Sunday, April 11, 2021

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 11, 2021): Scrambled Body Parts

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 11, 2021): Scrambled Body Parts
Q: Think of part of the body in seven letters. Add an "N" and rearrange all the letters to name two more parts of the body (none related to the original word). What body parts are these?
Edit: I didn't want to draw too much attention to the picture, but images 1 and 3 were definitely clues.
A: KNEECAP + N --> NAPE, NECK

194 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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    1. That's what I got, too, in less than a minute, which is rare for me.

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    2. I got that one too but think the intended answer must be a different one.

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    3. My answer jibes with Rob's description, but I am like Charles, and think it's not the intended. But, I'm done.

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    4. Unrelated, yet so related.

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    6. I've come up with the same answer as Ron, which I think is the intended one, but I thoroughly enjoy some of the creative alternates.

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    7. Leo, I think you are including TMI that is not part of the puzzle.

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    8. If you strain to hard you could develop a painful fistula.

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    9. I believe I also have the above-referenced answer.

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    10. Rob: I just got that same one. I think so did SDB.

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  3. A "close but no cigar" answer:
    EARDRUM + N -> UNDERARM. Only one part.

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    1. I believe this excellent riff from geofan, because it anagrams to one word rather than two, is a bit superior to the puzzle it riffs.

      LegoWhoNotesInQuotes:"AndThatIsSayin'Sumpthin'SinceMrBaggishIsAMasterPuzzleMaker!"

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    1. I just finished your second book," Meeting Jesus for the first time."

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    2. Resistance is futile, Plantsmith!

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  6. A word that is related to the answer contains two proper names.

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    1. I can think of two well-known people with those names who have the same surname.

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    2. Very excellent observations, both Nodd and Paul. The year that one of Paul's well-known people died, the other was awarded a prestigious award and coveted trophy.

      LegoWhoBelievesTheTwoCommentsAboveFormTheBasisOfAnNPRWorthyPuzzle!

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    4. Thanks for the comments, Paul and Lego; I only knew of one of the two people. Regarding Lego's suggestion about a possible NPR-worthy puzzle, I vaguely recall that this property of the related word was remarked upon here in the context of a previous NPR puzzle involving body parts, but I have no more definitive recollection than that.

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    5. Any time I think of ELLA, I immediately think of FITZGERALD. I didn't really know who Pat Fitzgerald was, but the name sounded familiar and sports related, which a search quickly confirmed.

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  7. The jury is still out on this puzzle.

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    1. The Derek Chauvin trial involves a knee and a neck.

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  8. ASSHOLE + N anagrams to LASH + NOSE, but I don't think Will's going there.

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    1. John Boehner would appreciate it, though.

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    2. Jan, I found that one too, along with the related TRACHEA + N > HEART, CAN

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    3. My anagrammer came up with a very un-NPR X-rated answer to a private body part that names an action. Not posting.

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    4. Well Jan, since you went "there", "eyebrow(n)" probably isn't a very good place to start, either.

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    5. For you horror movie fans, here is another gory alternative unintended answer: VISCERA + N = SCAR, VEIN

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    6. Jan, I can't even believe you went there. Or that Blaine allowed it on the blog in the first place. Or that somehow you managed to actually fit the criteria of the original puzzle with it. I bow to your great audacity, good sir(or madam, as it is a gender-neutral name, so forgive me if I don't know for sure).
      pjbWouldLikeToPointOutThe"P"InPjbStandsForPatrick,NotPatricia

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    7. I got tired of anagramming 7-letter body parts that didn't work. And I'm a male, though my parents told me I would have been Jan in either case.

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    8. PJB,
      Please don't tell jan this, but we choose our given name prior to our birth, just as we choose our parents.

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    9. Yes, please don't tell jan that!

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    10. jan, I had no idea you would see that! So sorry, but it is true.

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    11. Globally, Jan is used more as a male name. The US has more female Jans (Jan Brady effect?)

      Stats on the first name Jan: (1880--2019) Total: 566,186 Female 56,458 Male 509,728. Most popular in Czechoslovakia where >90% of Jans are male.

      And, of course, for 31 days in the beginning of every year we are all Jan-happy.

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    12. What is going on here? Are we having a Jan session?

