Sunday, April 17, 2022

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 17, 2022): Name That Vehicle

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Apr 17, 2022): Name That Vehicle
Q: Name a vehicle in two words — 4 letters in the first, 5 letters in the last. Move the second letter of the last word into the second position of the first word. The result phonetically will name a popular figure from legend. Who is it?
Is it the Skipper from Gilligan's Island?

Edit: In 1938's The Adventures of Robin Hood, another character (Little John) was played by Alan Hale, Sr., the father of Alan Hale, Jr. who played the Skipper.
A: FIRE TRUCK --> FRIAR TUCK

133 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. Once again, I was able to respond quickly. Oh, and to whom it may concern: Happy Passover, and Happy Easter! (Now, easy on those adult beverages! 😉)

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  3. Cute, but easy and also well tailored.

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  4. She Who Butchers Vowels is making my on air listen less and less tolerable, putting the Weakened into Weakened Edition, more and more every week. Meanwhile, this week's puzzle took dozens of seconds to complete. No clue here, no clue necessary.

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  5. Anagram the name of the popular figure from legend, and get a place where you might put a kind of food.

    Congratulations, lego!

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  6. Take a characteristic of the legendary figure. Imagine it inside the first word of the vehicle. You get a dire phrase.

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  7. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    Replies
    1. Good catch, but be a little less specific.

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    2. It wouldn't hurt Will to search the NPR website for a few key words before deciding on a puzzle, to avoid repetition like this.

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    3. OK, Blaine, the same puzzle was used (backwards) within this century.

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    4. Was shocked to find this exact puzzle in the archives, just reversed.

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    5. Buck, I was dismayed, and disappointed in myself.
      jan, and it wouldn't hurt the creator of the puzzle to search the NPR website for a few key words before submitting the puzzle to Will in the first place!

      LegoMeaMaximaCulpaToAll

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    6. Don't worry about it, Lego. I'm sure many of us who spent a fun Easter gathering with our families and are just now doing the puzzle are happy it's an easy one, even if repeated from the past.
      pjbTrustsEveryoneHasHadAGreatAfternoonOfHuntingEggs(OrInSomeInstances,AdultBeverages)

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    7. No one even considers you copied Lego. With simple puzzles it’s inevitable they will occur to many people. It’s on WS to know he’s running duplicates.

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    8. I do, too. Not your fault, Lego. This was WS's responsibility.

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  8. I welcome the first lego puzzle of Spring, which will surely bring in more than 2k right answers. I thought the on-air contestant was pretty quick today at making some tricky connections!

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    Replies
    1. When Will said "Photographer / Vaccination center" I thought of "proofs."

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    2. When he said "Ship / Blackjack dealer", I thought "hands", which he used later.

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  9. If my answer is correct, I learned of a new vehicle today.
    If it isn't, at least I have an alternate answer.

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    Replies
    1. On re-examination, I now have two vehicles, which at least to my ear, can be transformed per the instruction to yield the same popular figure.

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  10. I can't get Alfa Romeo, Aolfarmeo to work.

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    Replies
    1. That's par for the course for Italian cars, or so I am told. You might be surprised what can get out of order.

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  11. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  12. Hmmm, yeah, I thought this one sounded familiar.
    I sure would appreciate it if Will would get an intern to check the archives!

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  13. One of the fastest solves for me. Kinda underwhelming.

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  14. I’m sure that the assumed female hostess is not from Illinois. Don’t cancel me, dude!

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  15. Congrats, Joe!

    It’s a beautiful spring day here in Philadelphia. All the songbirds are singing.

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  16. I always got a big kick out of the chicken.

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  17. Speedily solved. Champaign and Oreos all around!

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    Replies
    1. The REO Speedwagon, often configured as a fire truck, was produced in Champaign, Illinois.

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  18. Congrats Lego! Will ought to rename the Sunday Puzzle segment the "Lego Joe & Eco Greg Show."

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  19. Sure would like to leave you guys a hint.

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  20. Replies
    1. (See the fabled bowdlerization of Larkin's "This Be the Verse": "They [t]uck you up, your mum and dad.")

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  21. Replies
    1. Think of a two-word phrase (4,5) which figured prominently in a popular movie of the previous century. Move the second letter of the second word to the second position in the first word to get a phrase often bandied about in the sports world.

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    2. "Daft prick" > "draft pick"
      What does that have to do with the puzzle?
      Absolutely Notting!

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  22. first that came to mind was the answer while driving to see the family for Easter. Kinda feel like I'm robbin the cradle though

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  23. A most timely puzzle, especially for those who are dining out today. Thanks, lego!

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  24. Who's preparing an Easter roast?

