Sunday, January 22, 2023

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jan 22, 2023): One Capital, Two Capitals

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jan 22, 2023): One Capital, Two Capitals
Q: Take a word that's in the name of several tourist attractions in our nation's capital, Washington, D.C. Rearrange the letters in that word to spell the names of two other nations' capitals. What are they?
If you anagram the two countries, you get a spicy warbler.

Edit: The cinnamon-breasted warbler belongs to the genus Euryptila.
A: MEMORIAL --> LIMA (Peru) and ROME (Italy)

192 comments:

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  4. A lot easier than last week's puzzle. Back to bed. No clue just fact.

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  5. This one came to me quickly...

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  6. Blaine when I anagram the two countries, I get something that all priests should be. What do you think?

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    1. I'm thinking of a single word, but your anagram is good too.

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    2. Clark, I get one word that fits but the other seems to be the opposite of what priests are. Maybe I have the wrong ones. (Each of mine is an anagram of a single country, no mixing of letters.) Looking forward to your reveal on Thursday.

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  8. Remove the third and fourth letters from the word in the attractions. Rearrange. You get something useful in sending.

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  9. Solved it on our morning walk. Happy New Year!

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    1. (It sort of means, solved by the experimental method, besides literally meaning solved walking. I thought it was appropriate in your case!)

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  10. Well, that was quick. If NPR was still accepting postcards, this puzzle would lead to more mail than they usually get. The two cities are six hours apart.

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    1. Six hours? If my answer is correct, you couldn't get between these two places in six hours even with a supersonic flight.

      Just to check, I believe that if you put the two cities in alphabetical order and anagram each one of them, you can get a phrase that (loosely) shows that you send a lot of things through the post office

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    2. He didn't say you could get from one to the other in 6 hours. He said they were six hours apart. (And, yes, the Concorde could fly the route in six hours.)

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    3. Aha. That makes more sense. And now I realize that I was essentially replicating JAWS' hint. It was so subtle that I didn't even realize it. Nice work.

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    4. All will be revealed on Thursday.

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  12. Visited one capital this past year, the other one 20 years ago. No clue here, unless you've been tailing me.

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  13. To paraphrase the Commodores, easy like right now.

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  14. This puzzle is almost too easy for a comment (i.e., my kind of puzzle), but I'll throw down my marker with a geographic clue: 29.49° N, 65.65° W. (Seem to have been a lot of clues which didn't survive moderation; I hope this is OK!)

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    1. With any other crowd, maybe. But not this one.

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    2. Bob: I get a different geographic location.

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  15. I visited one of the cities, but haven't been to the other.

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  16. My brother is currently in one of the cities. Met the love of his life, and is getting married there next week.

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    1. Sadly, no. It's really about formalities and all the legal mumbo-jumbo associated with an international marriage. They will have another big celebration stateside this summer!

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  17. I solved it by looking in the mirror.

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  18. Any body surprised that WS was so totally unapologetic about the awful wording of the last week’s puzzle .. he said “names” a food item… what did he mean by “names”… since when naming meant phonetic!

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  20. I'm predicting over one thousand correct answers this week.

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  21. Have you told Coleman Hawkins lately?

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  22. I can name this tune in one note, but I can't get from one to the other in 6 hours.

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  23. I liked last weeks puzzle. I note that on the NPR website - the answer is spelled FETTUCCINI, not fettuccine. That's rich. This weeks puzzle - pffft, you call that a puzzle?

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    1. Oh beans, what's wrong with a simple puzzle?

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    2. Cap, you post this complaint frequently, and the answer is so obvious. We want to be challenged, and we are not sixth graders.

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    3. Nope, you used the wrong pronoun; not we, but I. It's your opinion. BTW, Happy New Year.

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    4. The answer to last week's puzzle is posted as FETTUCINI (only nine letters for the "food dish in 10 letters)

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    5. Not only that, but it is supposed to be spelled with an E at the end, not an I. You just cannot get good minion help these days. FETTUCCINE

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    6. Oh, well, you know, gender is so flexible nowadays.

