Sunday, February 04, 2024

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 4, 2024): Checking a Liszt...

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Feb 4, 2024): Checking a Liszt...
Q: Name a famous classical composer in three syllables. Change the vowel sounds in the first and third syllables, and phonetically you'll name a sport. What is it?
I thought I was close with Tchaikovsky

Edit: Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture includes a cannon while Pachelbel wrote a canon
A: PACHELBEL --> PICKLEBALL

247 comments:

  1. With two days to consider hints, here are two anagrammatic ones:

    Drop the first letter of the composer’s surname, rearrange, and get two words for a type of drink and a not uncommon reaction to it.

    Drop the third letter of the composer’s surname, rearrange, and get a two-word phrase for something we all at times can benefit from.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 1. Mind your manners.
      2. And it's hard to find.

      Delete
    2. Add one letter to the composer's surname by repeating the last letter. Rearrange to get what some people may hear regularly.

      Delete
    3. Wolfgang - I don't get this at all with my answer!

      Delete
    4. Hmm...you may have an alternate answer, then. 🤷‍♂️

      Delete
    5. How about the other clues, like Rob's, right below—did those work for you, Splainit?

      Delete
    6. My answer works with Wolfgang's clue.

      Delete
  2. Say out loud the most famous work of the composer followed by the last syllable of the sport. You get something that is fast and forceful.

    ReplyDelete
  3. This is a tough one, but I have it...

    ReplyDelete
  4. Replies
    1. Are you playing a John Cage piece?

      Delete
    2. "It doesn't matter what I say" is the opening line of Blues Traveler's "Hook", which famously uses the same chord progression as Canon in D and is a satire of that song and the music industry.

      Pachelbel, pickleball

      Delete
  5. Musical clue: Alice, not Carol.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks. I thought about being more specific, but feared TMI.

      Delete
    2. Nodd, when I finally understood your musical clue, I thought of an especially à propos reply: J. D.

      Delete
  6. The puzzle is not strictly correct, if the composer's name is pronounced correctly (in the language of the composer).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree too... but Will speaks English! (I assume Steve Baggish does too.)

      Delete
    2. Even using the common American pronunciation, it's a bit of a stretch.

      Delete
    3. I agree with both geofan and Jyqm.

      Delete
    4. Huh.
      Well, what I've found online pretty clearly says that in English, a standard pronunciation does match the sport exactly if you change those vowel sounds.

      But I see what you mean -- I do think a lot of people pronounce it in English in a way that wouldn't quite match up with the sport.

      Delete
    5. Crito, I will give you that Merriam-Webster has an alternate pronunciation of "Pachelbel" (in English) that has the second syllable the same as in "pickleball." :)

      Delete
  7. WIll acknowledged Centrum/Nurtec. 84 correct entries last week.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The number was surprisingly low, especially since there were two acceptable solutions. Moreover, the pharmacy misdirection should not have applied to the Centrum-Nurtec option. My personal theory is that more people actually answered incorrectly with Mucinex-Nexium with complete confidence. I was sure that this was the correct answer until I checked the blog later. Missing the direction about which letter to drop was pretty easy, especially for folks relying on their memory about what Will said on the radio.

      Delete
    2. I am not surprised. I got the Mucinex-Nexium, but never thought of Clairol, so didn't get the Clairol-Ricola. I've never heard of Nurtec.

      Delete
    3. I was one of the 84. But much as I appreciate Lady Gaga,.before I take medical advice from her..

      Delete
    4. Before I take medical advice from Lady Gaga, maybe I'll take investment advice from celebrity friends of Sam Bankman-Fried

      Delete
    5. As someone who has tried Nurtec, I would agree not to take medical advice from Lady Gaga. The drug didn't work for me at all. (To be clear, I took advice from my doctor and tried it well before Lady Gaga started doing ads for it)

      Delete
  8. You did great on air, Feinstee!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm really glad that was you and not me -- I don't think I was able to think of a single one before you got it! Oh except the last one(s) -- I think you were just worn out :)

      Delete
    2. Same thought here. It's a lot easier to take a country and find a 3-letter word inside than to start with a 3-letter word and build a country around it!

      Delete
    3. Agreed! Great work, especially since it wasn't your favorite category.

      Delete
    4. ViS-
      You and I have an advantage this week.

