Sunday, March 13, 2022

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Mar 13, 2022): A Walk in the Park

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Mar 13, 2022): A Walk in the Park
Q: Think of two four-letter words that complete the phrase "___ in the ___." Move the first letter of the second word to the start of the first word. You'll get two synonyms. What are they?
I thought it would be easy to complete the phrase, but after looking through every list I can think of... oh wait, I have it.

Edit: Hints: 'complete' and 'every' are synonyms for 'whole' and 'all'.
A: HOLE in the WALL --> WHOLE, ALL

181 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. Replies
    1. I thought it would be a walk in the park. But it became a pain in the neck. I thought I'd be searching until I was blue in the face. At the fork in the road, I drew a line in the sand, took a shot in the dark and finally got a foot in the door. You know what they say about a bird in the hand.

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    2. I'll bet you feel better having gotten that out of your system!

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    3. Should you realy be doing that with a broken wrist?

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    4. As I noted in my update to last week's puzzle, it turns out my wrist isn't actually broken. They took new X-rays and there is no fracture.

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    5. Did you mean "what in the hail"?

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    6. Cute, ron, but it doesn't ring in the ears. You can argue until you're blue in the face, but I'm not a babe in the wood. If that's the answer, Will's sick in the head; it's a slap in the face.

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  3. I think I have it, but there might be a "synonym" controversy looming ahead. The words are synonym-ish.

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    1. The definition of either word contains the other in my dictionary. And they are listed in my thesaurus as synonyms. Maybe we have different answers.

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    2. Could be. It's just not easy to construct a sentence in which my two words are smoothly interchangeable. By the way, great riff above!

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    3. Yeah, I agree Lancek.
      In the huge majority of occasions of use, if you try to substitute you don't even get a grammatical sentence.
      But I'm pretty sure this is the intended answer, the one that (I presume) we both have. (And almost sure Blaine has this one too, and a couple of the other clues are clearly hinting at it too.)

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  4. Remove the last letter from each of the four-letter words. Rearrange. You get a word making something special.

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    1. The four letters only? Like Gold?

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    2. Oh, yes. The total of eight letters, minus the end letter of each word, for an anagramable six letters; "in the" is not included.

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  5. Got it pretty quickly; mission complete!

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    1. No fun. Got it before he repeated it. Didn't even get to the movies.

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  6. Another literary clue: _A Midsummer Night's Dream_.

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    Replies
    1. Great clue, but no fair peeking at the script!

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    2. And another comedy that features a character with the same name.

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    3. I S, off the subject, but, since you mentioned it last week, I've kept plugging at Semantle. Good mental exercise, I guess, but the target words can be really elusive.

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    4. Semantle is an excellent way to lose your entire mind!

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    5. That is one of the possibilities that crossed my. . . er. . you know.

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  7. Three movies come to mind (two of which I've seen).

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  8. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  9. Make that, "Great arguments have been and are being made concerning one of the 4-letter words."

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  10. I solved this one in the middle of having my breakfast.

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  11. Kwason as an acceptable alternative makes me weep for hundreds of much better ones over the years.

    With time being out of whack, I had just extra enough to solve this in bed.
    Speaking of which, Ben Franklin had many, many better ideas. I support year 'round Standard Time. Consensus here?

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    1. As I have said here before, I would very much like for DLST to be permanent. I was born in neither Standard nor Daylight Saving Time.

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    2. Sure, flying kites in thunderstorms is brilliant. Makes losing an hour's sleep once a year look like nothing!

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    3. DST makes as much sense as cutting 6 inches from the top of a blanket and sewing the piece onto the bottom to keep your toes warm.

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    4. Love your analogy, SuperZee! Let's hold on to the waning evening light as long as we can, all year round.

      LegoWhoSuggestsThatAllThisSpringingForwardAndFallingBackIsBadForTheBody(AndPerhapsTheSoulToo)

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    5. SDB: I'm curious as to how you were born in neither Standard nor Daylight Saving Time. Were you born in one of those weird time zones that are half and hour off of their neighbors?

