Sunday, November 07, 2021

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Nov 7, 2021): What's in Your Kitchen?

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Nov 7, 2021): What's in Your Kitchen?
Q: Name a variety of song and a genre of music. Switch the initial consonant sounds of these two words, and, phonetically, you'll name an object found in the kitchen. What is it?
I'm sure there are many obvious clues we could give, but let's not give it away.

Edit: Let's --> Let us --> Lettuce --> Salad
A: BALLAD, SOUL --> SALAD BOWL

228 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. Remove all...speak of the devil!

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  3. Change four letters in the kitchen object to get something you might see on television.

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    2. I've reconsidered my answer and rescind the above. I'll be around, though.

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    1. I'm really terrible at categorizing music, so I don't really know if the song I first thought of after solving qualifies as a SOUL BALLAD.
      But, assuming it does:
      Etta James > Etta J > Jetta > VW > WV > almost heaven > "paradise, approximately"

      Finally!

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  9. I like to listen to a rap tune while eating a tuna wrap.

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  10. I can think of a song of that variety, in that genre of music... but of course I'm not allowed to give any examples... Oh maybe I can actually ostend my favorite example!

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  11. Philadelphia is the home of the original one. No, not Double Dutch Bus.

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  12. It's not a spoon, but it is a spoonerism. Why didn't Will just use the easier term?

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    1. Because every time he does, we have to fight about what is and isn't a spoonerism?

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    2. And usually spoonerisms are funny speaking errors -- tips of the slung ;).

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    3. I wondered that too, Cap, since the spoon connection would certainly not have been TMI. Then I realized that it's not quite a spoonerism. Then I thought, well, with a little change in the directions it could have been. Then I realized that, no, it really couldn't have.

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  13. Like solving last week's puzzle, a map may be helpful. It's cute.

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  14. Almost sounds like a puzzle better timed for next month.

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  15. The first type of song that occurred to me led right to the answer...

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  16. Easy one last week and easier one this week. A have several of these objects in my kitchen but am guilty of not using them often.

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  17. Think of a singer in this genre, repeat a letter in the first name, then add an "s" after the last, to get an example of the kitchen item's first word.

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  18. I assume everyone has come up with the variation involving a snoopy aficionado.

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  19. I found a type of food that fits the answer, and the food can, of course, be found in a kitchen. I might get another answer by inspiration, but I am not hunting anymore.

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  20. I'm thinking of a lake in England.

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    1. (That's Rudyard Lake, as in Kipling, as in Barrack-Room Ballads.)

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  21. I wouldn't say that I have this specific item in my kitchen. Many other items can serve the same purpose.

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    1. I'm with you! I don't own this specific item either since it's easy enough to improvise with other non-specific items I own.

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  22. Ree Drummond took it to the next level!

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  23. Reminds me of a mode of transportation as well.

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  24. Replies
    1. Let's=let us, which sounds like "lettuce", which is in a salad bowl.

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  25. Happy Four Seasons Landscaping Day (first anniversary) to all who observe!

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    1. Check out the Fiverr Super Bowl LV commercial featuring Four Seasons Total Landscaping. My daughter-in-law worked on it, but until it was aired and because she was sworn to secrecy, none of us, including her own husband, knew about it.

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  26. Well, most of us sound like we're done with this puzzle. Therefore here's a puzzle for anyone who cares, but SBD, I know you'd be able to do it. There is are two cities spelled exactly the same, one in the USA , the other in Europe pronounced differently by their respective inhabitants. What is the name of the city and how is it pronounced in each country?

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    1. Well, there is a city in my native state of Missouri that is spelled exactly the same as a city in France. It is O.K. if I answer here, isn't it?

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    2. We are celebrating with a cup of covfefe.

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    3. C a p, there are several. Here are 20 of them .

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    4. An excellent example, although not the intended one, is Berlin. I have never heard it pronounced correctly in this country.

      Here is a companion puzzle. Think of a common color that is pronounced identically in English and German, but spelled differently.

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    5. Nope. You are not reading the puzzle properly.

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    6. CaP, yeah, a whole lot of European city names were taken over for US cities and pronounced... rather differently! The first one I thought of was "Milan" (in upstate NY), but there are scads of them.
      SDB: 'braun'? It depends on how picky one is about the pronunciation. I think a German saying "brown" in English would likely pronounce it exactly the same as "braun"...