      Delete
    5. Add me to the list of those who were extremely impressed by your on-air performance. Good show!
      You were really quick... and really know your global geography.

      LegoWhoNotesThat"GlobalGeography"IsAnExampleOf"SightAlliteration"

      Delete
    6. Bellevue is not Seattle. I saw a few online news bits about this, but have heard no discussion of it here. It does not seem to be relevant to anything.

      Delete
  9. Feinstee, you did great. And I’m glad it was you that got the call and not me!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The questions did keep coming fast and furious

      Delete
  10. Replies
    1. Congratulations feinster., Well done indeed.

      Delete
    2. I apologize for misspelling your name. I tried to delete and correct. But congratulations anyway!

      Delete
  11. I'm trying to think of a hint that will earn me a barely passing grade.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We grade on a curve, in case that helps.

      Delete
    2. I'm not sure why Courtney's hint about the 'key' was considered out of bounds while mine was not. I think I could have done better; I give myself a D - . SDB's 'Dyan Cannon' was clearly out of bounds, as were a few others.

      Delete
  12. Super job, feinstee from Awesome-ning, NY.

    How cool is it that both you and last week's puzzle creator, Tortitude, are both Blainesvillians!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hadn't known that... pretty cool!

      Delete
    2. Yes
      One might say Blainesvlillians.are a specialized community of
      just normal folks, and you wouldn't be far off !

      Delete
  13. If a letter appears more than once in the composer's surname, then remove all instances of that letter. Then, remove the first letter. You can indeed rearrange the letters to get the surname of another composer.

    ReplyDelete
  14. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  15. You may be surprised to learn that one of our favorites here in Massachusetts is Welsh composer Llewellyn Cynndellpunns.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Hey I get Blaine's clue!
    I was trying to think of something in that neighborhood but I kept coming up with TMI hints.
    Let's see, I'll add: Beethoven pretty much the opposite of Tchaikovsky!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Just to be clear, is this last name only? Or full name, three syllables?

    ReplyDelete
  18. Replies
    1. And I forgot to mention your great on-air performance this morning, Mr. F. Way better than I could do.

      Delete
    2. Thank you, too. A credit to their editing.

      Delete
  19. I thought of a silly hint to apply to the composer, but then realized it applies even more to the sport, and would be removed due to TMI. In any case, my hint is classic TV.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Ok, got it. And agreed, I'm so glad I wasn't playing the on-air puzzle today...sheesh that was tough!

    ReplyDelete
  21. Both may be played at the hipsters' wedding.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I will wager that there is a phonetic connection from the composer to the book I am currently reading. I am highly confident that the subjects of the book did not play the sport.

    ReplyDelete
  23. To quote 2 famous NPR personalities..... I'm unencumbered by the thought process.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Got it! Better go check my class lists and update my syllabi.

    ReplyDelete
  25. I don’t have a clue but Professor Plum might. Nice job feinstee - sounds like you are a neighbor of Will’s!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks..and yes, like 10 minutes away

      Delete
    2. My brother actually lives IN the same town as Will S.

      Delete
  26. What did Vivaldi do when his Nikon broke?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. He made a concerted effort to get the airline to handel the repair, because they baroque it when they inspected his karajan.

      Delete
    2. He consulted Leonardo's papers and Jerry+rigged a Camera Oscura on a sunny day.

      Delete
    3. He may have used a Venetian blind.

      Delete
  27. This composer better not have worked in a pharmacy!!...

    ReplyDelete
  28. Played one of these just yesterday!

    ReplyDelete
  29. I still think MONSTER/MENTOS works just fine 🙂

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As far as I know, I was the only person here to submit MONSTER/MENTOS. Lonely at the top :) I expect Will never even saw it. The staff that screens these things saw that my submission wasn’t CLAIROL/RICOLA and put it in the discard pile forthwith.

      Delete
    2. That's a good one too. So many alternative answers. I can't think of any alt answers for this week yet...

      Delete
    3. I don't think anyone else submitted either ALAVERT/ALVERA or ROGAINE/A-G IRON.

      Delete
    4. I didn't solve it at all(and have been too busy anyway these past few weeks), but this one popped in my head right away. Sounds like a place to get food my Mom doesn't like. Hope that's not TMI for anyone!
      pjbCurrentlyListeningToTimeWarpWithBillSt.James,ButThey'rePlayingLastWeek'sEpisodeOverAgain!