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    6. EWF:
      It is a puzzle you should be able to figure out. Here is a clue. I was born in April 1945 in Seattle.

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    7. The U.S. Senate on Tuesday passed legislation that would make daylight saving time permanent. So, looking at a map, Worldle fans, the whole country is (as usual, politics fans) moving to the right.

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    8. During World War II, President Franklin Roosevelt instituted year-round Daylight Saving Time, called "War Time," from February 9, 1942 to September 30, 1945.

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    9. I knew your reference when you posted.
      There is a book I enjoyed "Two o'clock eastern wartime: a novel" by John Dunning who often writes about book sellers.
      The capitalization in the title is correct, BTW.

      My local library has a copy, but there is strange lack of information searching for it on line.

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    10. I'm enough of a science geek to wonder how we're going to explain to all future generations of school kids that because of the rotation of the earth, the sun appears to move across the sky and always reaches its peak at . . . 1:00 p.m.?

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    11. Not to worry. Most teachers cannot explain how the International Date Line works.

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    12. The International Date Line? "Russian brides are standing by"? Who's staffing the phones these days?

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  12. After trying everything, including "Pain in the Siberia", I realized I had already gotten it.

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  13. Cruising after church in my crimson Mustang makes me feel like a new man. In Ohio we’re experiencing a minor heat wave. It’s not helping me out on the puzzle, but my mindset definitely is refreshed.

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  14. I learned there is a literal meaning between USA vs. British types.

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  15. Once again, it just came to me.
    pjbSaysNoCluesHere,Y'allAreOnYourOwn

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  16. So, my understanding is you will end up with a new 5 letter word that is a synonym of a new 3 letter word. Is that correct?

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. Yeah. There are two original 4-letter words.

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    3. You're looking for 2 words, abcd and efgh, such that eabcd and fgh are synonyms.

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    4. You just gave the answer in Ubykh. https://academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/User:Thefamouseccles

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    5. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  17. After many windows opened and discarded it finally came to me without using the Internet, for once.

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  18. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    1. I deleted my comment before I saw your reply. I was concerned I might have posted TMI without even realizing it. I guess not.

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  19. My friend offered to take me to breakfast this morning, but I suggested we go Dutch...

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  20. I just got it! It may have helped that I put down the phone and looked out at the ocean instead.

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  21. That's how it usually works for me too. The answers come out of the ether.

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  22. Replies
    1. The song Take It Off by Ke$ha contains the lines "It's a hole in the wall, it's a dirty free for all."

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    2. I Googled Ke$ha lyric "in the" and immediately was presented with the answer.

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  23. A farmers night mare: nail in the shoe.

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    Replies
    1. A fishing trip straggler: Last in the boat.
      A musclebound man behind bars: Hunk in the cage.
      Get in big trouble in the Navy: Land in the brig.
      A woman where the baby should be: Lass in the crib.
      pjbHopesAllHisPostsGetReadInTheBlog

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    2. Someone here knows how to write Cryptics.

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    3. Thanks for the high praise, PS.
      pjbSaysLookForACrypticComingSoonToAPuzzleria!NearYou

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  24. Any chance pride and ark are synonyms? Or perhaps "pego" might be a word for a place - just as nice of a place in which to ride your bike as a park?

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  25. Replies
    1. Thank you for giving me the answer. It has been so many years since I was at university I forgot about that expression and it all came together

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    2. I can think of one ___in the __ that would fit this clue. But it would be very distasteful.

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  26. I usually think the puzzles are easy if I solve them while in bed, but not this one. Maybe that's because It was after midnight.

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  27. Happy Pi Day, everyone! Today we commemorate the special number that is the ratio of the perimeter of every circle to the length of the segment that is its diameter. Write a name associated with this ratio in upper case, add a circle, remove a segment, and rearrange the result to get three words for something else we commemorate this week. What is the name, and what are the three words? (I suggested this one to NPR, but they passed.)

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    Replies
    1. Oh nice!
      I took a stab at it, and... I have found it!

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    2. HEB had pizzas for $3.14 with a coupon today. Also $3.14 off of Key Lime and Peach pies. I love pi day.