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  24. There are numerous varieties in each category.

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  25. Interesting…my usual go-to anagram solver found one of the capitals but not the other.

    Like at least one other commenter, I have been to one of the capitals but not the other. I have worked with people from that country, though, and a friend of mine from school married someone from there.

    Imagine you started a trip in that (latter) country, traveled across its neighbor to the south, then traveled east. The country you would arrive in is one I would be more likely to visit.

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    1. I use http://wordsmith.org/anagram/. I hadn't heard of yours until now.

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    2. And yours was new to me. Thanks for the info.

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    3. John, I just now checked out your anagram solver, the advanced setting. Too bad the advanced options don't include "allow proper nouns".

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  26. There is no clue in these comments for this week’s puzzle because none is needed.

    As for last week’s puzzle, I agree with Sarma’s and Word Woman’s feelings appearing above. After reading it I thought we had regressed to the bad old upside-down digital alarm clock days. Many others must also agree given only 140 correct answers submitted.

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  27. Yesterday, Buckingham Palace announced plans for the coronation of Charles and Camilla.

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    1. In the meantime China will remain the Corona Nation.

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    2. I thought that was Mexico?

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    3. Japan used to be the Corona nation till it was discontinued. But the US is still the corn nation, and tied with New Zealand as the car nation, on a per capita basis.

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    4. Didn't we used to be the condom nation?

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    5. The nation as a whole may have slipped out of that category, but it remains in full force in states like Oklahoma, except in September.

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    6. When you say "slipped," isn't that a bit of a stretch?

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    7. That's a hard one; I'm not sure.

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    8. Well, inflation is on the rise lately.

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    9. Yes, in spite of the Fed's prophylactic measures.

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    10. Some things defy measurement, even in a bubble.

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    11. The CPI can be expected to be up for an extended length of time.

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  28. Anybody else notice the NPR website doesn't have the new puzzle on it yet? I had to look up an individual public radio station to find a place to submit my answer.
    pjbIsDefinitelyMoreSureAboutThisWeek'sAnswerThanLastWeek's(BeganToHaveDoubtsAfterAWhileOnThatOne)

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    1. There's a link from the Weekend Edition Sunday page. And you can always submit an answer from an old puzzle page; they all link to the same place.

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    2. Yeah, I wondered about the missing new puzzle, too.

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    3. NPR Sunday Puzzle (Jan 22, 2023): One Capital, Two Capitals
      I clicked on this link at the top of this blog. Also, had no problem today with NPR site.

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  29. Voodoo cat toys is not a niche I'd have considered prior to today's on air puzzle player. Koodos (sic) to her for finding a niche that needed to be scratched ;-).

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    1. Word Woman, Princess of Priceless Prose!

      LegoKoodosIndeed

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    2. I thought I'd try to find Julie Gunn's voodoo cat toys on Etsy. No luck, but that's because I gave up after sifting through dozens and dozens of voodoo cat toy vendors there. Niche? More like an industrial sector! Wonder how Etsy deals with voodoo dolls that don't work (in terms of return policy)? Or how they deal with voodoo dolls that DO work (in terms of liability)?

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    3. Voodoo dolls have arms, and arms manufacturers aren't liable in the US. And anyway, the only thing that stops a bad guy with a voodoo doll is a good guy with a voodoo doll.

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    4. jan, it's hard to pin down those two disparate results.

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  30. What could be crueler than giving a voodoo doll to a cat. Ouch, ouch, OUCH, ouch!!

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  31. Musical clue: "The Music Man."

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  32. I doth protest. Much too easy....solved it while on the road. I visited one of these countries in the early 90s after viewing a total solar eclipse in a nearby country. A trip I'll never forget.