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    13. I must ask my granddaughter about the truth of this theory, as she's within a couple of years of the event, and has an excellent memory. As far as choosing names goes, she likes meeting dogs in the park and feeding them treats that we bring along. After being introduced to a black poodle named Pasta the other day, she informed Pasta's owner that that wasn't a good name. Asked what her name was, she replied, "Anna, thassa good name!"

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    14. Plato (ancient Greece) — A divine guide informs an assembly of souls ready for birth: “No divine guardian shall draw lots for you, but you shall choose your own guardian and destiny.”


      Plotinus (3rd century Greece) — Each soul selects its body, parents, birthplace, and circumstances of life. Then, as if a herald were summoning it, “the soul comes down and goes into the appropriate body.”


      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUT7ODqnFlo

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  9. TRACHAE + N gives HEART + CAN, but don't think Will would like that one either.

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  10. Went back to bed and got it quickly. However I like jan's alt answer more.

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  11. Easier than last week's challenge, n'est-ce pas?

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  12. This is a good puzzle for BALD NERDS.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. As an Engineer, who has lost his hair, I qualify (with pride!) as a bald nerd.

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    3. Wear your pocket protector with pride!

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    4. Or a good puzzle for someone whose bald head is HUGE.

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    5. DDX - I never used a pocket protector, but I still have my slide rule, and remember how to use it.

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  13. Name a 7 letter body part and add an "N". Rearrange the letters to name a charitable medical athletic event in two words.

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  14. One reminds me of a fenestration.

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  15. I found another interesting alternative answer (wrong, but still interesting). The first word can be a part of your body – sometimes – as the result of an illness or medical condition. According to Dictionary.com, a fistula is a “a narrow passage or duct formed by disease or injury, as one leading from an abscess to a free surface, or from one cavity to another.” Add an “n” and you can anagram it into ulna and fist, somewhat more satisfying than the intended answer, I think.

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    1. Chuck, this was the first answer I came up with, and I still haven't come up with anything better! I suppose it depends on whose body we're talking about, but I know Will won't like it...

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  16. An old dinosaur's memory of the back row of the movie theater on a Saturday night date!

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    1. Had thought about replying "Was that as far as it went?" but feared it might be TMI.

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  17. I think I've got it now, but about that first, "weird" answer I came up with: if you pluralize it first by adding an "s," and then add the "n", and then anagram, you'll get two other body parts, the alpha and omega, so to speak.

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  19. Think of the same body part in seven letters. Add the ROT14 of an “N” and rearrange all eight letters to name a second body part and a part of a dining room set (neither which is related to the original 7-letter body part). Spell a slang term for a third body part backward and place it after the second body part and also after the dining-room-set part to form a pair of compound words.
    What three body parts, dining-roon-set part, and pair of compound words are these?
    or....
    Think of the same body part in seven letters. Add a letter other than an "N" and rearrange all eight letters to name two words, each which form a new compound word if you place a word for a farm creature in front of them.
    What is this body part is this?
    What are the two new compound words you can form?

    LegoWhoForAChangeLuckedOutAndSolvedSteveBaggish'sFinePuzzleEarlierThanUsual(ForHimAnyway)AndSoHasBegunToComposeRiffOffPuzzlesLikeTheTwoAboveTohatHeShallPostOnThisFriday'sEditionOfPuzzleria!

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  20. Replies
    1. Funny. As the proud owner of a banjo AND a sebaceous cyst (closely related to the wen), I can assure you that neither is a body part. Although I did play a banjo so much that it felt like an extension of my body. And the sebaceous cyst occured in an area close to the area of the intended answer.

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  22. Easy puzzle to follow the hard one last week. Reminds me of a puzzle from a year ago.

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  23. Think of the name of a country in seven letters. Add an "N" and rearrange all the letters to name two more countries

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    1. Nice riff, Rudolfo.

      LegoWhoObservesThatOneOfTheTwoResultantCountriesAppearsIntactWithinRudolfo'sSevenLetterCountry

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  24. Pretty easy one! Additional cinema clue: Monty Python.

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  25. You can also come up with two foods from the answer.

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    1. I must not have the intended answer as I am always coming up with one nice dish and inedible leftovers.

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  26. Anagram puzzles are just so mixed-up.

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    1. "Just so" mixed-up is jousts.

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    2. Paul, indeed.

      In many cases, the up or down in both mixed-up or mixed-down seems superfluous.

