Sunday, February 06, 2022

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 6, 2022): A Game of Telephone

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 6, 2022): A Game of Telephone
Q: What language in seven letters can be spelled using the letters on three consecutives keys on a telephone? It's a language you would probably recognize, but not one that many people can speak.
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

Time to try Bing Translator

Edit: My original hint was to James Avery who played a Klingon on a couple episodes of Star Trek: Enterprise. After being deemed TMI, I posted about Bing Translator which has Klingon as one of its language options.
A: 4(GHI), 5(JKL), 6(MNO) --> KLINGON

205 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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    Replies
    1. Blaine, your self-obliterated clue made me smile. Now you know! ;-)

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  2. This one should be easy to clue. I actually have a connection to this puzzle, but specifying the type of connection may be TMI.

    Here’s my (first?) hint: Someone on this blog may get this answer sooner than others.

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  3. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Oops, I misinterpreted what your comment was saying.

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    2. I got here late today so maybe the Linux operating system vs language topic was already discussed and deleted. . .

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    3. All I said was that some authorities maintain that the language name involves 10 or 11 letters, not 7. Thanks, Blaine.

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  4. Remove the first letter and the last letter of the answer and you get a related term.

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    Replies
    1. Or, rearrange those remaining letters to get a term with which we are all familiar.

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    2. Interestinlgy, I see a few conservative figures in the wikipedia page of the term.

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  5. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  6. Replies
    1. There goes a clue of mine.
      pjbDoesn'tSpeakIt,ButFromWhatI'veHeardOfItItSoundsLike"Phlegmish"

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  7. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    2. Yes, you did, and that instantly gave me the answer. WAY TMI!!!

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    3. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    4. That changes nothing. The post is an instant giveaway no matter the wording.

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  8. Caught the answer almost immediately.

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    Replies
    1. Ben, Will mentioned your alternate answer.

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    2. And, jan, ICYMI, Will mentioned the Linux operating system vs. language issue from last week.

      Another language puzzle this week? Got it.

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  9. Its first speakers were in trouble.

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  10. ..."but not that many people can speak".

    Bahahahahahahahaha!!!

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  11. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    Replies
    1. So, I have the answer. It was actually very easy. I tried to write a clue, but realized my time line was way off.

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  12. Upon solving, I exclaimed a word in the language.

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  13. I have a legitimate answer, and there's a connection to the on-air puzzle. But based on comments here so far, I don't think I have the intended answer.

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  14. I think their system must be slow because I haven't gotten my return email.

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  16. Wondering how much static y'all will be giving WS.

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  17. Am I right in assuming that it's the keys that have to be consecutive and not the letters that are on them?

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  18. Got it. Now I should have some time to go down to the wharf for some fishing.

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  19. Before the answer sprang to mind, this one had me shrugging my shoulders and furrowing my brow. Tricky but tractable!

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  20. I got the answer immediately after reading Blaine’s clue

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    Replies
    1. I’m not the one to judge, since I’m married to someone who enjoys certain shows. So, my train of thought automatically diverts onto those side tracks

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    2. I kind of understand why you removed my comment, Blaine, so no worries. But your "I saw an episode..." comment led me *straight* to the answer. --Margaret G.

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    3. +1, Blaine... your clue tipped me off.

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    4. Stopping just short of TMI, IMO.

      About the image, though: "Italiana," really? 🤔

      "Portuguesa," then? "Española"? "Deutsche"? 😏

      Delete
  21. A rather conventional language. Also the subject of some good humor.

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  22. None of my phones have "keys." My cell phone has a touch pad, my push button phones have buttons, and my rotary phones had, well, whatever those are called. And you really can't spell with fewer than two numbers per letter. There was a scheme to use a first number for the 3 or 4 letter group, then a second number (1 to 4) to specify which letter in the group. So, have no "keys" and can't "spell." Got the answer anyways...