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    1. Yes, this is another insult to our intelligence. I emailed him 2 geographical puzzles, one of which is also culinary, last week that he could have used, but rejected. Lego will be using them next month on his Puzzleria! blog, and I believe you will enjoy them. We probably should demand more from NPR, since we are funding it.

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    2. Given the serious puzzlers posting here, many have to be getting increasingly dissatisfied with Will's offerings of late. This is the only puzzle I solve and even I am seeing a decline. For this one, what, maybe three words come to mind? And the solution fails to give even a two second thrill. After decades of weekly play, I think I'm getting ready to tap out.

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  33. Combine two other other nations' capitals and rearrange to find what we all are seeking.

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  34. I was visiting Washington DC this weekend and solved the puzzle on my drive back.

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    1. Just kept making right turns and driving in a circle, so as to stay within the border.

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  35. This word was also the answer to a puzzle in one of the Will Shortz puzzle books, although the puzzle itself was different.

    Divide the word in half. You'll get two words related to payments.

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  36. Unfortunately I think Will doesn't have his mind on the npr puzzle any longer. Plus, his 'helpers' at npr are not taking care of it either!

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  37. I would like to revisit last week's puzzle for a moment and offer some reflection.

    I suspect had it been more carefully worded it would have been one of the outstanding puzzles of late. Something like this:

    Think of a popular food item in 10 letters. Rotate one of its letters 90 degrees to phonetically reveal another popular food in 2 words. What are they?

    I think this would have been far more elegant and less ambiguous. And as for this week's 'puzzle' disappointment, I think it should have been relegated to Weekly Reader where it belongs.

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    1. I like your version of the puzzle! (Must be all caps though, right?)

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    2. Excellent point, Word Whisker.

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    3. I should also say that there are 3 convoluted clues hidden in my original comment yesterday. I wasn't really complaining about the puzzle, but in hindsight I guess I was! :) I'll explain Thursday.

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    4. The squeaky grease gets the wheel.

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    5. I would reply with another clever Spoonerism, or quip, but I have to dash off to the supermarket to get some sliced meat and cheese for lunch. So I am off now to the whore's bed deli counter.

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    6. I thought time flies like an arrow. And fruit flies like a banana.

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    7. sdb, your reformulation of last week's puzzle is clearer as you say but it does make the puzzle substantially easier since only a few letters in the alphabet can be rotated. Is that what you had in mind? Personally, I like a puzzle with 140 correct responses once in a while, given all the no-brainers we have gotten lately.

      PS: What kind of cheese once was the subject of a TV show?

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    8. I was not trying to make the puzzle easier, but fair. As it was presented it was unfair, and it was inelegant. In my suggested presentation above, it does not say which letter is rotated, nor anything about syllables, so I doubt it would have been all that much easier to solve, but I don't really care about that.

      I do not watch TV.

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    9. I don't eat lunch. That was a Spoonerism, in case you may have missed it.

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    10. Boar's Head, I got it. Have a nice day.

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    11. Good. I hate to waste a good one. Have fun.

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    12. What's the difference between a parachute and the Shakers?

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    13. Probably not your answer, but one lets you down on your feet, and the other lets you down on your butt.

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    14. Pretty good, but mine's a Spoonerism, in keeping with your "lunch" joke.

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    15. Ah, share a poot and packers. Clever.

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    16. One has shroud lines, the other has loud shrines. And I realize "shroud lines" is old nomenclature but it's what we called them during the 1970's when I was jumping, and it seems the term is still used when talking about rocketry parachutes.

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  39. For Blainesvillains who are finding the NPR Sunday Puzzle too easy and want more of a challenge, I recommend Alex Bellos's Monday Puzzles in The Guardian. Of course, Alex gives the answers the same day (but in a separate column), so you have to have some self-control.
    :)

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/series/alex-bellos-monday-puzzle

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    1. There may be some villains lurking here, but if we follow the pattern of Nashville, Jacksonville, Huntsville, etc., our demonym should be "Blainesvillian".

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    2. (I kinda like "Blainesvillagers", as in "it takes a Blainesvillage".)