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    7. I am bilingual in German, and I can't think of the answer, except possibly of what Crito said. 🙄

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    8. Yes, Brown & braun is the answer. They are both pronounced EXACTLY the same. Wernher von Braun is completely butchered by Americans. It is properly pronounced Ver (as in air) nair phone brown. Vairnair phone brown. The AU in German is pronounced the way we say ow like when you hurt yourself or the OW in owl. It is NEVER pronounced like brahn.

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    9. Wolfgang is another name/word we butcher. It is volfgahng. A long O and ah like for the doctor to look in your mouth.

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    10. Sorry to report, SDB, but the pronunciation is not exactly the same. The German "r" is much different from the English one, and the "ow" sound is different as well (less palatal). If you heard a German speaker pronounce just the "ow" sound, an English speaker would detect an accent.

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    11. Where did you learn German? If you learned it in this country then you did not learn it properly. I learned it in Germany. Brown and braun are pronounced identically. That was one of the first things I learned from my native German teacher while I lived in Germany.

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    12. Incidentally, the o and a in "Wolfgang" are both short--the o is close to the o in "gone," and the a sound is close to the u in "hush."

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    13. But: You are right--being American, I "mangle" the pronunciation of my own name. I say it just like the two English words "wolf"-"gang," as most people would. 😉

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    14. Nope!
      https://forvo.com/word/wolfgang/ The first gets it wrong and the other three get it right, but the third one does it best.

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    15. They do enunciate it slowly, but other than that, they are making my point. 🙂

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    16. I think you are hearing it incorrectly. They are making my point.

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    17. Okay yeah, I guess the vowels really are the same. I think the context of other German words (vs. other English words) was making the diphthong sound slightly different to me.
      But the 'r' is certainly different. In German it's an 'ʁ'. (Let's see if the comments allow IPA characters.)

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    18. And again, "brown" and "braun" are not pronounced "identically." The guttural-palatal-labial-nasal nuances, as well as the diphthong, are different left and right. Yes, the meaning will be unmistakable, but the accent will be as well. See Crito's comment.

      I don't want to say that native German teacher shortchanged you. They probably wanted to make it easy to assimilate.

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    19. Crito, you had it right the first time. The diphthong is subtly different between "brown" and "braun." It's part of what people notice as an accent.

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    20. You didn't say where you learned German. If you didn't learn it in Germany then you cannot possibly learn it the way they speak it. I can pronounce it with the accent too, but that does not change it being the same.

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    23. I did learn it in Germany. I am native-fluent, having grown up speaking it. I am fully bilingual. I have heard "braun" (and--especially--"Wolfgang") said a gazillion times. That's how your companion puzzle had me baffled--because "pronounced identically" is not the same as "being the same."

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    24. You may be referring to accent and not pronunciation. I can pronounce brown/braun with either American English or German accent and it is still the exact same pronunciation other than the accent. We all have a unique voice. Were you born to German parents and raised until adulthood in Germany? Or perhaps came here mid childhood. All of this will affect pronunciation. I stand behind what I stated in the puzzle. We may be trying to add apples and oranges with this conversation. We here spell aunt the same way, but pronounce it very differently depending on how we heard it growing up, and that is what I am saying about brown/braun. The way Americans pronounce braun is absurd and totally wrong, just as the way we mispronounce Anne Frank. It is not the accent, but the basic pronunciation.

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    26. Maybe this little story from my childhood will help explain. When I entered junior high school at the ripe old age of twelve, elf to you Wolfie, a teacher informed us as to the correct pronunciation of our principal, Mr. Breit. I guess they wanted us to get it reight, oops, right, but missed a wonderful opportunity for teaching. They wanted to clarify what we had been told about I before E, excepting after C. Well they missed that opportunity big time. I suppose they were Democrats. Much later when I arrived in Germany at eighteen I learned why this anomaly with I and E. Too bad my teachers were so ignorant of German they did not know that when I and E are adjacent in a German word the first letter is always not pronounced, but the second is pronounced long. So IE is E and EI is I.