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Does anybody still have a phone with "keys"? I had to do it from memory myself. I'm sure most folks have just the numbers, no letters.
      pjbAgreesWithTheNamesakeOfMyYoungerBrotherOnThis

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  23. Hint: What Gomer Pyle would say!!!

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    Replies
    1. Gomer can speak it?!
      pjbDidn'tThinkFolksFromMayberryWouldKnowThisLanguage(OrSylacauga,Actually)

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  24. Got it! Now I can focus on todays crossword.

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  25. Has anybody received the email response from NPR?

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    Replies
    1. I put in my best guess that fits the clue even though I'm not certain the answer is 100% in line but I did get the email confirmation instantly just now

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  26. a first: I actually got blaine's clue even though I've never heard of the people involved

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  27. Almost makes me wish I knew who Uncle Phil was.

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  28. Replies
    1. No explanation on Thursday necessary for that one.
      pjbDoesn'tSpeakThisLanguage,ButHeSureUnderstandsThePunCAPJustProvided!(Ew!)

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  29. Jeannie's hubby presumably spoke it.

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  30. How about a 12-letter word, same phone key conditions, giving a reaction to this puzzle

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  31. I've got to go do some errands but, upon my return I will tell you about watching "Groundhog Day" for the first time last night. It's only 29 years after it was released (I was rather busy in 1993!). In short, I greatly enjoyed the dark and the light, the shadowing and foreshadowing...and both Phils.

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    1. I finally watched it for the first time a year ago. Did you notice that the way he got out of the loop was because he bought life insurance? :-)

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    2. Groundhog Day is an annual movie tradition for us

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    3. Curtis, I now see why. Some real gems in the film.

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    4. Todays's preamble from A.Word.A.Day with Anu Garg made me smile and cheer for both our wordshelves and our woodchucks/groundhogs:

      "I’m a minimalist, but I do make certain exceptions.

      One can never have too much chocolate in their pantry, too big a battery in their hone, or too many words on their wordshelves.

      Words don’t take much room. They don’t need feeding, vacuuming, washing, or tuning. No need buy insurance or locks.

      How many words does one really need in life? The more the merrier. You don’t have to use them all at the same time, but you never know which word might come handy when."

      You can see today's word here.

      It made me grin given JAWS' comment about "Groundhog Day" and insurance above; many, many actions by Phil Connors in "Groundhog Day;" and it is my dad's Groundhog-Day-adjacent/proximate birthday and he would have relished knowing this word.

      Enjoy!

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  32. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  33. I guess Blaine's clue was spot on.

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  34. The language is related to something which is similar to something that is related to the last puzzle.

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    Replies
    1. Klingon is used in Star Trek, which is similar to Star Wars, which is like wage war.

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  35. When I came up with the answer I smiled broadly.

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  36. my answer reminds me of a name that was all over the news, some years ago these days, when I was a little kid...

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    Replies
    1. We have the same answer. Do you think this is the answer that others are hinting at?

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  38. Blaine feom now I i wiil refer to you as beQ

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  39. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  40. I have a friend who claims to be fluent.

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  41. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    2. Unfortunately the language was not listed in the Harvard course catalog. Maybe if I cross registered at MIT...

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    3. Hey, I just realized that MIT is an anagram of TMI. Put that in your pipe and smoke it, Mr. Car Guy!

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    4. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    5. Jan, I guess you got your answer.

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    6. I couldn't find it at MIT, either. But Rosetta Stone has it.

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  42. Delete if this is giving it away but can this be an artificial/made up language? Not just an ethnic one?

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    1. Only half of all languages are Anatolian derivatives, and it at some point had to be created ex nihilo.

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    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  43. Finally figured it out. I feel free now!

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  44. Replies
    1. FWIW a prime factorization of the phone number
      2, 3*3,308137

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  45. Remove a letter and you’ll get berries that are good for your health.

