Sunday, May 26, 2024

NPR Sunday Puzzle (May 26, 2024): Lights, Camera, Action!

NPR Sunday Puzzle (May 26, 2024): Lights, Camera, Action!
Q: Think of a well-known actor of the past whose last name is also a brand name. Remove the last letter of the actor's first name and you'll have a product produced by that brand. What is it?
We could have had this puzzle about 3 weeks ago.

Edit: ...on Star Wars Day (May the 4th)
A: ALEC GUINNESS --> GUINNESS, ALE

211 comments:

  1. Got it. Well, it’s not Ward Bond or Glenn Ford.

    Eliminate two consecutive letters in the actor’s surname, and the remaining letters in order spell a word relevant to this blog.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Rearrange the letters in odd positions in the actor’s name. You get something that can be found in a family tree.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My answer only works if you also use letters 2 and 6 of the name. I guess I'm thinking of a different word.

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  3. Congratulations to those who got it without consulting a list.

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  4. I actually understand Blaine's clue, or I *think* I do. --Margaret G.

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  5. Replies
    1. Had Bogie starred in a production of "Bye Bye Birdie" would it have been a subpar performance, or the opposite? I am confused!

      LegoWhoOnceScoredADoubleEagleOnAParThreeHole(NowYouAreConfused!)

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  6. For some, this Holiday weekend may be appropriate for this product.

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    Replies
    1. True for either answer, lol. See below. No more comments from me. Getting too close to TMI-land...

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    2. For some it could be a reminder of loss....

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  7. I have two answers, one a little obscure...

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    Replies
    1. Yeah, me too -- the obscure one is the one I thought of almost instantly.

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    2. I think I have the obscure (although perfectly reasonable) answer.

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    3. Does yours have a connection with Findlay? (I've checked and it's quite difficult to get back from Findlay to this connection, but pretty easy to get from the connection to Findlay.)

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    4. I have an alternate obscure answer that connects to a state in the middle of the U.S.

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    5. I think my answer is an alternate too. The brand only existed a short time.

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    6. Okay, I got what I believe's the intended answer, though it may not work with one of the above hints. The answer reminded me of a household cleaning product.

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  8. Too bad his name isn't Wrenchy Allen

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    Replies
    1. I was hoping to discover that the Marx company made harps.

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    2. Well it's not HARDY OLIVES...

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  9. Easy one again. One of my all time favorite actors.

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  10. Will and Bob are indeed correct about the product, but I almost missed out because it's not generally called that.

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  11. Nice puzzle! It deserves to be brought back every six years.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow! It is an exact repeat, and I had forgotten entirely.

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    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  12. The actor and the product are personal favorites. My wife and I are actually planning a vacation that will take us where the product is made.

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  13. The actor's original surname implies improvisational skill.

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  14. I got it. Here's a spinoff puzzle. Think of a well known actor of the past, first and last names. Remove the last letter of the first name and you'll have something sold by the government in the 1940's. Who's the actor?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cap, see my comment above. Sorry about that.

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    2. Dr. K,

      No problem. I was half asleep when I posted the spinoff.

      Delete
  15. Hope this isn’t TMI, but it isn’t Cary Grantmobile.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Turns out there was a car company called Grant in the early 20th century! I had to check here to make sure that wasn't the intended answer.

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    2. It is a valid puzzler answer, as I see it.

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  16. My (adult) child is named after this actor.

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    Replies
    1. Wow, that is quite a coincidence!
      Although, hmmmmmm. He may be misnamed.

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    2. Coincidence? No, sir, specifically after this actor.

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  17. Replies
    1. In hindsight, I'm surprised it took me so long to get the answer.

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  18. I don't know much about lingerie. Is there a bra company named Pitt?

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  19. The label on this product is a work of art.

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  20. I think there are two possible answers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree, which is why some previous posts should probably be redacted. Alternate answers deserve the same respect as the intended answer if they are legit.

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    2. I wonder if the alternate answer was even thought of by the puzzle contributor.

      Delete
  21. Norrin2 beat me to the punchline. Now I have to think of a clue.

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  22. As soon as I stepped into my Ford Harriso, I got the answer.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For me it was a Lollobrigida martini.

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    2. My favorite car is the Grant. It's English and oh so elegant. And it looks great in a tuxedo pullover!

      Delete
  23. Less discourse this time around. . .

    ReplyDelete
  24. I wonder if P______ may lodge a C________.

    LegLambda

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  25. I came up with two answers. When I put my head to it, though, I narrowed it to the better choice.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ALEC GUINNESS

      Alec Baldwin works as well, but not as nicely, since I've never seen someone order a Baldwin Ale, though it exists.

      My clue:

      I came up with two answers. When I put my head to it, though, I narrowed it to the better choice.

      The Head obviously refers to the Head of the Glass of Ale.

      Delete
  26. I searched the archive of this blog from a few years ago, but I couldn't find the post I was looking for.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I found the post easily. Keep checking.

      Delete
    2. I searched again and cannot find it. Depends on the search words I guess. It is not recent.