      Delete
    5. Sorry, but it's TMI for anyone with a computer.

      Delete
  30. I was really hoping it would Wolfgang Sebastian Öxethrowüng

    ReplyDelete
  31. Great job, Feinstee! You were Goldilocks perfect -- not too fast not too slow. Also great to know that you are a neighbor! You seem to live about half way between me and the Puzzle Master.

    ReplyDelete
  32. Not leaving a clue for this week -- I dog this composer enough as it is.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rob Paravonian has thoughts about the composer.

      Delete
    2. Sorry, Iris Corona, that's TMI.

      Delete
    3. I agree with Jan on this.

      Delete
    4. Iris Corona, You know better than to post that!

      Delete
    5. sdb, Can you post the answer for your shoe puzzle? I cannot solve it. Thank you.

      Delete
    6. Natasha, here it is again along with a huge hint:

      Think of a very high end European men's shoe brand. Now say the brand name of the shoes and a major part of the shoes all in two words. Spoonerize the result to phonetically get the stage name of a very famous musical actress character. In other words the actress is a character in the musical and not a real person.

      Hint: Christopher Isherwood (Tortie solved it already)

      Delete
    7. Here's another hint. The character was portrayed in a movie by a famous actress and singer. Write the woman's name in capital letters. You will have only straight lines, no curves.

      TortieWhoWishesSheInventedThatPuzzleButItWasAWillShortzPuzzleFromAFewMonthsAgoProbablyinNYTimes

      Delete
    8. Thanks, Tortitude. I give up.

      Delete
    9. It's difficult to believe that post everyone objected to is still there.

      Delete
    10. I do not get it. Very strange.

      Delete
    11. Maybe the administrator of this blog has a different answer.

      Delete
    12. Obviously Blaine is away at the moment.

      Delete
    13. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    14. I'm just surprised that the author hasn't taken it down, given all the TMI feedback.

      Delete
    15. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    16. I posted the answer to the shoe puzzle, but then realized that maybe others were still trying to solve it. Let me know if it's OK to post the answer.

      Delete
    17. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    18. Answer: Bally, soles -> Sally Bowles in Cabaret. Sally was played by LIZA MINNELLI

      Yes and congrats to Tortie!

      BTW the soles on Bally shoes are very thin leather and look like they will wear out soon, but they last much longer than thick American leather soles. They are made in Switzerland, which is known for doing things right. I do not think they have ever lost one of their naval ships. They are known for their watchmaking. I have always wondered if, when a Swiss watchmaker closes up shop for the day, he employs a nightwatchman?

      Delete
    19. SDB: I found that answer yesterday but somehow did not think it worked. Nice puzzle.

      Delete
    20. Isherwood have liked to figure that one out. Very nice!

      Delete
    21. > Drop the first and last letter from the character's full name to get, phonetically, two terms associated with a sport.

      Alley, bowl. Reminiscent of Will's "Kirstie Allie" puzzle of December, 2016.

      Delete
  33. Just got it. I played this last summer at a KOA campground of all places.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Blaine,
    Fri, Feb 2 at 5:26 PM I posted a 2 word hint at this week's puzzle at last week's blog. I wanted to see if you might have removed it before I reposted it here. It has vanished without a trace. So i doubt you removed it, but perhaps blogger did. So I will not post it here until I get your okay first. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. SDB, was your posting on Friday a coincidence, or did you have advanced knowledge of the puzzle?

      Delete
    2. JAWS,
      At jan's request the puzzle was posted last week:

      feinsteeFri Feb 02, 10:52:00 AM PST

      Thanks, all! It was my least favorite topic ... geography. For next week ... Name a classical composer in three syllables. Change the vowel sounds in the 1st and 3rd syllables and phonetically, you will get a sport.

      Most here really do NOT read ALL the posts.

      Delete
    3. I frequently do not read all the posts. I looked at the blog very briefly on Thursday to see what the previous answer was, and then was busy with other things until Sunday, at which point this week's post was already up. With the limited time I had, I didn't want to read through 245 posts to see what was there.

      Delete
  35. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Last December…and the one before…and so on.