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    28. Yeah, you may be right about the apples and oranges. And to think how even two apples can be so different (think Granny Smith vs. Golden Delicious vs. Gala etc. etc.). Anyway, I give you props for being observant about some Americans not seeming to care about German beyond watching Hogan's Heroes. Germans do tend to take more pride in getting the "basic pronunciation" of English words right.

      Oh, and speaking of apples and oranges: The one color I can think of that is pronounced differently but spelled the same in English and German is...orange! 😄

      PS: 'Twelve' is still zwölf. (Don't take away from the years you've earned!)

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    29. I started to spell it that and then changed it to elf. I learned it as elf, but for some reason know the other spelling and pronunciation too, but do not know why or what the difference is now.

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    30. Yes, and I know I posted this on this blog before, but it Ber(lin)s to be repeated.
      I was stationed just at the edge of Wurzburg, forgive the spelling, at Emery Kaserne, a.k.a. Adolph Hitler Kaserne. I cannot imagine why we changed it after we took it over on the very day of my birth, but they did. Division headquarters was located on the opposite side of the city. One hot sunny summer day I was walking alone back from headquarters on a day off and decided to stop and cool off a bit with ein bier at some place I encountered about halfway back in the middle of town. I adapted quickly to local customs and asked the much older German gentleman sitting alone at a table if I might join him. He invited me to sit down and it turned out he spoke some English. We had a wonderful conversation, but it stumbled, due to my ignorance, when he mentioned Sheena. I had no idea what he was talking about, but kept thinking of the TV show that excited my father and was named, Sheena, Queen of the Jungle. Eventually I realized he was referring to China. We both a a good laugh about that. I still think about it from time to time.

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    31. You got me for a moment with your zwölf comment. It completely threw me off and made me forget it meant, not eleven, but twelve. I was not referring to 12, but 11. I will sleep on it tonight and decide in the morgen if I will forgive you. LOL

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    33. That was the end of Daylight Saving Time throwing you off--you wanted to say "eleven" but your internal clock still thought "twelve." I don't know about you forgiving me, but you are certainly forgiven for that. 🤣

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    34. You are probably reit. I never had any problem with eleven and twelve in German before. It could be old age too, but let's not go there.

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    35. I'm going to jump into this discussion now that it's largely over to note that dialectical differences between German-speakers are far greater than those between English speakers, to the point that a speaker used only to Standard German might not be able to understand one speaking the Bavarian dialect of German. I'm hardly fluent in any version of German (two years of school left me with a few songs from Der Dreigroschenoper, The Ode to Joy, and some half-remembered poems by Heine, Tucholsky and Brecht) but when a coworker who had lived in Bavaria for a year gave me a sample of that dialect it sounded like a wholly different language. And, I'm told, even towns ten miles apart in some parts of Germany may have different words for a single object, concept or person. All of which is to say you're both right--the two words are more or less the same, subject to shades of difference that only a truly fluent speaker can detect.

      As for substituting "elf" for "zwölf," I thought you were making a clever pun off of "elf" and "elf" but typed the wrong number. I think eleven-year-old boys are more like demons than elves, but that was a long time ago.

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    36. Well, Italy Svevo, I am impressed! What you cite there, "Dreigroschenoper, The Ode to Joy, and ... poems by Heine, Tucholsky and Brecht" is a lot to get out of just two (!) years I of German in school. Must have been more literary/cultural studies than applied linguistics, I imagine. Among the literary greats you named, Bertolt Brecht stands out in that he was the one who wrote the lyrics to the Dreigroschenoper (the music being by his longtime collaborator Kurt Weill).

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    39. I cannot give away, right here, right now, how much or how little this may have to do with the variety of song, the genre of music, or the kitchen item. One kitchen (?) item certainly comes to mind, but...how relevant is it?

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    40. I live just one block from the largest cemetery in Seattle where several years ago as I was walking past a high priced secluded area I was asked by an older German woman if I would help by pulling the flower vase out of its sleeve in the ground beside the elaborate headstone above her late husbands grave. I was happy to help and after she refused to pay me the $50 compensation I demanded I noticed a second grave adjacent that apparently housed her also late daughter. I noticed the last name on that stone was Brecht. This woman was driving an S class Mercedes Benz and she had a strong German accent which caused me to ask about her and perhaps her connection to Bertolt Brecht. She informed me she worked at the UofW and I am sure by her attire she had a high position. However she told me she had no connection to Brecht and that he lived in the far North of Germany in East Berlin and that she was from Augsburg in the South. I held my tongue and did not tell her that Augsburg is where Brecht was born, raised and lived the first half of his life.