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  27. Replies
    1. A bushel and a peck and a hug around the neck
      A hug around the neck and a barrel and a heap

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  28. Two of the body parts are near each other.

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    1. Yeah, and one is closer than the other, right?

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    2. The nape is the back of the neck.

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  29. The King’s string’s broken.

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  30. It would be interesting if I got the call(for the second time)this Thursday. That's my birthday! And even if I don't, tomorrow afternoon Turner Classic Movies, who has been showing movies in alphabetical order since Apr. 1st, will get around to my favorite of all time, "It's A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World", from 4:30PM to 7:00PM, so that's enough of a present for me.
    pjbKnowsTheBig"W"InTheFilmDoesn'tStandFor"Will",ButThinksItShould

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  31. Happy B.D. Cranberry. How about also "What's up Pussycat?" Westworld or Waterworld.?

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    1. I believe it was "What's NEW Pussycat?", and "What's UP Tiger Lily?"(or of course, "What's Up, Doc?").
      pjb'sFavorite"W"SongsInclude"WildThing"(the Troggs),"WhatAboutMe?"(QuicksilverMessengerService),"Winning"(Santana)," WomanTonight"(America),"WorkToDo"(AverageWhiteBand),"WhereToNowSt.Peter?"(EltonJohn),"WalkLikeAnEgyptian"(theBangles),And"WaitingForAGirlLikeYou"(Foreigner)

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  32. I just finished feeding my two Corgis. This week (as opposed to last)means that with the current puzzle I can now go back to sleep without obsessing about the answer. No clue, just fact!

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  33. Good morning again. It was good to rest my head on the pillow.

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  34. By not giving the trachea answer the old RBA, Blaine gives Will Shortz ammunition for ignoring a valid answer, a 34 year long insult to Sunday Puzzle players.

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  35. ALTERNATIVE RELATED PUZZLES:

    1) Take the same puzzle only add an R instead of an N

    2) Take the same puzzle only instead of naming two body parts, name two places you can put a body after death

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  36. Seems like the body part may go by some other names.....

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  37. This body part + T anagrams to a superhero’s name, and part of the superhero’s costume

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    1. Why "none" instead of "neither?"

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    2. Good point, Mendo Jim. Good point too, Wolfgang, but that particular cat escaped the bag Sunday morning with Rob's first post of the day, subsequently evoking amens in multiple replies, including one from your fine self. The fact that the thread survived had me thinking that it was not the intended answer, but I eventually concluded that it probably was. Still, it was jan's classic that won the week!

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    3. Yes, Lancek, and after the TMI concern was first raised on Sunday, we knew to steer clear of "that particular cat," for the benefit of those who hadn't spotted it, yet. But—just under seven hours as of this writing, and we can call out the cat all we want! (Thanks, DDX. And thanks, Blaine.)

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    4. Apologies all around, especially to Rob and Blaine. In hindsight, though, I'm changing my metaphor from cats and bags to horses and barn doors.

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  41. Replies
    1. Things quieting down there?

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    2. A memento from the bad old days, when both IRA and Unionist gunmen would enforce their own private systems of justice by kneecapping those they judged guilty. And, yes, Jan, things have quieted down since 1975.

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    4. I was wondering whether things had quieted down since a couple of weeks ago.

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    5. Having spent some time years ago in Belfast (my wife has family there as well as in Dublin in the Republic), I recall the Falls Road and the prohibitions on parking downtown because of the fear of car bombs. She even has a harrowing tale about a close encounter with--and escape from--a dangerous, potentially life-threatening, IRA roadblock.

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    6. I hope nobody thought that I was actually writing from Belfast. I meant instead to refer to that cheery genre of "Greetings from ..." postcards that once were popular.

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  43. KNEECAP + N = NECK, NAPE

    "Ok, next." Next sounds a bit like NECK.

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  44. KNEECAP + N —> NECK + NAPE

    My first, “weird” answer was “scapula.” If you add an “n” and then anagram, it will yield, among other things, “ulna” and “caps” (as in "kneecaps," which led me to the intended answer).

    But, in an 7-to-8-to-9-letter exercise, if you pluralize “scapula” to “scapulas” (of which we have two), add the “n,” and then anagram, you get “scalp” and “anus.” Hence, “the alpha and omega, so to speak.”

