo Ponti to paint color. Try these: Fidel Castro, Oscar Schindler, Steve Carell, Gary Coleman. Find more such.

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    1. Or I have been waiting to try this bit I coined some time back:

      You may recall Henry Fonda and his acting family. The question is, is Jane Fonda Peter?

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    2. Some actual anagrams from celebrity names:
      MEG RYAN=GERMANY
      BRITNEY SPEARS=PRESBYTERIANS
      ERIC CLAPTON=NARCOLEPTIC
      AXL ROSE=ORAL SEX
      SPIRO AGNEW=GROW A SPINE(Dick Cavett discovered an even worse alternative to that one, but you've probably already figured it out by now!)
      MAYA RUDOLPH=PROUDLY A HAM(no critique on her SNL hosting gig last week, just a coincidence)
      AMY POEHLER=MY REAL HOPE(Quite a few others are possible)
      GORE VIDAL=I LOVE DRAG(Same here, according to Mr. Cavett)
      ALEC GUINNESS=GENUINE CLASS
      PIERS MORGAN=A GRIM PERSON
      GILDA RADNER=DARLING DEAR
      PETER FONDA=PEE, NOD, FART(Sorry, SDB, I just had to find one in that name, out of curiosity!)
      pjbCanBeRearrangedToMakeAPBandJ!

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    3. STEVE CARELL=LEAST CLEVER(again, no critique)
      MILEY CYRUS=YES, I'M CURLY
      BUSTER KEATON=BROKEN STATUE
      ALICE COOPER=A COOL RECIPE(actually used by our colleague Legolambda on Puzzleria!)
      FIDEL CASTRO=ACTOR'S FIELD
      KATIE COURIC=A CUTIE, I ROCK
      SARAH PALIN=A SHARP NAIL
      JOE BIDEN=I NEED JOB
      MEREDITH VIEIRA=TIME I ARRIVED, EH?
      GEORGE HARRISON=SEE AGING HORROR
      MICHAEL JACKSON=CANCEL HIS JAM, OK?
      KATHIE LEE GIFFORD=THE GLORIFIED FAKE
      HOWARD STERN=TRASH WONDER
      ROBERT DOLE=ELDER ROBOT
      PRINCESS DIANA=SNAP! DIES IN CAR!
      (Those last four I actually found in Mad Magazine a few years ago. I agree with you, that last one is in very poor taste.)
      GEORGE BUSH=HE BUGS GORE(Remember the 2000 election?)
      OSCAR SCHINDLER=SOLDIER'S CHANCE
      GARY COLEMAN=A CORNY GLEAM
      TRACY MORGAN=MARTYR CAN GO
      pjbSaysThisMartyrCanGoRightNow!

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    4. I feel I must respond to your first set. You list Gore Vidal and Alec Guinness together. Both were gay, but I doubt Vidal would have ever dressed in drag. As for Guinness, he came across as the epitome of class, but I was disturbed to discover that in fact he was not that at all. He and his wife would entertain in their home in the most pecuniary and disgusting manner one can imagine, and that is only if one has a very keen imagination. I still believe him to be one of the finest actors of all time, and if you have not yet watched, Tunes of Glory, then why are you still sitting there?

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    5. Not every anagram has to perfectly describe the celebrity, SDB. Lighten up.
      One more(I can't believe I forgot this one):
      CLINT EASTWOOD=OLD WEST ACTION
      pjbSaysTheIdeaOfAnAnagramIsToRearrangeTheLetters,NotNecessarilyChangeOne'sOpinionOfTheOriginalSubjectMatter

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    6. Take it up with Dick Cavett. Surely you didn't miss where I'd credited him for the Vidal one.
      pjbSaysWTFIsWrongWithSDB?

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    7. PJB,
      Get over yourself. I was simply passing on interesting information.

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    8. sdb: You are 0 for 3 or 4 in as many weeks in replying to my comments and questions to you.
      When I posted "Pecuniary?" I was asking in what way was Alec's imaginary and disgusting behavior pecuniary.
      Until you enlighten us, I will guess that he had Olivier, Gielgud and others over and forced them to play strip Monopoly.

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    9. SDB--heartily agree when it comes to "Tunes of Glory." And the Ealing comedies too.

      I saw that Fonda Peters joke in Playboy in the 1960s--when they still sold that magazine in drug stores and didn't prevent pimply teenagers from loitering there. Yes, I read them for the articles, particularly "the."

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    10. Italo Svevo:

      Yes, I agree, those are priceless. Alex Guinness said "Tunes of Glory" was his favorite.