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  25. There is an odd, quirky connection to someone who was in the news last week.

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  26. Cinderella did not have balls. Unless, is there something we haven't been told.

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  27. For those who may have missed my post deadline joke I posted last week, here it is again. I think it is too good to waste.

    That Russian flagship, Moskva, sank because it was Nazi worthy.

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  28. There is a saying that uses the first word of the vehicle and a synonym of a homophone of the first word of the character.

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    Replies
    1. Out of the frying pan and into the fire (frying pan=fryer=friar).

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  29. Take the people you would expect as occupants of the vehicle. Anagram what you call those people (today, not in the old days), and you get an animal and an elected official, who might get involved if the animal were to escape its usual environment.

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    Replies
    1. That would be FIREFIGHTERS — TIGER, SHERIFF.

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  30. I'm visiting the great state of Texas right now and saw a sign that reads "Don't Mess With Taxes".

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  31. Well, if one doesn't get this one in 90 seconds one gets left behind.

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  32. It all came together in Exeter, NH, early one day early this year.

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    Replies
    1. I don't think that's enough information to give it away, do you?

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    2. That info + two things that can be easily inferred = it showed up on the first page of Google results.

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    3. Two things that can be inferred without knowing the answer already? I'm not inferring them!

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    4. You are implying them. The reader can infer what to Google for. I'll explain on Thursday. (In the end, of course, it still is Blaine's call. )

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    5. I suspect he was sent out to get some eggs and hasn't returned yet because he's having trouble finding any.

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    6. Yes, I thought of that too. Puzzle too easy anyway.

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    7. It's different when someone TMI's *you*, I guess.

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    8. Besides specifying Exeter, NH, your post implied that it was in January, and that it was public knowledge, meaning, it would have been in the news.

      Based on all that, people only needed to Google “Exeter NH January news,” and among top results would be this news article: Fire at Exeter NH Friar Tuck Drive.

      With “Friar Tuck” spelled out, plus the word “fire,” that is easy. (Your post also specified early in the morning, which the article confirms as well.) My guess is the same as Natasha’s: Blaine must have been away.

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  33. I hope no one gets too heated up about this puzzle over how easy it was because it was fun and that's what it's all about.

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  34. What came together in Exeter, NH ? I went to school there from 1953- 57.

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  35. Not to badger anyone, but I solved it as soon as I read it.

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    Replies
    1. winner of all the nostalgia points this week

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    2. Oy, vey, followed by a TM eyeroll.

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    3. Dante would appreciate the comedy.

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    4. In "Disney's Robin Hood", Friar Tuck was a badger. Searching "Badgers in pop culture" DID NOT lead to this, so, no it wasn't TMI.

      Some of y'all need to mind your own TMI.

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  36. Musical clue would be a certain band that shall go nameless.

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  37. There was a fill in segment last night on TCM where an actor of the past's daughter was interviewed about her father. Did anyone see it? His first big movie was mentioned.

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  38. Are all Mass shootings on Easter Roman Catholic?
    Gilbert Gottfried would be proud; others will be calling for Will Smith. I am content.

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    Replies
    1. Catholics are more into missals.
      Romans are into candles.

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    2. Catholics are more into misguided missals, as I posted last week, and Romans are more into Roman Hollandaise.

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  39. Mark Twain and Ernie Davis would get this in a dead second.

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  40. Two questions.
    What is the record for greatest number of correct submissions?
    Will this week top it?

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  41. Replies
    1. A close variation of this puzzle was used as the NPR puzzle 15 years ago in April of 2007

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  42. For those of you who are disappointed that this week's puzzle is so easy, here's a nice one (from the 538 blog):

    Find a word in the English language to which you can add a vowel, resulting in another word that has fewer syllables.

    You can add the vowel anywhere, including the beginning or end, but of course you may not rearrange the other letters.

    It took me a few days but I've got it!

    No spoilers! (538 will reveal the answer Friday.) But go ahead and give Blainesville-style clues :)

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  43. I think all of us are pretty satisfied with our puzzle answers this week, so I'd like to entertain something tangential. Did anybody see Johnny Depp testifying in this divorce case between him and Amber Heard? It sounds like he's trying to affect an English accent. I have to tell you, he looks hungover. But this clipped, hesitating way he talks makes it like an MKUtra deprogramming meltdown. Weird. I can't possibly believe anyone with an annoying affected accent. Sorry to be so negative because if anyone takes what I say seriously they're gonna make excuses like, "Well, maybe it's for a role he's playing." Nah, there's something wrong there.

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  44. A Blainesville-style clue to the 538 puzzle Crito posted:
    GI Joes & Barbies, Fighters & Dolls.