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  46. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  47. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  48. I feel so adrift. I've sent my answer in three diferent times and still no return email. Damn!

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  49. I see that we seem to be keeping the blog administrator particularly busy today. Naturally I take exception to my deletion. I don't see how things personal to me - my first car, date, kiss, whatever - could be known by anyone in this forum. Come Thursday afternoon, I'll be looking for some 'splainin!

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  50. This connects to a puzzle from a few weeks ago.

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  51. A lot of comments have been removed from this space.

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  52. The subject of today's Final Jeopardy! described himself as a beer-swilling high school dropout whose biggest mistake was quitting school at 17. “I should have done it when I was 12,” he said.

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    Replies
    1. I just read about his life. Very interesting. Tks.

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  53. Can we all agree that the answer is probably not Logopandecteision?

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  54. Replies
    1. I found a first answer, quickly, in five letters. 

      But then I actually READ the instructions and found one single seven-letter answer that is CLEARLY the choice of greater Blainesville.  And then I stopped looking, as stopping was the logical thing to do.

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    2. Ben, Are you the kind of quitter who stops looking once you find your cell phone???

      :indignantthingy

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    3. I am!
      And, just my luck, it's always the last place I look.

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    4. I know this might sound intuitive, but I've found that when I can't find my cell phone, if I look in the last place first it can help.

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  55. I did actually READ them. Two answers fit.

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  56. I have two, seven letter languages.

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    1. I found three; one new world, one old world, and another, a language that the old-world language is based upon. Only one other blogger has hinted toward agreeing with any of my guesses so I'm delaying submission until I check 3,734 more entries in my database.

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  57. If you dial this number you get a termite eradication company.

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  58. Question: may I scramble the letters on the adjacent keys? Or do the letters in the answer stay in their order on the key?

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    1. Take 3 consecutive numbers (say 7, 8, 9). The corresponding letters are P(Q)RS, TUV, WXY(Z). The answer would have to only use those letters (with repeats as necessary).

      Delete
    2. That is what I assume, too.
      Along with, of course, the fact that it is the one of the silliest, most STRAP-violating and clumsy letter rearranging puzzles ever.
      Helps to explain the paroxysm of TMI.

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    3. Sorry, but I don't know what you mean by STRAP-violating. I did a quick online search, and none of the answers made sense. It can wait until Thursday if needed.

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    4. Again, again, again. . .we need eco, eco, eco to explain STRAP, STRAP, STRAP. . .

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    5. Society To Repudiate Anagram Puzzles. Goes back six years.

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    6. (But what would the Society To Repudiate Acronym Puns call itself?)

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    7. Thank you. I did not consider this puzzle to be an anagram puzzle, but rather a puzzle that uses a limited set of letters from the alphabet.

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    8. Do TUV, XYZ, and OPERATOR count? That would increase possibilities ...

      Delete
  59. Thank you, Blaine, for enriching our puzzling fun. I appreciate you!

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  60. If you need to phone a friend on this one who may be able to help, the numbers you’ll need are 2, 5, 6 & 7 (i won’t provide the order or frequency, since that may be too helpful!)

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  61. Check this out: Y'all know that 8675309 is a prime number?

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    Replies
    1. Who can I turn to, as I referenced in a prior post?

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    2. Sure, sure. But 2 will always be my favorite prime number!

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    3. WW: "You can't do it unless the number is 2."
      --Ray Magliozzi

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    4. 2 is certainly the oddest prime number.

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  62. Seeing the puzzle for the first time today after a busy weekend.

    A guest lecturer for a sociolinguistics course I took as an undergrad would go on to get his PhD and become linguist-famous for his acquisition study in this language. I’ll post a story or two about it after Thursday afternoon.

    I recommend using this language’s alphabet to identify COVID variants after we’ve exhausted Greek.

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    Replies
    1. https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1229808/Linguist-reveals-I-spoke-Klingon-son-years.html

      http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2012/08/a-man-once-tried-to-raise-his-son-as-a-native-speaker-in-klingon/

      Delete
  63. This comment has been posted by the author.