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    3. Hm, but "villan" and "villager" don't make an internal rhyme.
      Okay how about "Blainesvillein"?

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    4. I thought we were just Blaine folk.

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  40. Anyone catch the mistake in Jeopardy last night?

    BOATING AFTER MEALS

    After a meal of legumes with friends it might be best to strategically position yourself alee, meaning away from this

    They were going for "wind", which is correct semantically, but *I* would rather be upwind of that crowd!

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    1. Lee Ward was a great Stanford fullback. And watch out for alee's left jab.

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    2. I didn't catch that, but got it "right."
      There was another iffy one (as there seems to be more frequently), but I'll have work at remembering it.

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    3. FJ bothered me in a few ways, with leaving out "northern hemisphere" part of "winter solstice."
      And calling the Tropic of Capricorn a geographical feature misses my sense if the term.
      Missed it BTW.

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  42. For some reason, I fell off the puzzle wagon for over a year. Returned with the new year. I am batting .75 this year. (Did not get fettucini)

    I didn't understand Blaine's clue (I seldom do) but other clues here match with my answer. This weeks puzzle was easy but it's one to remember.

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    1. I don't understand it either. Apparently it's one word, but I can't imagine what it might be, except maybe a proper noun I've never heard of. Looking forward to Thursday.

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    2. It doesn't take a genus to figure it out!

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    3. Phonetically? Only way it works for me.

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    4. Use a different anagram solver.

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    5. Do you know of one that produces a letter-to-letter match? The ones I tried only yielded a phonetic solution (but maybe that's where the spicy part comes in).

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    6. It's not a familiar word.

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    7. I have a word that satisfies your hint, it's just not an exact match with the two countries' letters.

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    8. Nodd, try the solver at anagram-solver.net. Click on the first word. The first three letters of that word match the first three letters of the continent of one of the countries.

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    9. OK, I entered the letters of the two countries on that site and clicked the anagram button but it generated no words. Was that what you were suggesting I do, or did I misunderstand? I do see that the last three letters of one of the countries match the first three letters of the continent of the other country.

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    10. You probably did it right, but in any case, you type the letters in the field under "Anagram to solve:" and press the Submit button next to it. For me, it gives two results. For letters with no anagrams, it should say "No answers found for" whatever.

      It also looks like you can bypass the UI by putting the search string directly into the URL, so you can type in anagram-solver.net/yoursearchstringhere

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    11. Now I see what happened. I mistakenly logged onto "anagramsolver.net" instead of "anagram-solver.net" as you specified. When I used the right solver, it returned the correct matching word you referred to. The word is different from the one I had, so apparently there are at least two terms for the same or a closely similar classification, but the one generated by anagram-solver is a better match for Blaine's hint. (I'm surprised none of the other anagram solvers I tried returned that word.) I feel better now. Thanks for the help!

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    12. BTW, the "phonetic" anagram I was trying to use was "Parulidae," which sort of sounds like "Peru-Italy" but doesn't fit the hint Jan kindly provided me because it's a family of warbler and not a genus. Plus it refers to New World warblers so it's a different family than Blaine's word, which I thought was an all-time great hint once I figured it out.

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  43. This week’s puzzle is so easy, here is an alternative time waster.
    Think of an International Capital in ten letters. Okay, let’s use Washington.
    1. Anagram to two words that Melania might say about Jan.6.
    2. Drop the last letter and anagram to a foul conveyance.
    3. Change the ninth letter to be one letter later in the alphabet and the tenth letter to be one letter earlier. Anagram to get something that might live in Washington.

    Add your own clever way of manipulating the letters in Washington.
    This is an example of what my brain does when I can't fall asleep.

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    1. My compliments to your overactive brain!

      Hints for your puzzles, assuming my solutions are right:
      1. No subject.
      2. Could be helpful if you're putting in a lawn.
      3. More likely living in south Florida these days.