    “The King’s string’s broken”: According to Wikipedia, from 1956 to 1958, Elvis Presley had 6 songs in Billboard’s Top Ten that reached #1 (“Love Me Tender” through “Don’t”), a string broken by “Wear My Ring Around Your Neck,” which only reached #2. I was concerned that if I If I had categorized this as a musical clue, it might’ve been TMI.

    But try as I might, I couldn’t find a song by Elvis—or anyone else for that matter—entitled “Wear My Ring Around Your Nape.”

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    1. The plural of Scapula can be scapulas or scapulae.

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    2. Yes, Natasha, that's true. I looked at "scapulae" + "n" and it also anagrammed to "caps" (plus "ulnae"). But a funny, if non-NPR-appropriate answer, was ""anus"-"place"!

      Jan?

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  45. KNEECAP + N -> NAPE + NECK

    (I also submitted VISCERA + N -> SCAR + VEIN, LINGULA + N -> LUNG + NAIL, TRACHEA + N -> HEART + CAN, ASSHOLE + N -> LASH + NOSE.)

    > JAWBONE + N -> BANJO + WEN

    I swear that I hadn't yet solved the puzzle when I posted this. Just trying out anagrams of "jawbone", and "banjo" immediately reminded me of this old Gary Larsen cartoon. I thank Blaine for his forbearance.

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    1. I'm embarrassed by how many body parts I tried after "patella", before it finally occurred to me to consider "kneecap". Also, I'm surprised no one referred to the northwest corner (#1 position, as we usually read) in Blaine's photo.

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    2. Jan, I wasn't sure I should post viscera on Sunday, but when I saw your legitimate, if off-color unintended answers, I decided to go for it.
      And they let it stay.

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  46. kneecap + n = nape, neck

    Last Sunday I said, “One reminds me of a fenestration.” Fenestration --> window --> pane --> nape.

    I found another interesting alternative answer – wrong of course, but still interesting. The first word can be part of your body – sometimes – as the result of an illness or medical condition. According to Dictionary.com, a fistula is a “a narrow passage or duct formed by disease or injury, as one leading from an abscess to a free surface, or from one cavity to another.” Add an “n” and you can anagram it into ulna and fist, somewhat more satisfying than the intended answer, I think.

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  47. KNEECAP (patella) + NNECK + NAPE. Nape of the neck is different from the whole neck.

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  48. Kneecap>>>Nape/Neck
    I was trying to type this entry and my cat jumped on the keyboard so I nearly posted 7 minutes early. Hit the delete button and started again - with the cat in lockdown.

    Nothing else to add - other than I really liked some of the alternate answers posted here.

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  49. Our friend Chuck has created an ingenious puzzle that involves an international brand and antonyms from the realm of religion. It is a truly elegant and NPR-worthy puzzle, but it may be too tough for your run-of-the-mill NPR listeners. But it is not too tough for that subset of NPR listeners who also happen to be Blainesvillians and Puzzlerians! Will you find it challenging? Sure. But every one of you has the proper chops to solve it!
    And so, we are proud to publish it for you on Puzzleria! come early Friday, Midnight PDT.
    Also on this week's menus are:
    * a Schpuzzle of the Week involving "blank verbse,"
    * a puzzle about raising funds, but them blowing them,
    * eight body-part riff-offs of this week's NPR puzzle that Dr. Frankenstein would be proud of "harvesting," and
    * a Dessert about "keeping up appearances."
    In other business:
    On Sunday, here on Blaine's blog, I posted a pair of NPR puzzle riff-offs:
    A. Think of the body part that is the answer to Steve Baggish’s NPR puzzle, in seven letters. Add the ROT14 of an “N” and rearrange all eight letters to name a second body part and a part of a dining room set.
    Spell a slang term for a third body part backward and place it after the second body part and dining-room-set part to form a pair of compound words.
    What three body parts, dining-roon-set part and pair of compound words are these?
    B. Think of the body part that is the answer to Steve Baggish’s NPR puzzle, in seven letters. Add a letter other than an "N" and rearrange all eight letters to name two words, each which form a new compound word if you place a word for a common oviparous creature infront of them. What is this body part is this? What are the two new compound words you can form?