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    1. As far as I am concerned, you have just won this blog.

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  64. A regular expression dictionary makes this trivial.

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  65. As a loyal member of STRAP, I reiterate that we miss you EcoArchitect.

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  66. After removing a strange language you’ll have currency.

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  67. Replies
    1. "I've got to go do some errands but, upon my return I will tell you about watching "Groundhog Day" for the first time last night. It's only 29 years after it was released (I was rather busy in 1993!). In short, I greatly enjoyed the dark and the light, the shadowing and foreshadowing...and both Phils." >>> "Errand of Mercy" is the 26th episode of the first season of the American science fiction television series Star Trek.

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  68. KLINGON, using the 4,5,6 keys.

    I had said, "Now I should have some time to go down to the wharf for some fishing."

    This was a somewhat obvious reference to Worf, arguably the best known Klingon in the Star Trek franchise.

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  69. Klingon

    My Hint:
    "I guess Blaine's clue was spot on." Damn Spellcheck! I meant to type, "I guess Blaine's clue was Spok on."

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  70. KLINGON

    My “connection to this puzzle” is that William Shatner and I attended the same university, albeit years apart and in different schools. If I had specified the academic connection, it might have been TMI, and as some noted, there were quite a few TMIs removed this week.

    The “[s]omeone on this blog [who] may get this answer sooner than others” is Word Woman, who recently submitted the answer “Frankfort, Kentucky” and “Trek.”

    And piggybacking on Rob’s hint, the anagram “lingo,” the additional anagram is “login.”

    In the interest of equal time to eco’s STRAP—perhaps our own version of the Fairness Doctrine (Jan notwithstanding)?—do we need SNAP, Society to Nurture Anagram Puzzles?

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  71. KLINGON

    My clues:

    Not Babbel.
    That's right, Babbel doesn't offer Klingon. But: Duolingo does!

    Shakespeare.
    In Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country, a dinner is held in honor of Gorkon, the Chancellor of the Klingon High Council. Gorkon makes a toast that includes this line: "You haven't heard Shakespeare until you've heard it in the original Klingon." (An oblique reference to an obscure item of Nazi propaganda, according to which Shakespeare was actually German.)

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  72. KLINGON. My hint was, “Jeannie's hubby presumably spoke it.” Michael Ansara, first husband of Barbara Eden of “I Dream of Jeannie,” played the Klingon commander Kang in several appearances in Star Trek TV episodes and films.

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  73. KLINGON

    > Again, bigly!

    This time, Will devoted the entire New York Times Sunday Crossword to the NPR WESUN Puzzle topic, pretty much. Tell me that's just a coincidence!

    > All I said was that some authorities maintain that the language name involves 10 or 11 letters, not 7.
    > No trouble at all.

    In "The Trouble With Tribbles" (TOS, S2E15), the drunk Klingon who picks a bar fight with Scotty and Chekhov disses the Enterprise and says, "The whole quadrant knows it. That's why they're learning to speak Klingonese." Some bigger nerds than I claim he said "Klingonee", or that he was referring to another Klingon language called Klingonaase. (That last reminds me of Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle: “Man told me,” he said, “that these here elevators was Mayan architecture. I never knew that till today. And I says to him, ‘What’s that make me -- mayonnaise?")

    > Sorry if so, but is identifying as a nerd TMI? [Deleted!]

    Please explain, Blaine.

    > I couldn't find it at MIT, either. But Rosetta Stone has it.

    Take it from Worf!

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    Replies
    1. There were two guys in my house at Harvard that had pretty much memorized the entire (original) script cannon, and would challenge each other reciting lines during reruns. To my knowledge, neither were fluent in Klingon. I guess that would have just been too nerdy - hence the reference to MIT (sorry Beavers).