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    3. Unfortunately it is Lent so i had to stick some in the freezer.

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    4. Thursday answer time. The name is ARCHIMEDES. If you add an O and subtract the bottom segment on one of the Es, you can rearrange the result to spell IDES OF MARCH.

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    5. I said "I took a stab at it" because, well, obviously, there is a stabbing closely associated with the Ides of March. And I said "I have found it!" because that's Archimedes' famous "Eureka!"

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  28. I spent a day working this puzzle before I realized I'd misread it and was trying to move the wrong letter. Fifteen seconds later...

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  29. Yet again, I have spent forever on this puzzle and am still emptyhanded.

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  30. Residents, past and present, of a certain New England town will smile when they solve this puzzle. I did.

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  31. I was going to pass on this week’s puzzle because I was exhausted from cleaning up all the arboreal debris from the storm with accompanying dangerously high winds a couple of days ago--I actually watched the persimmon tree in front of the house sway from the base of the trunk and held my breath--but today I feel like a new man, so I’m going to give it everything I’ve got.

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  32. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    1. Happy Pi Day, all!
      Let me second the Pi Day greetings Lancek posted early this morning. (Also, kudos to Lancek on composing an excellent Pi Day puzzle.)
      I have just solved Tyler Hinman's fine "BLANK in the BLANK" NPR puzzle. And if I have been able to solve it, that means all other Blainesvillians have also been able to solve it!
      I suspect you are all hankering for another puzzle...
      So, here is the current Schpuzzle of the Week over on Puzzleria!:
      This week’s Schpuzzle of the Week involves Pi Day, which we celebrate today, March 14, commonly written as 3/14 (3-1-4 are the first three digits of pi).
      But why might Hall-of-Fame ballplayers Brooks Robinson, Mike Schmidt and George Brett wait until October 1 to celebrate Pi Day?

      You may post hints but please do not reveal your answers before noon on Wednesday PDT. That is when we reveal all our answers on Puzzleria!

      LegoWhoProvidesThisLinkForThoseWhoWantToSeeImagesOfBrooksMike&George

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  33. I hope this is not TMI: anyone who loves boating north of Desolation Sound, in B.C. (as I did for many years) will soon get the answer.

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    1. I was a sailor, not a power boater, if that helps.

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    2. Hole in the Wall is an narrow channel, constrained by rapids at its western entrance (thus making a sailboat more limited in times to traverse it) that leads from Okisollo Channel to Calm Channel, just north of the main part of Desolation Sound, in B.C.

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  34. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  35. This puzzle brings Austin TX to mind. We got the answer in about an hour. I was floundering and my spouse began writing every 4-word "in the" phrase he could think of. He had it in 10 minutes.

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  36. my usual search methods crapped out completely. so we went for a 2 hour hike at the intersection of the Ruth Kees big tree trail and the swamp trail an idea came to me. but I thought I had to have two sets of matching synonyms.re-reading the puzz. I sent in a plausible answer. not that it matters, I never carry my phone with me

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    Replies
    1. Is that(Ruth Kees) close to Rattlesnake mountain/ lake? Never been there.

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    2. Tiger Mtn, closer to Issq

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  37. Anymore clues? I am coming up with nothing even with the clues of Midsummers Night Dream, Cobain, Sail boating, and a New England Town.

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    1. The clues are not supposed to help you solve the puzzle, but to show that we have to others who also have solved. Please read the Standard Reminder above.

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    2. E H Harriman of the Union Pacific Railroad

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    3. This is a tough one to clue without breaking the rules. But rules are made to be broken and even to give a half clue would probably be too much.But a third might work.

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    4. I come here for clues and inspiration for when the answer alludes me but those TMIs are removed so quickly! 😁

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    5. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  38. There are rumors Putin believes many in his army have Covid 19, which explains why they have lost their taste for battle.

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    1. Yeah, but, they still smell.

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    2. Yes, but the stink comes from the top. Have you ever noticed that Putin, if you switch the syllables, be comes Tinpoo?

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    3. Isn’t a Poo Tin is where you put the bags after cleaning up after your dog.