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    41. Well I would say it is cutting edge.

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    42. 🤣🤣🤣 Good one, SDB! 👍

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    43. Great story, SDB. As Der Arme B.B. himself said:

      Ich, Bertolt Brecht, bin aus den schwarzen Wäldern.
      Meine Mutter trug mich in die Städte hinein
      Als ich in ihrem Leibe lag. Und die Kälte der Wälder
      Wird in mir bis zu meinem Absterben sein.

      I, Bertolt Brecht, came out of the black forests.
      My mother moved me into the cities as I lay
      Inside her body. And the coldness of the forests
      Will be inside me till my dying day.

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    44. In 1966 while stationed in Würzburg I defied strict regulations and flew to West Berlin on vacation leave alone. I was forbidden travel to Berlin due to my extremely high security clearance, but knew how I could get them unknowingly to authorize my visit. I stayed just a few doors off the Kurfürstendamm kitty-corner from the famous Kempkinski Hotel at a pension on fasenenstrasse. It was magical and I shared a large upstairs room with 2 or 3 others, including an American ex lieutenant who was doing some kind of clandestine operations on the other side of the wall. I met several other very interesting guests there as my leave continued. There was a young German my age who had something to do with the operation of the pension and I got to know him somewhat. He spoke gud (sic) English and taught me a German tongue twister he said he could not recite well himself. Here it is:

      Der Leutnant von Leuthen befahl seinen Leuten nicht eher zu läuten, bis der Leutnant von Leuthen seinen Leuten das Läuten befahl.

      He also translated it for me and I immediately memorized it and still to this day can recite it perfectly. I have always wondered if that is because German is not my first tongue.

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    45. Okay, German is my first tongue, and I find this "tongue-twister" super-easy. There is another one, however, that is much shorter but gives me quite a hard time:

      Brautkleid bleibt Brautkleid und Blaukraut bleibt Blaukraut.

      The "Leutnant" one, I didn't even know. Then again, as a boy, before I learned what the origin of the word "Leutnant" was, I would associate it with both "Leute" and "läuten."

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    46. I hadn't heard that one before. I can do it, but not well. It is a hard one. If I practice I am sure I can do it well, but I am not about to waste more time on it.

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    47. To go back to cities pronounced differently in English, the list that Word Woman posted a link to didn't include Calais, Maine. That's pronounced like "callous."

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    48. I'm also not certain I have yet seen a mention of my personal favorite -- VERSAILLES Kentucky. It's pronounced ver-SAILS (locally in the USA) as opposed to vair-SIGH (in France).

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    49. My father took German in high school (easy, as his immigrant parents spoke Yiddish at home) in Rochester, NY, during the early years of World War II, before he got drafted. Every day, the teacher had the class stand up and sing Deutschland über alles.

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    50. Of course I say FauVay.

      That short list did not include Toledo, Ohio and Toledo, Spain either.

      My father took German and the pronunciations he was taught by a German immigrant were awful.

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    51. Then there's Goethe (rhymes with "both") Street in Chicago. At least that's how it used to be pronounced; it may have changed.

      When my wife and I were looking for a place to live in Los Angeles many years ago we kept hearing about a neighborhood called "Los Feel-es." I thought to myself, "I'll be damned, they used farmworker Spanish (in which "los files" might be used instead of "los campos") to name that place. But no, it turned out to be just another Anglo mangling of "Los Feliz."

      But then there are the Brits, who beat everyone in this department. Leghorn!

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    1. I didn't realize that I had opened Pandora's box. BTW, I don't know how Pandora got to be 351.5 miles from Seattle.

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    2. ^^^ C a p, my comment here refers to this week's NPR puzzle, not your add-on puzzle.

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    3. WW, I've never been offended by you

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    4. I wasn't sure if you meant to post your comment in the thread above this one (or not).