      I coined the Fonda joke recently, but wondered if it had been thought of before. With most jokes I make up I would not be surprised, but there are some I know I am the only one.

      Last Saturday I coined one while walking in the cemetery that is just one block from my house. I wanted to make it easy for my family. Yesterday I got to try it out on some of the cemetery workers who laughed and said they hadn't heard that one before. I am fairly certain it is an original, but you can't know for sure. The joke is asking if the worker(s) are aware of how much they have in common with the fence that borders the cemetery. The answer is that they are both barriers.

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  32. Is there a missing instruction in the wording of the puzzle? The letters in the words that I have found need to be slightly adjusted to sound right.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. Remember it says to switch the sounds (not necessarily the same as switching the letters). It also says "phonetically you'll name…."

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    3. I guess I was over thinking things. Thanks!

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  33. Replies
    1. Excellent! Probably a candidate for disqualification on two counts (so should survive here), but at least it applies to all birds.

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    2. Agreed, Lancek. If only that pesky word "else" ("something else birds do" ...or rather doo-doo?) were not in the text of eco's puzzle!

      LegoWhoSaysItIsGreatToHavezekecreekBackOnBlaine'sBlog(AndThatIsNoBS(BirdS***!)

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  35. It is nice to see eco here again, even if there is something awry with this challenge.
    I got an (the?) answer instantaneously and wondered "what?"
    and still do.
    A saving grace may be that I have a second answer and, to save the week, hope to find more.

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  36. Thanks for the correction. I may not have gotten the answer without that wisdom. ;)

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  37. Interestingly there is another bird word that phonetically describes the worth of this puzzle.

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    Replies
    1. Congratulation ECO. Two in one month??

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    2. ECO: WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN? missing you. Be safe. Glad i solved your puzzle. Did you get a pin?

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    3. You'll be happy to know I started with cloacal kiss.

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    4. Where on earth did you end up?!
      pjbWondersIfACloacalKissRequiresMakeupJustLikeTheRockGroupKiss?

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  38. An easy but fun puzzle this week!

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    1. My child and I once had a dove; he would coo, but did not ook.

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  39. Remove a letter from one of the words, and you will get something that I ate today.

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    1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    2. And that comment just gave me the answer. Thanks, Wolfgang! Good thing this week's challenge is nothing like last week's! Good one, eco!
      pjbStillThinksEdPegg,Jr.'sPuzzleIsForTheBirds!

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    3. I, for one, want to speak up in defense of Ed Pegg's clever puzzle. I thoroughly enjoyed it, though I did not solve it.
      All in all, Ed's puzzle was a dern sight better than many of the sitcom-laced, showbiz-spiked boat anchors that appear on this and other puzzle sites (and as crossword clues).

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    4. Well i guess he has got you Pegged..

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    5. Change one letter in one of the words to get something else you may have eaten today. No, it is not leather.

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  40. At the moment, my attention is more directed to Bluejays and Bulldogs.

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  41. As I was just now finishing my breakfast I suddenly had the earth shaking realization that a chicken rancher and an Hawaiian tourist both have the same thing in common, not to mention a teenager on his prom.

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  42. EVER GIVEN anagrams to NEVER GIVE.

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  43. Change 2 letters in one word and you get the name of a country, change 2 letters in another and you get the name of a US politician. Actually, there are 2 ways to do these both!

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  44. Remove duplicate letters and rearrange the rest to get something cryptic.

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  45. If flying squirrels were birds they’d both store and roast

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  46. Well, for those of us who've solved it,...

    I find it interesting that if you look up one of the words in
    Wiktionary,
    you have to scroll way down past Etymology 1 to Etymology 2, where that word is the first (of 8) meanings as a noun, as well as the first (of 5) meanings as a verb.

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  47. Yes, it was a strong effort by Mr. Pegg. I enjoyed it as well.

    And yes, there's a solidly tmi clue hanging out above.

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  48. Wow! Easy compared to last week. Got it in about a minute! Not sure on a clue yet

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  49. Wow! Easy compared to last week. Got it in about a minute! Not sure on a clue yet

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  50. Wow! Easy compared to last week. Got it in about a minute! Not sure on a clue yet

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  51. I have a backwards tape recorder I use to practice backwards speech ala Michael J. Anderson in Twin Peaks. I put both of these words into by backwards machine and they come out nothing like the other. I understand that this is not the intension of this weeks puzzle, but I do feel there is a missing instruction to the puzzle.

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    Replies
    1. I originally equated "sound" with syllable. Once I got past that the answer appeared.

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    2. WW: I also equated sound with syllable. Took me awhile to read the puzzle more carefully and arrive at the correct interpretation.