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    4. I don't have a dog, but everyone else in Seattle does, and they leave their little gifts in my garbage container when they are too heavy for them to carry back to their Putin.

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    5. At least they're putting the bags in trash container. There is someone, as yet unknown, who leaves his dog's bagged gifts on a local park's trails.

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    6. Perhaps you should send in-Put to Ronco. Pu-Tins would sell faster than oligarch's yachts. Put-in your poo and worthless Rub(b)le.

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    7. I have seen them left on park trails here too a couple of times. What I am now doing is saving them in a back yard plastic storage bin and will offer them to the kids on Halloween.

      The mega-yachts will not be sold. They will be tied up in courts for many years.

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    8. Better they tie them up at some dock.

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    9. Well that is exactly what happens when they are seized. Then all the crooked lawyers get involved and they cannot be sold for years as they "proceed" through the courts.

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    10. Exactly why the FOV are trying to sell them before they're seized. If you hurry, you might be able to get a good deal on one.

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    11. I already put a down payment on a huge one. I don't understand why the offer was in my spam folder though. I can't wait to get it.

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  39. Cui bono?
    Oil companies and the golf industry love Daylight Saving Time and lobby heavily for it.
    Can you think of others?

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  40. I really enjoy puzzles that make me go THAT'S NICE when I finally solve them. (Reference: Mrs Brown's Boys)

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  41. OK, this proves it:

    World War I began 7/28/1914
    7 + 28 + 19 + 14 = 68

    World War II began 9/1/1939
    9 + 1 + 19 + 39 = 68

    Invasion of Ukraine began 2/24/2022
    2 + 24 + 20 + 22 = 68

    Any questions?

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    1. Are you always this optimistic?

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    2. jan:
      June is a 6 and not a 7.
      WWII began Sept. 3 not 1.

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    3. Nope. WWI began July 28. WWII began September 1. Just ask Wikipedia.

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    4. Timeline of World War I | Britannica
      https://www.britannica.com › List › World History
      World War I begins when Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia. August 1–28, 1914. Germany declares war on Russia, France, and Belgium.

      OR

      Witness the beginning of World War I with the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand on June 28, 1914
      Overview of the start of World War I, including details of the June 28, 1914, assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.

      Wikipedia is NOT a reliable source.

      Also from Britannica:

      Great Britain and France declared war on Germany on September 3, 1939 at 11:00 am and at 5:00 pm, respectively. World War II had begun.

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  42. Music Clue: Marshall Tucker Band

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  43. Ugh! After not thinking of the correct phrase for a few days, I took to slogging through a list of 4-letter words for inspiration. I did finally get it, but this one was a pain in the neck!

    The only good news is that now I have a bunch of "in the" phrases, and one or two of them might turn into a puzzle.

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  44. Replies
    1. Farmers were always against DLS time, and still are, because they have to get up when the cows get up. I never heard of anyone ever saying farmers like DLS. The article is incorrect too in saying Washington State has introduced legislation to get rid of it. This is nonsense. Washington, Oregon and California all introduced legislation to make it permanent, but we have to wait for Congress to approve it. Back a hundred years ago farmers were a majority, but now they are a minority.

      Another thing that bothers me is why if they are going to approve it that we must wait until next year. FDR implemented it immediately in 1942 to save fuel in the war effort. So why can't it begin this year? If there is a good reason, I would like to hear what it is.

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  45. “Damon; Do te know... that a talpa on the neck means you’ll be wealthy?”
    L. J. Smith; The Vampire Diaries; 1991-2014.

    Mole, mole, mole, or mole?!

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  46. No good arguments for "Saving Time" that I can see.
    Sleep science says it is dangerous.
    The Senate only debated about the changes, not which one to use year round. Hope the House and Pres have better sense.
    I like such concepts as meridian, zenith, noon etc.
    We now have DST for eight months and three before the Summer Solstice.
    Time, so to speak, to drop the silly idea.

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    Replies
    1. As you noted, we are already on DST for a majority of the year. Why not just keep it there?