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  28. This week's NPR puzzle by Neville Fogarty is one of those "wish I woulda thoughta that" and "elegant in its simplicity" puzzles to which Will Shortz tends to be partial...
    And, now for something completely different...
    The current Puzzleria! "Schpuzzle of the Week" is one of those "inelegant in its complexity" puzzles that it is my curse to create:
    What's the ninth word in the following sequence?
    Oreo, net, worth, free, fir, vise, vexes, genie, _______
    Hint: The word has seven letters and is associated with puzzles.

    (Give hints to the answer if you wish, but not the answer. We post answers on Puzzleria! beginning at Noon PDT every Wednesday.)

    LegoProvidingABonusPuzzleForThoseWhoHaveSolvedMr.Fogarty'sFinePuzzle

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    1. Hmmmm. I have the basic idea, but the details are escaping me.

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    2. Correction:
      We now post answers on Puzzleria! beginning at Noon PST (Pacific StandardTime!

      LegoWhoSays"CritoThanksForYourPostButHowCanIHelpWithDetails?"

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    3. Oh, no, I meant: I can see the general outlines of (how to get the) answer, but some bits don't quite fit into place. For example, there is a matter of an extraneous 'R' (according to the method I came up with).

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  29. Well, props to Will for pronouncing Ayn correctly. I find this week's puzzle, however, less than satisfying.

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  30. It will be a toss-up between last week and this week for number of correct answers. BTW the genre, phonetically, is something else you might see in the kitchen.

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    1. BALLAD, SOUL --> SALAD BOWL. (Hints: "toss-up," as in tossed salad; soul, phonetically, is "sole," as in filet of.)

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  31. I thought the host got off to a rough start when she said the puzzle had been a difficult one, when it obviously, just by the numbers, was extremely easy.

    I just got up and was going to post a minor diatribe about the poor wording of the puzzle, and that it should have have been presented as a Spoonerism, but since I see it has been mentioned here earlier I will not say a word. You didn't read this; okay?

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  32. I’m sure we’ll have an Olympic number of correct answers this week.

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    1. We have too many young people trying to solve this puzzle now. You might have been right a few decades ago.

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  33. By the way, don't try pairing "scat" with "rock." Not that I give a darn.

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  34. Item is also often seen in another room.

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  35. Coming up with an appropriate comment, while not impossible, is more difficult than solving the puzzle.

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  36. Is "Santa Baby" a blues carol? Does a disorganized detective keep a clues barrel in the kitchen?

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  37. It so happens I got that item today as part of a related item.

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  38. Can’t help wondering if Alfred Kinsey would have an edge on this one.

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  39. TV Clue: Benny Hill
    pjbWouldLikeToPointOutThisClueHasNothingToDoWithScantilyCladWomen!

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    1. Himalayan cattle clad only in power strips would be sockety yaks, but I don't see what that has to do with puzzle.

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    2. BALLAD, SOUL, SALAD BOWL
      One time, Benny Hill was portraying the host of the British music program "Old Grey Whistle Test"(changed to "Tester" for the sketch), and he said Elton John would be on later "tackling a bowl full of salad", then corrected himself and said "a soulful ballad".
      pjbSaysIt'sOneOfThoseRareMomentsInBritishHumorThatHeEverActuallyGot

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  40. The Beatles. At first it was plastic.

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  41. Sometimes I work backwards solving the puzzles. I just read the blogs and avoided the puzzle statement. Did not take very long to solve.

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  42. If you read the first word of the kitchen item backwards and do the same with the music genre (taking some liberties), you get a prediction that surprisingly came true today.

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    1. I think this is TMI only if you know the answer. Many things happened today. You could search the internet for things that happened, and probably not find the phrase Snipper intended.

      However, in the future, I would phrase it as came true recently, to make it even harder for someone to stumble across it.

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    2. Snipper,
      I do not think your comment is TMI. I agree with Natasha that it is clever(!), however... and likely the most timely hint in Blainesville "hintory" history!

      LegoWhoIsAmazedByTheBrainpowerOnThisBlog!

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    3. JAWS: I agree. Guess Blaine is ok with it. Not easy if do not have answer.