      Some riff-offs I came up with (use all 10 letters):
      1. What Lula da Silva told the illegal loggers. (2 words)
      2. State of the universe before the big bang. (2 words)
      3. Found on the hotel patio in triple-degree temperatures. (2 words)
      4. Event that may cancel next day's events. (3 words)
      5. Fortune teller's question to man who didn't know his true birth date. (3 words)

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    2. Nodd, you got them. I got all of yours except for number 4. Hmmm.

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    3. Like number three, number 4 is seasonal in nature.

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    4. Good show, and thanks for posting your puzzles, which were a lot more interesting than this week's NPR challenge.

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  44. Murdaugh is being tried for Murder… wonder if our phonetics czar WS will cash in on this

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  45. Many years ago, when a friend of mine was visiting one of the cities, I was afraid that it would be too expensive for her to call me.

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    1. Reminds me of a New Yorker cartoon by Leo Cullum.

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    2. I expressed my concern that there would be Roman charges.

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    3. Was she Roman while at sea on his cherry yacht?

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  46. MEMORIALROME, Italy + LIMA, Peru

    Lincoln Memorial
    Vietnam Veterans Memorial
    Jefferson Memorial
    FDR Memorial
    Memorial Parks
    National World War II Memorial
    Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial

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    1. Exactly. Maybe next week's will be an actual "challenge."

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  47. LIMA, ROME (<— MEMORIAL)

    Hint (removed by Blaine): “A puzzle that might have been more appropriately offered a few months from now.”

    Evidently, a too-obvious allusion to Memorial Day.

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    1. I didn't think your hint was any more obvious than several others that weren't removed. My first post, "Another food puzzle," got zapped too, but a post that referred to "beans" and one with a two-word direct anagram of "memorial" were allowed. Of course, TMI's kind of irrelevant with such a no-brainer puzzle!

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  48. MEMORIAL, LIMA (Peru), ROME (Italy)

    I had commented: If NPR was still accepting postcards, this puzzle would lead to more mail than they usually get. The two cities are six hours apart.

    More mail is an anagram of Rome and Lima.

    Rome is GMT +1. Lima is GMT-5. So, the two capitals are 6 hours apart by time zone. I was deliberately vague on what I meant by six hours apart, because I had seen a number of previous comments get deleted.

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  49. I wrote, “Remove the third and fourth letters from the word in the attractions. Rearrange. You get something useful in sending.” That’s MAILER.

    How many of you tried to bust “Smithsonian” into two capitals before trying something more general?

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  50. MEMORIAL — ROME, LIMA

    My related posts:

    I have been to one of the capitals but not the other.
    I have been to Rome, but not to Lima.

    I have worked with people from that country, though, and a friend of mine from school married someone from there.
    Meaning, Peru.

    Imagine you started a trip in that (latter) country, traveled across its neighbor to the south, then traveled east. The country you would arrive in is one I would be more likely to visit.
    Start in Peru, travel across Chile, turn east, and you arrive in Argentina. That country is definitely on my bucket list, all the more so since last fall, when I read this novel, On a Night of a Thousand Stars.

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  51. MEMORIAL; ROME, LIMA

    "Solved it on our morning walk. Happy New Year!" We were ROAMing all over on our walk.

    Bob's coordinate clue pointed to the halfway point between the two cities. That seemed a bit too much info to me...with the way this group tends to suss things out.

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  52. My comment was "I doth protest. Much too easy....solved it while on the road. I visited one of these countries in the early 90s after viewing a total solar eclipse in a nearby country. A trip I'll never forget." (Political 'protests' in Peru have led to the closure of Machu Picchu. After viewing a solar eclipse in Bolivia in 1994, we visited those amazing Inca ruins. I'll never forget either experience. I was going to use 'memorable' but thought it was too close to 'memorial'. Also 'on the road' was a reference to 'all roads lead to Rome.')