      Time is an illusion. Lunchtime doubly so. - Ford Prefect

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  47. I posted this Puzzleria! Pi Day puzzle posted at Mon Mar 14, 03:04:00 PM PDT:
    This week’s Schpuzzle of the Week involves Pi Day, which we celebrate today, March 14, commonly written as 3/14 (3-1-4 are the first three digits of pi).
    But why might Hall-of-Fame ballplayers Brooks Robinson, Mike Schmidt and George Brett wait until October 1 to celebrate Pi Day?

    Tha answer: is:
    Robinson, Schmidt and Brett are still-living Major League Baseball Hall of Famers who played "3RD BASE." The first four digits of pi written in "BASE 3" notation are 1-0-0-1. Those four digits, when written as a date, are 10/01, or October 1.

    LegoWhoObservesThatPieTraynorWasAlsoAHallOfFamerWhoPatrolledBase3!

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  48. Blaine
    Thanks so much for always coming up with great clues and Answers!!!

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  49. Puzzleria! is celebrating an anniversary of sorts this week... We are publishing the 25th Cryptic Crossword Puzzle created for our blog by our friend Patrick J. Berry (screen name, cranberry) over a span of five years.
    Here is Patrick's first Cryptic Crossword on P!, published five years ago. (Patrick has also created several NPR-style puzzles for Puzzleria!)
    We upload Puzzleria! tonight, just after Midnight PDT.
    Our menus this week also feature:
    * a Schpuzzle of the Week about golden boys, golden men and golden ages,
    * a Slice of Puzzle that is topped with "Argumentative anagramming,"
    * a Surf ‘n’ Turf Dessert, and
    * a dozen riff-off of this week's NPR puzzles (three created by our friend Ecoarchitect) titled "Hidin’ out at the “Hole (in the Wall)” with Sundance & Butch."
    Come celebrate with us!

    LogoWhoObservesThatIfSupermanHailsFromKryptonThenPatrickJBerryMustHailFrom"Crypton"

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    Replies
    1. HOLE IN THE WALL, WHOLE, ALL
      pjbThanksLego(OrLogo,AsItSaysInHisSignoff)ForTheTeaser(Puzzleria!ShouldBeReadyTonightAt2:00amMyTime)

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  50. HOLE IN THE WALLWHOLE = ALL

    I used the Merriam-Webster “in the” list which quickly provided the answer...

    A Hole in the Wall restaurant.

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    Replies
    1. Man, I wish I had known about that list!

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    2. I had no idea, and looked, but couldn't find, a list like that. I wanted one because I was having no joy with this puzzle until after I went to bed Sunday evening. I solved it then by more thinking about the letters that might be involved. So, it is more satisfying the way I finally solved it, but also more frustrating.

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  51. HOLE IN THE WALL—>WHOLE + ALL

    My comment, the bulk of which—the storm and winds, the trees, the debris—was true, had several buried hints (at least I hoped that they were sufficiently buried to avoid removal by Blaine): “PASS” alluded to the Hole-in-the-Wall Pass in Johnson County, Wyoming, which was the home of the Hole-in-the-Wall Gang, including Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. “NEW MAN” was a reference to Paul Newman, who played Butch Cassidy in the film, and “I’LL GIVE IT EVERYTHING I’VE GOT” was another way of saying, “I’ll give it my ALL,” one of the solutions.

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  52. HOLE IN THE WALL >>> WHOLE & ALL

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  53. Hole in the wall --> whole, all

    Last Sunday I said, “Great arguments have been and are being made concerning one of the 4-letter words.” Of course, I was referring to the political disagreements concerning a wall along our southern border with Mexico.

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  54. Hole in the Wall; Whole/All

    This puzzle made me smile. From 1980 to 1993 my family lived in East Lyme, Connecticut. Access to the town beach was by via a tunnel under a stone railway trestle. The beach was known as, Hole in the Wall.

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  55. PaulSun Mar 13, 06:03:00 AM PDT
    I posted my hint a week ago.

    PaulSun Mar 06, 04:21:00 AM PST
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w9KBOhPXhds

    Another movie hint:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ABpeLNCuE3w

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  56. I wrote, “Remove the last letter from each of the four-letter words. Rearrange. You get a word making something special.” That’s “hallow.”