      Delete
    2. Very understandable. Going to Harvard, what else would they have to do? LOL

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    3. Canon to right of them,
      Canon to left of them,
      Canon in front of them....

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    4. No, they were firing those lines.

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    5. Those two guys in your house at Harvard would have found themselves in hot water in my dorm at Stony Brook. Our suite, and the one next door, were all together on evening, watching "Amok Time" (TOS, S2E1). My girlfriend was being obnoxious, reciting lines during the show like your friends. After a while, we implored her to shut up, threatening to throw her into the shower if she didn't. She behaved until the very end, when she couldn't help blurting out, "In a pig's eye!" We threw her in the shower, of course.

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  74. I wrote "If you dial this number you get a termite eradication company." Since we had already had too many TMI hints referring to Star Trek, I thought it was safer to take a step back and refer to "Galaxy Quest" instead, where Sarris is, if not a Klingon, at least as aggressive as one (and even weirder looking). Sarris was determined to annihilate the Thermians, whom Jason Naismith (the Tim Allen character) refers to as "Termites" at one point. And the area code? GQ1--couldn't think of anything better.

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  75. Klingon. I got this very easily, and Blaine's clue confirmed it. I know very little about Star Trek, and realized after my first comment about ancestors, that it all is very futuristic.

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  76. Klingon. Blaine's name in Klingon is beQ

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  77. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  78. My comment that "I was reminded of my first set of blueprints" was strangely deemed TMI. Now if I had added how the foundation drawings were rather thin...

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  79. My mention of a relation to a recent puzzls, was "Jenny, Kenny & Lenny", which is key #5 and contains the first two letters of the answer. I liked the 8675309 prime directive, and turned it back to Jenny, Jenny, who can I turn to. I resisted my urge to mention a universal language as possibly TMI.

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  80. Linguist d'Armond Speers spoke only Klingon to his son for the first three years of his son's life. d'Armond's wife spoke only English to their son and by about age five, the son stopped responding to/in Klingon.

    d'Armond started the experiment in 1996, so I would've been a senior in college entering my first year of grad school. (I did not pursue linguistics past a master's degree.) I didn't know d'Armond beyond that one time he guest-lectured in one of my courses, but I remember hearing about his experiment around the time it began.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1229808/Linguist-reveals-I-spoke-Klingon-son-years.html

    http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2012/08/a-man-once-tried-to-raise-his-son-as-a-native-speaker-in-klingon/

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  81. Klingon

    My post, ending in BANG, was a reference to last word in the theme song of The Big Bang Theory.

    There are references to Klingon in multiple episodes, including one in which Sheldon recites the Klingon proverb, “bortaS bIr jablu'DI' reH QaQqu' nay,” (Revenge is a dish best served cold.)

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    Replies
    1. Klingon Boggle is apparently not a real game.

      Delete
  82. On Sunday I posted "I have a legitimate answer, and there's a connection to the on-air puzzle. But based on comments here so far, I don't think I have the intended answer." My answer was Lomongo, a Bantu (Will's example in the on-air puzzle) language spoken by several of the Mongo peoples in central Democratic Republic of the Congo. Of course, I realize most people haven't heard of that language. When I finally came up with Klingon, I posted that I feel free, a reference to Cling Free.

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  83. I don't think anyone hinted: Jamie Farr who is best known for playing the cross-dressing corporal Maxwell Q. Klinger in the CBS television sitcom M*A*S*H.

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  84. I checked 7861 languages from the present and past, (but overlooked the future. My results include;
    Chibcha Indigenous Colombian Extinct 2,3,4
    Mongoli Central Asian Living 4,5,6
    Mogholi Precursor to Mongoli Living 4,5,6
    Gedaged New Guinea Living 2,3,4
    Minokok Malaysia Living 4,5,6

    Before you say, Wait, Mister Re. It's Mongol (or Mongolian,)" learn this. The Mongols from Mongolia call their language Mongoli same as Parisians say "Francais." Look it up.