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  43. Am I the only one, or does anyone else have a PurgeDunk™
    smoothie maker?

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    1. Don’t have one but glad the answer isn’t a Rap Crock.

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  44. I wonder if this could have been a Henry James novel...

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    1. Thanks for your clue it helped me solve the puzzle...Better late than never or until 3pm 'Thirstday'.

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  46. You don't make friends this way.

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    1. People said he was useless, them people all were fools

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    2. And his daring life of crime made him a legend in his time, east and west of the Rio Grande.
      pjbSaysNowIt'sAllOver...AndTheHarvestIsIn

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  48. Quote of the Day: “We are, after all, the greatest problem solvers to have ever existed on Earth. If working apart, we are a force powerful enough to destabilize our planet. Surely working together, we are powerful enough to save it.” —British broadcaster and documentary maker David Attenborough last week at COP 26 in Scotland.

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  49. SDB got there before I could. All I can say is that if I had known then what I know now I wouldn't have lost at Final Jeopardy. As Miles said "So what?"

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    1. Italo Svevo, were you on Jeopardy? What was your Final Jeopardy?

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    2. Italo, Would like to know also. Thanks.

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    3. By the time I came up with SALAD BOWL, which led me to Sally Bowles, SDB (look below) had already come up with the perfect hint for her and it. But then I remembered my very short stint on Jeopardy the first year of the Alex Trebek era. I was leading at the end of Double Jeopardy, but just by a little, plus the contestant to my left had been talking movie trivia ("In what movie did Tony Curtis say 'Yonda is my fadda's castle?'") while we watched the earlier episodes being shot, so I knew I had to bet enough to ensure I would win.

      The Final Jeopardy answer was "She won a best actress Oscar in 1973, her father won an Oscar in 1959 and her mother won a special baby Oscar in 1940." I was clueless but wrote "Jane Fonda," knowing it was wrong. The guy on my left bet everything but wrote "Katherine Hepburn," which was even wronger. And then there was the four-time champion (you could only appear five times before they brought on a new group back then) on my right who had no answer at all--but bet zero, correctly calculating that he could only win if the rest of us were wrong. And he was right, of course. Goes to show that knowing stuff is only part of it.

      At any rate, when I went back to work the next day and posed the Final Jeopardy question to my coworkers, half of them said, without pausing more than a second, "Liza Minnelli." Which is another lesson I learned from my one appearance on Jeopardy.

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    4. Great story, Italo Svevo. Thanks for sharing.

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  50. Skydiveboy, any thoughts on the delayed inflation of one of the parachutes on the recently returned Spacex Crew Dragon? It seems to me that using multiple chutes on a single object must be tricky, since once some chutes open, there's much less ram air pressure available to inflate the remaining one(s). Oddly, Spacex's nearest US competitor, the Boeing Starliner, had one of three chutes fail to deploy altogether during its pad abort test two years ago, though that wasn't nearly as serious a problem as all the others its suffered since.

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    1. I did not know of this. I do not fully understand the photo either. I would say that anytime 2 or more parachutes are deployed simultaneously it creates unusual air currents that could cause any number of strange occurrences. I had both the main and the reserve open together on a Tandem skydive once. It was caused by a modification by the manufacturer of the system. That change had to be grounded immediately. There is much more to the story, but it will have to wait for a verbal rendering.

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    2. What's seen in the photo (taken at night, in infrared, I believe) is the capsule beneath 3 fully inflated main chutes, with the fourth, second from right, deployed but not inflated. Did its slider just hang up for a while, maybe?

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    3. It looks to me like that chute is caught in a burble and there really is no air forcing its way in to open it due to the open one above. Sliders are used on square parachutes, i.e. ram air wings. They are to slow down the opening. They are not used on rounds. If you were making a base jump off a low bridge you might want to remove your slider so as to get a fast opening. And in that case you would not have much speed built up anyway.

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    4. Without a slider, what keeps a round chute from opening too suddenly?

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    5. Round and square chutes are very different. Squares at first did not have sliders, but they opened too hard and fast so sliders were invented. You can also get sliders at some happy hours. You can do things to slow an opening or to speed it up. Round reserves frequently have Taschengurts, or quick opening pockets sewn on in order to speed up the opening by producing little eddies of air. Sleeves may be used on some chutes to slow down an opening and reduce chance of malfunction. Paracommandeers use sleeves. Main rounds these days usually have diapers to help prevent malfunctions.