    ReplyDelete
  37. I originally made an assumption about how to change the vowel sounds. Once I gave up the assumption, the answer came easily.

    ReplyDelete
  38. Another famous composer wrote something about the same character and it wasn't a masked man.

    ReplyDelete
  39. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Change the first letter of the composer's name to a different letter. You can rearrange the result to get something unpleasant, often used as a verb meaning to complain.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    2. Anyone remember Crusader Rabbit?

      Delete
    3. Why, that's really clever, DMRosenblum!

      Delete
    4. Good one! Wasn't sure how far I'd have to go through the alphabet, but I hung in there.

      Delete
    5. Scarlett, if you use an anagram solver that accepts wildcards, you can skip doing one-by-one searches. For example, the solver at https://www.thewordfinder.com/anagram-solver/ accepts wildcards, so you could just enter ? + the rest of the letters other than the first to see results.

      Delete
    6. jumble solver accepts ? too.

      Delete
    7. Thanks for the tips. I've been using hanginghyena.com. It may have a similar feature. I'll delve deeper. In the meantime, I've learned some alternate sites from my fellow word nerds Thanks again!

      Delete
    8. Crusader Rabbit? Mebbe the first thing I saw on a TV. Don't think I knew what a rabbit was, much less a Crusader.

      Delete
    9. I think for me it probably was Howdy Doody in 1949.

      Delete
    10. Also that era: Midnight the cat, who said "Nice".

      Delete
  41. TMI alert ICU - That's a Bojack Horseman reference.

    ReplyDelete
  42. If you’re wondering whether the first name of the composer is included, I’m sure you’re not alone! Once I confirmed, the solution came quickly.

    ReplyDelete
  43. Is this puzzle a standard? Indeed!

    ReplyDelete
  44. One of my nieces lives NW of Los Angeles and due to the powerful storms going through the West Coast, her family has had to evacuate due to the threat of mudslides. Just wondering if Blaine is not monitoring this blog due to similar circumstances?? Just thinking out loud...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do not think so, any more than I believe he is taking a leave of absence in order to do what he can to help King Charles III in his time of need. He is simply not here and does wish to inform us as to why. Get over it.

      Delete
    2. Thanks for your valuable input...

      Delete
    3. 68Charger, Ah, sarcasm without the need to hear the person's tone of voice. Since I was born and raised in Brooklyn, I'd recognize an example of East Coast humor!

      Delete
    4. It could be he and his family were taken hostage by migrants invading the border, but I think it more likely he may have slipped on cake batter and suffered an injury.

      Delete
    5. I really hope Blaine is ok. The storm has been difficult for some areas here in California. I am not sure where he lives but I think close to SF or Northern CA. Luckily I did not lose power as my friends did.

      Delete
    6. You can easily locate his exact address online now that we know his name.

      Delete
    7. He's about 30 miles NE of SF. There was some damage and outages in that area during the storms.

      Delete
    8. It appears he has a Mail Boss brand mail box, which is the same one I have, and it is the best one on the market today.

      Delete
    9. Sounds like a challenge to a teen with a car and a friend with a bat!

      Delete
    10. With all the mail theft going on, you see many of the locking black metal box mail boxes. But beware! They are not all the same. The ones with the rivets are very easily popped open with a regular size screwdriver. The ones with no rivets are extremely difficult to get into without the special lock key. You cannot even get a duplicate made at a locksmith shop. Very hard to pick these locks. It took me a couple of weeks to break into the one belonging to the new owner of the house across the street from me a few years ago. His batch of lesbian renters purchased and installed the box, but when they left they took all 3 keys with them. I had to get very innovative in order to finally gain entrance and then order a new lock and 3 keys. When I got inside there is a key number, but ordering 3 keys is the same price as a new lock and 3 keys. When I got the job all done the new owner, a guy from China, bought me a brand new one for helping him. Just last week I was talking with a neighbor several houses down and his inferior brand with the rivets had just been broken into and the locking door way hanging down and open.

      Delete
    11. Thanks for the mailbox information. I thought of getting a new one.