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    3. By the puzzle instructions, TENNIS would convert to SENATE, but it seems like a backwards tape recorder would convert it to SINNETTE.

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  53. This could be a Goldsboro but there is a fly fishing term where you try to imitate what is on the insect on water, -----ing the _____?

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  54. Take one of the words, and add a word for a baby bird. Combine them into a portmanteau, and you'll name a love interest from a famous musical, the title of which names a location where birds are often found.

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    1. Another love interest (?) from the musical has the name of an animal and a space weapon (?).

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  55. My child and I once had a dove; he would coo, but did not ook.

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  56. Just thought I would barge in here to say Stucky McStuck Boat is unstuck.

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    1. That's a(n) (Ever) Given.

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    2. Egypt managed to keep the crisis well contained.

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    3. ... which may appear on Will's end-of-year list of new names in the news.

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  57. A second billionaire has now been seriously killed in helicopter accidents.

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    1. He was just another run of the mill, foreign billionaire.

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    2. Czech, mate. I assume you mean Petr Kellner, who was heli-skiing in Alaska. But, who was the first dead billionaire you referenced?

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    3. Like I posted above. I don't remember his name and had never heard of him. They never invite me to any of their parties.

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    4. Jan - Who was the first. What was the second.

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    5. And the third will be…I don't know.

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    6. Olivier Dassault--if you can believe the New York Post.
      https://nypost.com/2021/03/08/french-billionaire-olivier-dassault-dies-in-helicopter-crash/. Scion of a French airplane manufacturing enterprise whose name rhymes, sort of, with the word for "jump" in French. (Please pardon my ghoulishness>)

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    7. You can't always believe the New York Post, but this story is no mirage.

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    8. Yes, Jim, seriously killed. I love black humor. I hope you do too.

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  59. Going from last weeks to this weeks is as jarring as the Jeopardy to Wheel of Fortune transition

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  60. Citizens we must for our sake get a firm grip on reality. The Corona Virus we call Covid 19 did not come from a Wuhan laboratory, nor did it come from exotic game markets in China. If you care to recall you may remember that during the mid nineteen sixties Volkswagen in Germany came out with the VW Variant. I know, we all, myself included, believed this to be a somewhat revolutionary passenger vehicle going beyond the typical VW Beetle, but where is your critical thinking? Come on; just how obvious could it be that this is a retroactive attack on our society by Der Fuhrer, Adolph Hitler himself. I rest my case.

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    1. SDB, Just how many times did you hang upside down from that plane wing?

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    2. Cap,
      Well if you actually read my above post you might think it was too many. LOL

      Your rhetorical question has me wondering myself now. I don't know how many times, but it was other planes too. I think I noted it in my many log books each time I did it. It would take me hours to look through all that to find out and it ain't gonna happen.

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    3. It was in response to that post. Although it sounds like fun, I wonder just how terrified I'd be.

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    4. Well you would not be able to do the foot hang, but you certainly can go experience a Tandem skydive with a personal instructor. I cannot tell you how you will feel before you exit the plane, but all fear goes away right after you exit. There is no falling sensation either. It is exhilarating. Now is the time. Winter is over.

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    5. At the drop zone I used to go to there was a guy who used to invert during his canopy descent, hooking his feet around the risers. It always looked like he was bound to break his neck but seemingly at the last second before landing he'd always flip back over and land standing up ("always," as far as I know ...)

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    6. Inverting under canopy is easy to do and not particularly dangerous. How many jumps do you have?

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  61. Perhaps the purple martin, with its feathery sheen, does these things too. Geofan- I liked your clue way above, which has another connection to last week’s puzzle.

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  62. @Snipper--I think it's a parrot (or was).

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    1. A reference to Monty Python's dead parrot sketch, where the purchaser of a parrot comes back to complain when he discovered that the parrot is not only dead ("joined the bleedin' choir invisible," etc.) but had been nailed to its perch.

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  63. CHIRP & PERCH

    My HInt:
    "Interestingly there is another bird word that phonetically describes the worth of this puzzle."
    CHEEP > CHEAP

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  64. CHIRP + PERCH

    My “obscure musical clue: Lucille”—No, not the obvious—not the Kenny Rogers’ song or Little Richard’s or even B. B. King’s guitar or song (there are some other possibilities as well) but a reference to Lucille Bogan, an early blues singer, who in 1923 sang “Chirpin’ the Blues.”

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  65. PERCH, CHIRP

    > Spoonerize to get two more words.

    Perp, church

    > To sleep.... [Deleted, though when I Google that, I only get links to insomnia cures]

    PERCHance to dream.

    > Another love interest (?) from the musical has the name of an animal and a space weapon (?).