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    6. A slider on a round chute would cause a streamer.

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    7. You are welcome. I should also mention that contrary to common belief one does not need a parachute in order to skydive. It is considered a good idea though in case one wants to repeat the experience. I have always used one. I recommend it.

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    8. Even without a parachute, falling thousands of feet from a plane won't hurt you. But, that sudden stop at the end....

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  51. Vote with your foot, or with Moby Dick.

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  52. jan,
    With respect I have a question for you, a serious question, does an airplane fly?

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    Replies
    1. Not like I do...blue tights, cape and all!

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    2. Cap, You are making my point, although I suspect unintentionally.

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    3. I spent the morning at the New England Aquarium with the granddaughters. Several species of penguins frolicking there. You should never get into a plane with one. They can't fly, you know.

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    4. My point is that the airplane really does not fly, but is flown by the pilot. I am attempting a rather poor analogy to the brain, which many believe is what thinks, but it doesn't. The brain is simply an organ that allows us to think when we are in our body. Keep an open mind and stop trying to make preconceived ideas fit. Instead just research with an open mind.

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    5. The brain is the organ that allows us to think we think.

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    6. Exactly! However I doubt we are understanding that statement the same way. We are not the body. The body is the vehicle we inhabit in this dimension. It would be more correct to say that we are mind, which is not the brain.

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  53. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  54. I am not the only one, and I take no pride in my military service. I am, and have always been, very anti-war. Thanks for the thought anyway.

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  55. BALLAD, SOUL >>> SALAD BOWL

    "Oh my!" Reverse the sounds to get MAILLOT, a one-piece bathing suit >>> one-piece wooden SALAD BOWLS, my first big kitchen purchase.

    "Like solving last week's puzzle, a map may be helpful. It's cute." MAP as in MAPLE SALAD BOWL.

    "Even a child could solve this." >>> Julia Child >>> one of her signature dishes was sole (SOUL) meunière.

    Snipper, loved your "Dallas Loss" comment. I guess my two ! ! evaporated into the winning Denver Broncos ether ;-).

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  56. BALLAD & SOUL = SALAD BOWL

    My Hints:
    "Goodbye to Berlin" Christopher Isherwood is the author and one of the characters is Sally Bowles which sounds similar to salad bowls.
    "Colin Powell" All military generals wear a "salad bowl" of their medals on their dress uniforms.

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  57. SALAD BOWL (Ballad, Soul) And no, I've never found salads very satisfying.

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  58. BALLAD, SOUL => SALAD BOWL

    I had commented, "Change four letters in the kitchen object to get something you might see on television." The answer to that is SUPER BOWL.

    I was trying to be vague, and not even say it was four consecutive letters that are changed. I certainly did not want to say anything about sports, because it's too easy to think of the Super Bowl when sports on television is mentioned, and that can quickly lead to Salad Bowl.

    Then, of course, Jan made his comment, and I learned about the Salad Bowl as a sporting event.

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  59. BALLAD, SOUL -> SALAD BOWL

    >> Change four letters in the kitchen object to get something you might see on television.
    > Actually, 1948 - 1955....

    The SALAD BOWL was an annual post-season American college football bowl game played in Phoenix, Arizona, from 1947 to 1955.

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  60. Ballad, Soul>>>Salad Bowl

    My describing the difficulty of coming up with a clue, as difficult, but not “Impossible,” was a reference to the products of Impossible Meats, which are vegetarian, like most salads.

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  61. SALAD BOWL <— BALLAD, SOUL

    Hint #1: If it’s “not half bad,” it could be “all bad,” an anagram of “ballad.”

    Hint #2: “Mosaic” is one of 2 societal metaphors used by multiculturalists, particularly in Canada; the other, more common here in the U. S., is “salad bowl.”

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  62. BALLAD, SOUL — SALAD BOWL

    My “clues”:
    I got that item today as part of a related item.
    I had just picked up a salad spinner. One of its components is a bowl, which can be used to serve the salad in.

    And I occasionally play a genre variety.
    When the occasion presents itself, I might put on a soul ballad.