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  53. "Puzzles Rudolfo" is our featured challenge on this week's Puzzleria! Our friend Rudolfo has unearthed an elegant gem of a number puzzle that deserves to be better-known. It involves putting ten different digits in a particular order. There are millions of possible ways to do so, but there is only a single correct answer.
    As a "bonus challenge," Rudolfo asks us to find an anagram using a 10-letter string of letters from the alphabet.
    We upload Puzzleria! early Friday mornings, after midnight PST.
    Our menus this week also include:
    * a "ring-around-the-blue-collar" Schpuzzle of the Week,
    * a puzzle that encourages you to "Dance bolder as winter grows colder,"
    * a Caesar Salad Dessert Puzzle titled "Hair follicles & Roman Empire follies," and
    * ten Memorialable “oral mime” riff-offs of this week's NPR puzzle.
    Join us for some memorable million-fold math, menus galore, and more!

    LegoDeMyriadesUnum

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  54. MEMORIAL -> ROME, LIMA

    > 1982

    The only time that Italy and Peru met in the World Cup. (They tied).

    > Yesterday, Buckingham Palace announced plans for the coronation of Charles and Camilla.

    Ignore the letters common to ROMA (I know, I know) and LIMA -- always best to ignore the commoners -- and rearrange to get ROIL, which sounds like ROYAL.

    [St. Edward's Crown, which will be used to crown the new king, was removed in December from the Tower of London for resizing. That's where the head of Charles's namesake was removed in 1649, an event we in Cambridge celebrate annually with a boat race called the Head of the Charles.]

    >> Many years ago, when a friend of mine was visiting one of the cities, I was afraid that it would be too expensive for her to call me.

    > Reminds me of a New Yorker cartoon by Leo Cullum.

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  55. My silly explanation of my silly "geographic clue" -- Also known as one equation in two unknowns --

    Combining the coordinates of Rome (41.54° N, 12.39° E) with those of Lima (-12.05° N, 77.04 W), applying what I hope is the correct arithmetic, I get my answer clue of 29.49° N, 65.65° W.

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    1. @Word Woman - I thought that was your objection, but I felt that a single point could be the half-way spot between terrifically many places!

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    2. @Bob K, true. It was likely only helpful if you already knew the answer.

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    3. I get 29.49° N, 64.65° W. You forgot to borrow 1 from the 77.

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  56. MEMORIAL, ROME, LIMA
    My hints:
    1. "There are numerous varieties in each category." (Rome is one of many kinds of apple; Lima is one of many kinds of bean.)
    2. "Musical clue: 'The Music Man.'" (The lead female character is "Marian Paroo".)

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  58. I wrote: This word was also the answer to a puzzle in one of the Will Shortz puzzle books, although the puzzle itself was different.
    It's Puzzle 70 in Puzzlemaster Deck: 75 Mind Bogglers: "An eight-letter word meaning a monument consists of four consecutive U.S. state postal abbreviations."

    I wrote: Divide the word in half. You'll get two words related to payments.
    Memo (field on a check) + rial

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  59. Blaine, who's your spicy warbler? I once knew a lady named Magnolia who might have qualified...

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    1. See Tortitude's posts to me of 12:21 and 1:19 yesterday if you want to figure it out on your own.

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  60. Memorial --> Rome, Lima

    Last Sunday I said, “There is no clue in these comments for this week’s puzzle because none is needed.” It just wasn’t a killer puzzle.

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  61. MEMORIAL -> ROME, LIMA

    Not a tough one. Especially as I was in Lima this past summer.

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    1. Was it small enough to tour by leg, u mean? (Never bean there myself.)

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  62. MEMORIAL, ROME(Italy), LIMA(Peru)
    pjbCouldAlsoSayIt'sMaine,Missouri,RhodeIsland,Alabama(SeeWhatHeDidThere?)

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  63. There are two additional fruits only using some of the letters.

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  64. You don't have to be a magician to solve this conundrum.

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  65. My first guess turned out to be right. I am more likely to drink the fruit juice than eat the actual fruit.

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