    LegoWhoWondersIfCritoIsDependingOnBlaineToBlogAdministerAnyTooMuchInfoHints

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    1. Oooooh, nice. Yeah no I don't think that's tmi. (I get it, but I had to think about it even knowing the answer.)

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    2. Besides fugu/fugue, which is what legolambda thought of (Foo fighters, Googoo Dolls!), there are a few other acceptable ones (coed/cooed; cation/caution; refed/reefed), and one magnificent one: beatify/beautify. Clearly fugu/fugue and beatify/beautify are the best, but I go back and forth between those two (pairs) for my fave.

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    3. Crito,
      I agree with you that fugu/fugue and beatify/beautify are the most elegant answers to the 538 puzzle (with "coed/cooed" as a solid third-place). And, I give beatify/beautify the edge over fugu/fugue because it is longer and also because its words are more familiar. "Fugu" is likely not on most people's "vocabulary radar."
      A friend of mine who contributes puzzles regularly to Puzzleria! told me he came up with "beatify/beautify," along with "coled/cooled" and "coled/coiled." ("coled" means "led, along with others").
      Thanks again, Crito, for bringing the 538 puzzle to our attention.

      LegoWhoConsidersAsFriendsAllTheTalentedPeopleWhoContributePuzzlesAndCommentsToPuzzleria!

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  45. FIRE TRUCKFRIAR TUCK, one of Robin Hood's band of Merry Men.

    This Challenge was first aired in reverse form April 22, 2007.

    The give-away clue: Friar Tuck Drive, Exeter, NH 03833...

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  46. FIRE TRUCK >>> FRIAR TUCK

    My Hint:
    "Cute, but easy and also well tailored." If you purchase a suit of clothes off the rack, you likely will need the tailor to take a nip and TUCK here and there for it to fit well.

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  47. (Thanks, Crito.)
    What the world needs now... is "Worldplay, sweet Worldplay!"
    Well, ask and it shall be given...
    Our friend Ken Pratt (screen name "geofan"), whose "Worldplay" feature has been gracing the pages of Puzzleria! for the past four years, is showcasing six delightfully clever puzzles this week that range in subject matter from
    1.) antonyms, to
    2.) economics, to
    3.) politics, to
    4.) wildlife, to life in
    5.) Australia, and life in the
    6.) United Kingdom!
    Come join geofan on his "Word tour around the World..."
    Puzzleria! uploads just after Midnight Friday morn, Pacific Daylight Time.
    This week's P! menus also feature:
    * a Schpuzzle of the Week that challenges you to "Stalk the Great White Way,"
    * a "Grilled Cheese Slice" involving hot dogs and hot rods,
    * a Dessert featuring an outdoor games and crop cultivation, and
    * a dozen riff-offs of my "four-alarm-friar" NPR puzzle.
    Get fired up for some "geofantastic" and "bonfiery" fun!

    LegoPerpetratorOfArsonAshSizzlingSolder&FireTruckery

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  48. Primary Answer: Fire Truck/(Frire Tuck) Friar Tuck.
    Alternate Answer: Fiat Truck/(Fria TTuck) Friar Tuck.

    I came up with Fiat Truck first, it was later that I hit upon Fire Truck. I’m looking forward to Sunday to see if Will accepts both answers.

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  49. FIRE TRUCK -> FRIAR TUCK

    > The same puzzle was used (backwards) within this century.

    On April 22, 2007.

    >> Is it the Skipper from Gilligan's Island?
    > Did the Minnow have a head, Blaine?

    On such a "tiny ship", it would have been a very Little John, the character (not FRIAR TUCK) played by Alan Hale, Sr. (the Skipper's dad) in Robin Hood. Or were you hinting at Alan-a-Dale(-sounds-like-Alan-a-Hale)?

    > It all came together in Exeter, NH, early one day early this year.

    FIRE TRUCKs on FRIAR TUCK!

    >> Not to badger anyone, but I solved it as soon as I read it.
    > But maybe TMI?

    The Wikipedia entry for Badger (In popular culture) says: "The 1973 Disney animated film Robin Hood depicts the character of Friar Tuck as a badger." That sounds like maybe TMI to me, but I guess not to Blaine. Sorry for ruffling any fur.

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    1. The Badger was voiced by Andy Devine, ergo my comment, "Dante would appreciate the comedy."

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    2. Interesting, I had a completely different thought on why this might be TMI. I googled badger, and there is a fire protection company called Badger, which can fairly quickly lead to fire truck.

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    3. See my comment above regarding your "Exeter, NH" post. The news article you are referring to was the same one that came up among top Google search results, hence my TMI concerns.