      Delete
    12. https://www.mailboss.com/?gad_source=1&gclid=Cj0KCQiAzoeuBhDqARIsAMdH14FBtaAn_aBso3Hw0d3Uq6YD5Q7mFC35q6unMCWLncjwWsolGT8N4oMaAoI3EALw_wcB

      Delete
  45. Natasha, Did U C my answer to my puzzle?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, thanks. I actually solved it and did not think it was the right answer. Your hint helped tremendously. Great puzzle for NPR. You should submit it.

      Delete
    2. Did you not read the email I posted a while ago where WS indicated why he will never use any of my puzzles again? I will not submit any again either.

      Delete
  46. sdb: I posted at the other puzzle discussion way above.

    ReplyDelete
  47. Does anyone else recall doing jail time back in '81?

    ReplyDelete
  48. PACHELBEL, PICKLEBALL

    "Ah, Nodd, acerbic wit!" >>> Acerbic points to sour as in PICKLE.

    ReplyDelete
  49. Johann PACHELBEL (1653-1706) → PICKLEBALL = Paddleball sport combining elements of tennis, badminton, and table tennis.

    ReplyDelete
  50. PACHELBEL -> PICKLEBALL

    > Correction: MISPRONOUNCE the name of a classical composer. . . .!

    The voiceless velar fricative is not pronounced "k".

    > I think Will is going to get a lot of pushback from some here. I would expect better from someone of his . . . stature.

    I can't imagine Blaine allowing terms like "caliber", "big shot", etc, this week.

    > Anagram to get two opposites.

    "Chap" and "Belle"

    > I can't believe there's a practice machine for players of the sport, with a familiar name!

    Meet the Pickleball Cannon! (But does it play the music?)

    > What did Vivaldi do when his Nikon broke?

    He borrowed Pachelbel's Canon.

    More on the worst piece of cello music ever (with a shoutout to "One Tin Soldier", mentioned here a couple weeks ago).

    > Don't play with your food!

    Pachelbel's Chicken!

    >> Change the first letter of the composer's name to a different letter. You can rearrange the result to get something unpleasant, often used as a verb meaning to complain.
    > Anyone remember Crusader Rabbit?

    He and Rags, the tiger, hung out at Belly Acres.

    ReplyDelete
  51. Are you ready tonight for some brand-new "Brave New Worldplay?" Our friend geofan (aka Ken Pratt), whose Worldplay puzzle-packages have been gracing the pages of Puzzleria! since Spring of 2019, has produced an excellent sextet of geographical and miscellaneous puzzles for your enjoyment... and your bafflement! They are titled:
    “Oh, the zoology!”
    Slaughterhouse-Three?
    What’s an “alogous?”
    Something is “Rot-ting” in Denmark?
    “Dog whistle?” and
    “Coppy” oxymoron.
    We upload Puzzleria! every week on the cusp of Thursday and Friday, around Midnight PST, but probably earlier than that.
    Also on this week's menu:
    * a Schpuzzle of the Week titled "Capital City Synonomy,"
    * a Temptingly Evil Hors d’Oeuvre titled "Alphabetically awfully unlawful,"
    * a Super Sunday Slice titled "KanFrancis vs SayCee,"
    * a Flowering Spray Dessert titled "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn & a 'Flower Grows' in Nebraska," and
    * ten riff-offs of this week's NPR puzzle titled “ 'Canon-pickled' bell peppers.”
    So, why not drop by for some Worldplayful Wordplay?

    LegoSupuzzleriaBowler!

    ReplyDelete
  52. PACHELBEL —> PICKLEBALL

    Hint: “Drop the first letter of the composer’s surname, rearrange, and get two words for a type of drink and a not uncommon reaction to it.”
    PACHELBEL -P —> ALE BELCH

    Hint: “Drop the third letter of the composer’s surname, rearrange, and get a two-word phrase for something we all at times can benefit from.”
    PACHELBEL -C —> ABLE HELP

    ReplyDelete
  53. Pachelbel/Pickleball. It seems like pickleball has exploded in popularity. Two big warehouses were converted into indoor courts in my neighborhood in 2023, and the parking lots are packed from 7am to 10pm.

    ReplyDelete
  54. I wrote, “Say out loud the most famous work of the composer followed by the last syllable of the sport. You get something that is fast and forceful.” That’s Canon-ball.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My riff on your hint was See Jones. Casey Jones' train was Cannonball.