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  57. HOLE IN THE WALL -> WHOLE, ALL

    > Many images of the answer this week.

    Too many pictures of wall with holes in them from Ukraine.

    > Three movies come to mind (two of which I've seen).

    The Three Outlaws, Cat Ballou, and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid all involved the Hole-in-the-Wall gang.

    > Erewhon.

    A hole-in-the-wall is a real nowhere.

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  58. HOLE IN THE WALL - WHOLE, ALL

    I didn't get the Singing in the Rain reference until I looked up the story behind Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. Maybe I should watch that movie again. It's been a long time.

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  59. HOLE IN THE WALL=> WHOLE, ALL. My hint said that the answer came to me without an Internet search “after many windows opened and discarded.” A window is, literally, a “hole in the wall."

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  60. HOLE IN THE WALL
    Whole/all

    In Britain, they refer to a "Hole in the wall" as an ATM machine.

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  61. hole in the wall (whole, all)

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  62. My hint was "Hey Gang" referring to the Hole in the Wall Gang from Butch Cassidy.

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    Replies
    1. Your comment sent me searching the internet for more about them and led me to a fascinating, not to mention poignant, account of their last years: https://www.thedailybeast.com/butch-cassidy-and-the-sundance-kids-last-tango.

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  63. Hole in the wall -- whole, all

    I said I stopped looking at the phone, and looked out at the ocean. That was an attempt at a reference to looking at the big picture (or the "whole," in "all" of its entirety).

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  64. My blog:

    “I solved this one in the middle of having my breakfast” - my breakfast included a bagel and donut, each with a “hole” in the middle.

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  65. My answer: HOLE in the WALL ==> WHOLE & ALL

    And now, two colorful, possible alternate answers:

    If I'm feeling less than 100%, I might say that I... AIN'T in the PINK ==> PAINT & INK
    Or if I pull some gray clothing out of the dryer, I might find a little... LINT in the GRAY ==> GLINT & RAY

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    Replies
    1. Creative alternatives, Enya_and_WeirdAl_fan, but I fear the Puzzlemaster "ain't" gonna bite!

      LegoWhoPrefersPinkElephantsToGrayElephants

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    2. Whole -All. Clue: Lent is a Holy time.

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  66. Well, this was my week to be defeated by the puzzle.

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    Replies
    1. Cap, you may want to make note of Ron's post above. I played around with the Merriam Webster site, and I'm filing that away for future reference. They have lists of "in the", "of the", etc.

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  67. to my mind somewhat less satisfying to have the answer just pop into your head than to have an algorithm that inexorably grinds out the solution. time to put puzz aside and start the inexorable tax grind

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  68. Hole in the Wall, Whole/All. Not much in the way of a hint but "mission complete" was a reference to "complete" being somewhat of a synonym for "whole."

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  69. When Dr. Awkward brought up "A Midsummer Night's Dream," I started looking for Shakespeare quotes about "whole" and "all" on the internet and found "All's Well That Ends Well," where the King announces that "All is whole." That play also involves a Helena who creates a lot of trouble by meddling.

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  71. Hole in the wall / whole all
    My somewhat misleading clues were Robert (crimson mustang) Redford and Paul (new man) Newman. They both starred in a movie as part of the gang called the Wild Bunch. Paul Newman later in life started a young people’s group he named the Hole in the Wall Gang.

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  72. This week's challenge: This week's challenge is based on an idea by listener Jeff Lande, of Minneapolis. If a BOY is 5,839, and a COW is 6,874, how much is a FISH?

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  73. Blaine--your comment about "looking through" lists is also a reference to a "hole in the wall," which you can look through, even if you didn't intend it as a clue. As Joyce wrote, "A man of genius makes no mistakes. His errors are volitional and are the portals of discovery." So I proclaim you a man of genius, as others have.

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    1. At least I didn't say there's a place in France. :)

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    2. That last comment went over my head--which is not a clue or even a reference to a clue.

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    3. I guess you are unfamiliar with the song.

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