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  50. FIRE TRUCK, FRIAR TUCK

    Hint #1: “Anagram the name of the popular figure from legend, and get a place where you might put a kind of food.”
    FRIAR TUCK—> FRUIT RACK

    Hint #2: “A poet and a pitcher.”
    —> Roman “poet” Virgil —> American League “pitcher,” Virgil ‘FIRE’ TRUCKS (1917-2013).
    (P. S. Trucks is one of only 6 pitchers to have thrown two no-hitters in a single season. He was the uncle of the Allman Brothers’ drummer, Butch Trucks.)

    Even though the rest of the song isn’t personally apposite, I’ve been thinking a lot about the first two lines of Simon and Garfunkel’s “Keep the Customer Satisfied.”

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  51. FRIAR TUCK (from FIRE TRUCK)

    My clues:

    I was able to respond quickly.
    As the Fire Department (hopefully) would.

    Now, easy on those adult beverages.
    This one may have been a bit obscure: when you Google “Friar Tuck,” one of the top ten results is the website of a liquor store called Friar Tuck Beverage.

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  52. I wrote, “Take a characteristic of the legendary figure. Imagine it inside the first word of the vehicle. You get a dire phrase.” That’s “The fat is in the fire.”

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  53. Fire truck, Friar Tuck. No problemo. My "maid in the shade" was a little overboard. I need some whitey stuff ASAP. I've already downed 2 or 3 shots of vodka. I hope I don't sever the tip of my middle finger on a vodka bottle.
    Anyone have any paint to dip my finger in?

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  54. FIRE TRUCK, FRIAR TUCK

    "Dander up" >>> "Ire" is in fire truck.

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  55. I posted: I'm visiting the great state of Texas right now and saw a sign that reads "Don't Mess With Taxes"." It was a reference to the unaffordable taxes the people of Nottinghamshire we're subjected to, thus the reason Robin Hood had to steal from the rich and give to the poor.

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  56. I responded to Unknown's comments about Alfa Romeo by saying "You might be surprised what can get out of order." That was a reference to the fact that Friar Tuck did not appear to be attached to any particular order or abbey--which is anachronistic, or so I am told, because there were no mendicant friars in England during Richard I's reign. But why should we expect factual accuracy in a folktale first recorded centuries later?

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  57. "Reminds me of Lt. Worf."

    There is a scene in Star Trek TNG where a bunch of the characters are in the holodeck, playing a Robin Hood scene. Lt. Worf delivers the great line, "Sir, I protest. I am not a Merry Man!" I still laugh at that. First thing I thought of after I got the answer.

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    Replies
    1. I am reminded of Picard because of the scene above and because Patrick Stewart was King Richard in Robin Hood: Men in Tights

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  58. fire truck --> frire tuck --> Friar Tuck

    Last Sunday I said, “It’s a beautiful spring day here in Philadelphia. All the songbirds are singing.” Songbirds such as a Robin as in Robin Hood, friend and leader of Friar Tuck.

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  59. Fire truck, Friar Tuck. In my hint I commented that this was a timely puzzle, especially for those dining out on Easter Sunday. This referred to FT's being a Christian monk and the fact that there seem to be a plethora of dining establishments named after him.

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  60. I love the outdoors and camping and climbing and even occasionally sleeping in an igloo I've constructed, but after a couple of weeks or so I also am ready to return to the stability of a house and bed, along with other comforts. And this is why I have never been able to comprehend why it was that Robin Hood's men were so merry. At first I can see that it must have been exhilarating, but they had no shelter from the elements, nor cooking facilities or beds, and the only running water would have been a stream or river, certainly no hot water. As far as I can tell all they had to relieve their discomfort was a Little John.

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  61. FIRE TRUCK, FRIAR TUCK
    pjbSaysThat'sALongWayToGoForABadPun

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  62. My hint "Sure would like to give you guys a hint" alluded to Sherwood Forest.

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    Replies
    1. I had earlier posted a similar hint:
      "I sure would appreciate it if Will would get an intern to check the archives!"

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    2. I thought Blaine's "Gilligan" clue was in the same neck of the woods.

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  63. My niece Wordled in 1 today! I think she should retire now.

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  64. I am so sad to report the death of Orin Hatch and that it took so F...ing long.

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    Replies
    1. To son to be mispeling his name, sdb (and I don't think you can blame it on autocorect).

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  65. They're late getting the puzzle up on the website.

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    Replies
    1. I guess we'll have to listen to it live and try to transcribe it. :)

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    2. 1800 correct answers this week

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    3. Lotta folks are going to complain that this was too easy.

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    4. Yep, I transcribed it as best I could. See below. :)

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  66. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  67. I'm in no moo-d for this puzzle. Not cow-ering here. Drinking calf and calf regular and decalf.

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