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  63. Four entertainingly challenging puzzles by our friend Chuck are featured on this week's Puzzleria! They will test your "pastimes-music-sports-and-shoes" savvy.
    Also on our menu:
    * a Schpuzzle of the Week involving racehorses and roundhouses,
    * an "Agricultivacation" puzzle slice,
    * a Dessert about the Roman goddess Diana "dancing o'er the rosy dawn," and
    * a big salad-bowlful of (ten!) riff-offs of this week's ballad-soulful NPR puzzle.
    Drop by and get "Conundrumbstruck by Chuck!"
    (The Puzzleria! puzzle we posted Sunday on this blog was:
    What's the ninth word in the following sequence?
    Oreo, net, worth, free, fir, vise, vexes, genie, _______
    Hint: The word has seven letters and is associated with puzzles.
    The answer is:
    "Hinting"
    The list consists of words formed by rearranging consecutive interior letters of consecutive pairs of the the integers from zero to nine. (For example the WO in tWO and the THR in THRee can be rearranged to spell WORTH):
    zEROOne=OREO
    oNETwo=NET
    tWOTHRee=WORTH
    thREEFour=FREE
    fouRFIve=FIR
    fiVESIx=VISE
    siXSEVEn=VEXES
    sevENEIGht=GENIE
    eIGHTNINe=HINTING)


    LegoRemindingAllBlainesvilliansThatWeUploadPuzzleriaEarlyFridayMorningJustAfterMidnightPacificStandardTime

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  64. Type or variety of song: BALLAD.
    Genre of music: SOUL music.
    Object found in the kitchen: SALAD BOWL.

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  65. ballad, soul --> salad bowl

    Last Sunday I said, “I’m thinking of Hank.” No, not Hank Williams – Hank Ballard and the Midnighters, a soul group of “Finger Poppin’ Time” fame. Plus, drop the “r” in Ballard and you get ballad.

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  66. Now that the answer has been published....I tried, unsuccessfully to do something with Folk/Yolk/Fork. This lead to the question, "Is Folk a kind of song, or a genre?"

    Comments?

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    Replies
    1. For what it's worth, Wikipedia says, "Folk music is a music genre..."

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  67. My initial post - Almost sounds like a puzzle better timed for next month - was a reference to the slate of college football playoff games that start in December.

    My subsequent post was a reference to Dallas Loss, working backwards from Sslad and Soil. Thanks for the shout outs Natasha, Jaws, Lego and WW!!

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  68. My clue was:
    "Oh maybe I can actually ostend my favorite example!"

    Marvin Gaye lived in Ostend, Belgium when he recorded "Sexual Healing", which I consider to be the greatest soul ballad ever.

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  69. BALLAD SOUL SALAD BOWL

    Gabba Gabba Hey!

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  70. When I wrote "Vote with your foot, or with Moby Dick," I was thinking of Vote --> BALLOT (sounds like BALLAD), foot --> SOLE, Moby Dick --> whale's tale --> whale's tail --> fluke (half of whale's tail) --> SOLE.

    Perhaps I should have been only a little less obscure and said something like "Vote with your (flat) foot, or with cousin of half of Moby Dick, I hear." (Vote would still point to ballot. The part of a foot that's flat is the sole, and half of Moby Dick would be half of whale's tail, that is, a fluke, which, in another meaning, is a cousin of a sole.)

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  71. As we awaited Blaine's arrival, I posted "Remove all".
    If you remove "all" from ballad, you're left with bad and soul. Speak of the devil!

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  72. I posted "Chattanooga Choo Choo" for Soul Train.

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    Replies
    1. I once stayed in that train hotel. I had a whole car to myself.

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    2. https://www.choochoo.com/blog/unique-hotels-in-chattanooga-tn-chattanooga-choo-choo

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    3. I am old enough to remember when UNIQUE didn't mean one of many just like it.

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    4. SDB: The train car was a real pullman car that used to function. I think that was unique. Unique has taken on a different meaning today. Have to check MR dict.

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  73. "Love Train" by the O'Jays, number 2 on the Billboard top twenty March, 1973. It was inspired the Market Frankford East line here in Philadelphia. It's Soul.

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