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    Replies
    1. Wow, you really did that research JUST for this puzzle?
      Every now and then I dabble in Finnish (Suomi), as did J.R R. Tolkien, but in his case with more fruitful results. He wanted to read the Kalevala.

      Delete
    2. Nice list of non-fictitious languages that qualify, only you missed one: TUMPOON (8867666) is the spelling of Tampuan, the language of Tampuan people indigenous to the mountainous regions of Ratanakiri Province in Cambodia, listed on Wikipedia's list of language names.

      Delete
  85. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  86. I got the answer early on, but I had trouble emailing it in (no response email). But I STUCK TO IT and mailed it in Wednesday. Finally npr responded.
    Oh yeah, the answer: Klingon.

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  87. I am not sure if I would feel differently if I solved this; I got as far as Vulcan.
    Anyway, IMHO, it is among the very lame Sunday Puzzles.

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  88. We upload a special Valentine's Day edition of Puzzleria! tonight, just after Midnight PST. Our friend Mathew Huffman chimes in with a trio of "Heartbeatable Conundrums" in his "Conundrum Set" feature. They are titled “Social comedia,” “Warm all over,” and “Kudos, Cupid!”
    Also on our menus this week are:
    * a Schpuzzle of the Week titled "A dozen roses, a dozen dates,"
    * an Onomatopoeic and Gridirony Super Bowlful Puzzle Slice about football equipment,
    * an LVI Dessert titled "Ovine, feline, feminine thespian,
    * a second Dessert titled "Lima, koala, albacore, Cairo, Burma," and
    * ten NPR riff-offs titled “Trekfones and Klingon lingo (toy’wI’ tlhInganpu’).”
    Come join us for some hearty puzzle fun... you'll love it!

    LegoSendingAVulcanValentineYourWay

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  89. Phone pad 3-key words reacting to this puzzle:

    345: FIDDLEDEEDEE
    or
    678: UNMONOTONOUS

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  90. KLINGON
    Heard of it, cannot speak a word of it, don't want to speak it.
    pjbLuckyHeDidn'tHaveToConsultALongListForThisOne!

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  91. Klingon

    Last Sunday I said, “When I came up with the answer I smiled broadly.” I.e., I beamed – as in beam me up, Scottie. Sorry I’m so late posting this – I was out all day.

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  92. My hint: “Its first speakers were in trouble.”
    The first episode in which the language was spoken was “The Trouble with Tribbles”.
    To Mort Canard’s “wry smirk” I added that “Winter Games Smirk” was more seasonal. “Games smirk” rhymes with “James Kirk” (I added the “Winter” to hide it a little).

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  93. My blogs -

    If you need to phone a friend on this one who may be able to help, the numbers you’ll need are 2, 5, 6 & 7 (i won’t provide the order or frequency, since that may be too helpful!) - - The number to call for Mr Spock is 677-7625.

    A rather conventional language. Also the subject of some good humor. - This referred to Star Trek conventions and the multitude of (dad?) jokes about Klingons.

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  94. It seems I'm not the only one who noticed (and doesn't appreciate) that Mayim Bialik suddenly decided to call the first round of the game show "Single Jeopardy". I can't even say what's wrong about it (other than being a needless back-formation). But it is wrong.

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    Replies
    1. From the look on her face earlier in the week, she either swallowed one whole or doesn't think gar is a good name for a fish.
      Except for stupid answer categories, Alex Trebeck very seldom if ever insulted the staff.
      Quits or gets the boot sooner than later.

      Delete
  95. I thought Blaine was referring to this clue:
    "Klingons were featured in a rare episode of "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air" where Carlton accidentally creates a warp drive. A fierce battle ensues between the Klingons of Varg'thruk and Jeffery over proper hip hop slang. Jeffrey wins; Carlton confesses his love for bacon." mirror.uncyc.org/wiki/Klingon

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