    The answer to (A.) is:
    PATELLA, LAP, "POT" (Slang for stomach); TABLE; TABLETOP, LAPTOP (POT spelled backward is TOP)
    PATELLA+B=>TABLE+LAP; Table(top) Lap(top)
    The answer to (B.) is:
    KNEECAP; HENBANE. HENPECK
    KNEECAP+B=>BANE+PECK

    LegoWhoInvitesAllOfBlainesvilleTo"JoinUs"OnPuzzleria!(DoctorFrankensteinWould!)

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  50. I also had CARPALS (+N): SCALP and RNA (I don’t know if they’d count it but the wording of “parts of the body” versus “body parts” gave me some confidence).

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    1. I submitted this as an alternative, too, as I have broken carpals several times over the years. Better those than a kneecap.

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  51. Curtis: I thought your superhero comment was too much information but it was not removed. Cape and Kent. Cape would have led to Kneecap immediately I thought. Most superheroes have capes. But at least I knew my answer was correct.

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  52. Like many others, I came up with Kneecap + N, Nape and Neck. The only thing making me unsure was the fact that the nape is indeed a part of the neck.

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  53. This challenge makes me want to ask a question I
    used to ask regularly:
    Why is it a secret how much NPR (hence, all of us) pays Will Shortz?
    An alternative answer would be:
    If it is not a secret, how much is it?

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  54. My clue, that a word related to the answer contains two proper names, referred to patella and Pat and Ella. Paul noted two well-known people have those names and the same surname (Pat Fitzgerald and Ella Fitzgerald). Lego noted Pat Fitzgerald won an award and a trophy (as a linebacker at Northwestern) the year Ella Fitzgerald died (1996).

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  55. I was wondering if anyone else thought a puzzle juxtaposing KNEECAP, NAPE, and NECK might be in questionable taste at this particular point in time...
    ...then I re-read some of marcus of borg's hints ...

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    1. I hadn't thought of that connection (to my chagrin) but now that you mention it I agree the puzzle is in questionable taste. I presume the timing was just coincidental.

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    2. Yup, tone deaf puzzle at this time.

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  56. Agree. The last time this puzzle was used, it hadn't the baggage that it now carries. Poor taste.

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  57. Agree. Not very smart to give this puzzle at this time.

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    1. While I did not like this puzzle, I see no reason why it was inappropriate at this time. I think the PC police should be defunded.

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    2. SDB,

      Freud wrote a whole monograph on jokes and their relationship to the unconscious. His thesis was that the laughter is a response to suddenly being confronted by something the person had inside of which they weren't all that aware. The laughter was seen as a release. Perhaps its BS, but it helps to understand why some people get offended by a joke. I'll send you a bill for my consultation!

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    3. Cap,

      I suspect Freud was one of those people who do not have a sense of humor. I am not a follower of Freud. That theory has got to be the most stupid explanation for why something is funny that I have ever heard. Send me that bill, but it will go with all the others I never seem to get around to.

      Isn't it wonderful we now have another body part that cannot be mentioned in "polite company"?

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    4. If you think the monograph is stupid, I think I didn't do it justice. If you have the inclination to read it, see if your library has a copy. He was a good writer (Whether or not you agree with him) and was very proud of having been awarded the Goethe for literature. If you do, we can take potshots at each other without anyone else understanding them. Have a good weekend.

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    5. PS the Goethe prize. Typo...I have to hunt and peck having never taken a typing course.

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    6. I checked online with both the Seattle and King County libraries with no results on Freud re: jokes. Lots on dreams though. I have a lot to read right now, but besides that, I don't really care what Freud thought about humor. I know what I think, and I think there can be humor in just about anything and it doesn't have to mean something negative, but of course it can be used to hurt.

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    7. True enough about how it can be used to hurt

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    8. Cap,

      A couple of years ago I was invited to dinner at the expensive home of friends a block away. He is a few years older and she a few younger than I. After we dined we retired to the living room for port and further conversation. This couple is not known for their sense of humor, and so I hold back because most of my adlibs tend to go completely over their heads. However the topic of jokes and humor came up (I probably should plead guilty here, but don't really remember why) and I said that I thought my Abe Lincoln joke is probably my favorite. Nancy, without having heard the joke, replied, "Why would you make a joke about Lincoln?" I don't believe I even tried to answer that question.