    Marjorie Taylor Greene told me they had space lasers in the shtetl.

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    1. I'd wager that most NPR listeners are familiar with the soliloquy in Hamlet Act III, Scene I even without having to Google it. :)

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    2. PERCH, CHIRP

      jan, it was your "To sleep. . ." post that brought me to the answer.

      Forgot it was Thursday. No foolin'.

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    3. Years ago there was a notice at my doctor's clinic I would encounter each time I entered that informed us that TB testing was on Wednesdays... I sometimes would tell them that it remind me of Shakespeare.

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  66. PERCH, “last sound” CH, “first sound” P → CHERP, “phonetically” → CHIRP.

    Of course the reverse, CHIRPPERCH, works as well...

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  67. I wrote, “Change one letter in one word and you get an animal; change one letter in the other word and get a fruit.” That’s “chimp” and “peach.”

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  68. "Cryptic Crossword Casserole" is on this week's Puzzleria! menu!
    Our friend Patrick J. Berry (aka cranberry) has concocted this pièce de résistance of culinary cleverness. It is the 19th cryptic crossword puzzle of Patrick's that we have featured on P!
    Also on our menus this week:
    *A Schpuzzle of the Week in which Andy and Aunt Bee pay a visit to a poultry farm and pay up for produce,
    * A conundrum about "keeping cool in the heat of competition,"
    * Nine riff-off of Ecoarchitect's "Perchy-keen" NPR puzzle, and to top it all off,
    * a delightful Dessert puzzle about little Peggy, who is partial to purple and pink.
    Puzzleria! is uploaded each week very early on Friday, at Midnight PDT.
    Why not drop by for a Midnight Snack!

    LegoWhoEncouragesYouToSamplePatrick'sCrossword:"It'sCrypdelicious!"

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  69. Alt answer: mob, bom (as in after the car wash)

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  70. Chirp/Perch. I really enjoyed all the clever hints and clues above.

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  71. chirp, perch

    Last Sunday I said, “My GF and I solved this in about 10 seconds over sausage and eggs at breakfast this morning. We’re planning on fish for dinner tonight but probably won’t be solving another puzzle.” Fish --> perch.

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  72. Take one of the words. Change its last letter to the immediately preceding one. Its two syllables will sound phonetically like two answers to last week's puzzle, or alternately like a national capital of a country currently in the news ... the first one involves americium, which brings us back to fission.

    CHIRP => CHIRO soune like CHI RHO (Greek χ ρ) or CAIRO

    PERCH involves fishing which sounds like fission. Americium is a fissionable transuranic element. It is also an α-particle emitter (yet another connection with last week's puzzle!) that is used in ionization detectors in smoke detectors (the alarms hinted at by Wolfgang).

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    Replies
    1. Don't know whether the α-particle connection was the one that Snipper hinted at above.

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    2. Hey Geo - Clever clue of Chi Ro and Cairo. I was also thinking about the ship stuck in the Suez, which backwards spells Zeus, a Greek god.

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    3. I gave the bonus puzzle: "Name a world capital in two letters" back in January 24, the answer being CHI + RHO = Cairo.

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  73. CHIRP, PERCH
    Anyone here also going over to Puzzleria! should definitely check out my latest cryptic crossword. It's tricky, but hopefully not too tricky!
    pjbCanGiveAsGoodAsHeGets,Puzzle-Wise(MaybeEvenBetter)

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  74. I got the call and the answer to the next puzzle is: FOX News

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    Replies
    1. Good thing it's April 1, and the puzzle segment doesn't tape until Friday.

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    2. Anyway, we weren't talking about FOX News, we're talking about BIRD News.

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    3. Were they flying North to the Oscars?

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    4. Huh. Try this:

      https://youtu.be/lzhDsojoqk8

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    5. Speaking of FOX News, a.k.a. FAKE FLOCKING NEWS. Has anyone discovered from where the volcano this is molten from?

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  75. My clue: chirp -> change two letters -> Chile, China
    perch -> change two letters -> Pence, Perot

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  76. Crazy day. Broke my eyeglasses, grabbed my spares and went to get my glasses fixed. By the time I made it home....

    Anyway ... PERCH/CHIRP.... my posts about sitting with my cat were my being perched at my desk, with a cat perched on my lap....

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  77. Chirp-perch
    Lays- sail , involves only one bird gender as if we were allowed to speculate. Time to cancel myself out ;)

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  78. Sport clue: Cincinnati Reds—Johnny Bench
    Birds like to perch on benches.

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  79. Has anyone been reading Don Lemmon's new book? I'm about half way though.

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