      Delete
  55. PACHELBEL — PICKLEBALL

    My clue:
    Last December…and the one before…and so on.
    Alluding to the fact that the "Christmassy" version of the Pachelbel canon can often be heard on the radio during December, in a way that resembles the repetitive recurrence of the main motif(s) of the piece.

    I also posted:
    Add one letter to the composer's surname by repeating the last letter. Rearrange to get what some people may hear regularly.
    That would be a chapel bell.

    ReplyDelete
  56. Pachelbel, Pickleball The "Prisoner of Pachelbel" cartoon from The New Yorker immediately came to mind. How I can remember a 40+ year-old cartoon is anyone's guess.

    ReplyDelete
  57. PACHELBEL, PICKLEBALL. My hint: “Musical clue: Alice, not Carol.” (In “Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice,” Alice was played by DYAN CANNON. Pachelbel’s best-known composition is “CANON in D.”)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nodd, my “J. D.” reply on your “Musical clue: Alice, not Carol” hint was a reference both to Jackie DeShannon, whose version of “What The World Needs Now Is Love” was featured at the end of Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (Alice having been played by Dyan Cannon) and your chosen profession. Did I get the latter right?

      Delete
    2. Yes, Dr. K. So technically, I am a Dr. too, though nobody calls me that but my dentist. We used to be called LLB's till the 1970's or so.

      Delete
    3. My students, often finding themselves challenged by unusual surnames, especially those of more than two syllables (mine is 4), tended to call me Dr. K, hence the user ID. On the other hand, one of my colleagues used to call me Special K, but he was a cereal punster.

      Delete
    4. Dr. K,
      You have me laughing now, because recently I forced myself not to refer to you in a post, or email, as Special K.

      Delete
    5. Was your colleague related to sdb? It's interesting that you are a hoops player, like the Dr. whose name starts with the letter preceding yours.

      Delete
    6. Sdb, feel free. I not only got quite used to it but found it rather endearing.

      Delete
    7. Nodd, no, my colleague was not a hoopster, but he was a fellow guitarist. My claim to b-ball fame--a six-degrees-of-separation story--was that I was on a team with someone who had played against Dr. J in college. When George told me, my jaw dropped. I said, "Geroge, what was that like, playing against the Dr.?" George, who is 6'7" and athletically gifted, replied, "Freshman year Erving was a skinny black kid from Long Island. Sophomore year, he left sneaker burns on my shoulder."

      Delete
    8. I thought I had already over milked it.

      Delete
    9. With so many comments, it's hard to keep abreast of the discussion.

      Delete
  58. PACHELBEL, PICKLEBALL
    I said Blaonesvillians were a specialized community of regular folks, in other words "ORDINARY PEOPLE"



    ReplyDelete
  59. My comment was: "To quote 2 famous NPR personalities..... I'm unencumbered by the thought process." For some reason, the Car Talk guys use of the word "unencumbered" reminds me of cucumber, which leads to pickleball.

    ReplyDelete
  60. I forgot that I posted 2 hints this week. The first was "Dyan Dannon" who might remind you of Cannon in D, by Pachelbel. I posted this at the end of last week's blog, but not here due Blaine's absence.

    The other hint was: "ViS-
    You and I have an advantage this week." This was in response to Vandal in Seattle's post. Pichelball was invented across Puget Sound from Downtown Seattle:

    Pickleball History | Pickleball Origin
    USA Pickleball
    https://usapickleball.org › What is Pickleball?
    Congressman Joel Pritchard, Barney McCallum, and Bill Bell invented the game of pickleball one summer afternoon in 1965 on Bainbridge Island, WA. In Barney's ...

    ReplyDelete
  61. Can someone please explain Blaine's clue? Been wracking my brain, and coming up empty.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think it refers to the 1812 Overture.

      Delete
    2. Ahhh, yes, the cannons. Thanks! (Now I'm embarrassed.) 🤦🏼‍♀️

      Delete
  62. In reply to Paul's hint about 'a passing grade', I hinted:
    "We grade on a curve, in case that helps."

    A grade distribution would typically be a BELL curve.
    Yeah, in retrospect, not much of a hint.

    ReplyDelete

For NPR puzzle posts, don't post the answer or any hints that could lead to the answer before the deadline (usually Thursday at 3pm ET). If you know the answer, submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't assist with solving. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the deadline. Thank you.