      Well, Nancy died last November from cancer she had been fighting for a long time. Due to the pandemic there was no service and her body was cremated right away. A week or less after she passed I happened to walk past their house on my way to the cemetery, for a walk, at the end of the block and happened to see her husband walk out to his garden and open a container and toss its contents toward the middle of the garden. I immediately thought I could say something like, "I thought you were going to wait for Summer before tossing Nancy out." Of course that would have been inappropriate, and so I stayed silent. But then Dave said, "Well there goes Nancy." I knew this was not true because he had told me her ashes were to be scattered months later by her hiking pals.

      So, you see humor can be very complicated and if Freud tried to put it into a neat little package he was way off the mark.

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    9. Yes, as I have said before, when a body is delivered to a crematorium it is always received with a warm welcome.

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    10. Have you ever thought of going into a crematorium to ask, "What's cooking?" I have, but refuse to do it.

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    11. The closest crematorium is only a 15 minute walk from my house. Since the pandemic I don't visit, but wait outside for takeout.

      For an exercise in futility try to convince someone who believes "ashes" are ash that there is no ash in a cremation, but bone is left over and they grind it up so it can urn its keep.

      We used to "scatter" it out of our airplanes, but you had to be careful the pilot was turning to the right or the bone dust would take the paint of the plane. If one is going into a new line of work it pays to bone up on these details.

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    12. SDB, there are times when you're crazy. I don't mean that to sound like its coming from a retired shrink, which it is, but rather,that you're funny as hell!.

      Since retirement, I've become a potter and one day I quipped, "may all your crackpots be made of clay only!

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    13. There was a crematorium in my old town that allowed public tours. The sign outside read "Remains To Be Seen."

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  58. KNEECAP, NAPE, NECK
    Happy 51st to yours truly today!
    pjbRemindingY'allThatHavingOneMoreBirthdayIsWayBetterThanHavingNoMoreBirthdays!

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  59. Happy Birthday! Hope you had lots of delicious cake and ice cream. My bd was recently. I think sdb had one around april 3. Cheers!

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  60. If anyone read and was interested in the alternative puzzles I posted, below are the answers.


    ALTERNATIVE RELATED PUZZLES:

    1) Take the same puzzle only add an R instead of an N

    - EYEBALL + R >>> EAR & BELLY

    2) Take the same puzzle only instead of naming two body parts, name two places you can put a body after death

    - URETHRA + N >>> URN & EARTH

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  61. I had a comment above:
    "Or a good puzzle for someone whose bald head is HUGE."
    A person whose bald head is huge could be described as ALL PATE, which anagrams to PATELLA, another word for kneecap.

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  62. I am sure there is no truth to the rumor going around that Raúl Castro will soon be moving to England and residing in Buckingham Palace.

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  63. The only problem is that NAPE isn’t a body part. It is an area on the body.

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    1. Does that mean the navel is not a body part?

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    2. SDB: The navel would indeed be considered a body part...otherwise known as the ‘umbilicus’

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    3. Will managed to mix in "body part" with "part of the body" just enough to obscure the matter.
      Using "none" instead of "neither" further confused things, intentionally or not.
      Like Farmers, he's learned a thing or two in 34 years.

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  64. I have gone ahead and watched the strange parade of Jeopardy hosts. Or was it the parade of strange hosts?

    It made all fans appreciate Alex Trebek all the more.

    I will not watch this summer when Joe Buck is scheduled.

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    1. You're kidding. Or mistaken. I hope.

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    2. As far as I can tell, the upcoming guest hosts are Anderson Cooper, Bill Whitaker, Mayim Bialik, Savannah Guthrie, and Sanjay Gupta.

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    3. Perhaps one of our colleagues who's in touch with The Other Side can tell us whether Alex is spinning in his grave?

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  65. Alex is spinning like an axel, and that's no yarn.

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  66. This week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from listener Theodore Regan, of Scituate, Mass. Name a famous actor — 4 letters in the first name, 7 letters in the last. You can change the first letter of the actor's first name to name a bird. And you can change the first letter of the actor's last name to name a mammal. Who's the actor?

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    1. Super-easy! Theo must have come up with this one while on vacation.

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    2. Musical clue:
      Quadrophenia and My Generation.

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    3. The actor’s name can be anagrammed to a phrase that might mean someone’s fate if they choose to forgo the COVID vaccine.

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  67. Over 800 correct answers this week. No mention of alternate answers.

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  68. So, just another week without a puzzle.

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