      Delete
    3. It appears that Blaine has temporarily (and correctly) taken that week down.

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    4. I was thinking that this was familiar...

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  27. Replies
    1. While I can't say that I'm particularly familiar with ALEC GUINNESS, thanks to the The Simpsons episode "Lisa's Rival" I'll never forget that his name anagrams to "GENUINE CLASS."

      Delete
  28. Got it, but I consulted a list to find it.
    pjbSaysYouWon'tBeAbleToForceAGoodEnoughHintOutOfHim

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  29. I get so annoyed when Ayesha answers half the questions before the guest can even respond, she is awful at this role, really miss Lulu

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    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. people have been trying for years even decades to get 2 min on air with Will and she hijacks constantly, it's like a child grandstanding another kid's birthday party

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    3. Just prior to the on-air challenge, Will said, “All right, Tom and Ayesha, this is a good two-person puzzle, so, Ayesha, feel free to jump in.”

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    4. Should she not give the winning guest a moment or two to at least attempt though? He's been playing since post card days and three of them she started talking immediately before Tom could say a word

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    5. I don't disagree, but I suppose it depends in part on how Ayesha interpreted "feel free to jump in."

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    6. fair point but this is a regular thing with her that was not the style of all prior hosts and I find it very unfair to the rare chance one of us makes it on air

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    7. Yes, Will invited her to answer along as well. And as we know, sometimes, the most difficult answers are toward the end, so I think she let the guest have the harder, ones. It's only a game.

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  30. Interesting that the puzzle question asks only for the product.

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  31. Yes, sir, solving this made me smile.

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  32. I consider this actor to be more than just "well known"

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  33. If any letters repeat in the surname, delete any duplicate(s), leaving one of each. Rearrange the result to get a word that describes many on this blog, present company excluded.

    ReplyDelete
  34. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  35. I will be pleasantly surprised if anyone here knows the title of the actor's favorite movie. Please do not reveal it here until after the Thursday deadline though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Did you enjoy it as much and I? I even have a copy on DVD.

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    2. I think I know and I will tell you how I know after deadline. Good question!

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    3. I have watched it several times since I first saw it in the theater when I was 15.

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    4. I've never seen this one but it's on my list for the day off tomorrow, fitting

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    5. Well, now I feel I must report that I am glad I posted the above because, along with, and mostly because of, the comments that followed, I had a desire to drag my copy (forged, of course) out of its slumber and watch it yet again, along with all the interviews provided as extras on the DVD. I have to say it is still just as fresh and moving now as when I first saw it on the big screen. It has now occurred to me that there are not very many movies, or plays, for that matter, one can say that about. And that suddenly caused me to have a greater, and perhaps more realistic, appreciation of how difficult it must be to be an honest professional film critic. I say this because there are so many low quality movies being made, and now more than ever due to the new technology that makes them easier, and sometimes cheaper, to make. But now I realize that the poor critics cannot constantly tell us that the film we have been looking forward to perhaps should not have been made at all. They must at lease force themselves to pander to the lowest common denominator, or not be read or listened to. I have always felt that story is most important, but the acting is what brings it to life, and without both being present there is little reason to watch a film or play—better to read a book. Unfortunately that thought is not shared by many in the entertainment business today, where special effects seem to rule instead.

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    6. SDB: I agree with a lot that your posted above regarding movies.

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    7. Chatgpt knew the answer to favorite movie right away!

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    8. Well, maybe. I just asked ChatGPT, "What was [BLANK]'s favorite movie?", "What was [BLANK]'s favorite role?", and "What was [BLANK]'s favorite movie role?", and I got three different answers, none of which was the 1960 film. When I asked specifically about that one, ChatGPT said it "is another film that [BLANK] held in high regard". As always, ChatGPT (like a certain politician we know) likes to talk a lot, but what it says should never be taken at face value.

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    9. jan, I got the same false report. I know the answer because I read this author's carbiography, I mean autobiography.

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    10. I will see if Chatgpt was correct Thursday, I guess.

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    11. If there was only a place on the web related to Sunday Puzzles that you could post the name of the autobiography before Thursday evening. I need something good to read. Then I could say, like you, I've read it.

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    12. If you are looking for something really good to read, I highly recommend, A Woman I Know, by Mary Haverstick. Your library will have it.

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    13. thanks again for the trivia here, just finished the movie and it was such a well written story, never would have seen or heard of it otherwise most likely

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    14. I found "A Woman I Know" interesting, but unconvincing.

      Delete
  36. Chatgpt got the alternate answer to the sunday puzzle right away. amazing!

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  37. This puzzle will have a record number of correct answers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'll bet Rake Broom and Breakroom will still hold the record. Or Hula and Luau.

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    2. Alec Guinness is like the Guinness Book of World Records.

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  38. My favorite too. There can't be another perfect answer.

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  39. Looking forward to hearing Matt's four answers on Thursday...

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  40. I think when host Ayesha mentioned the Michael Jackson song "Heaven Can Wait" this most assuredly triggered the racist tirade delivered by "Mike" and seconded by "Natasha," above. I am ashamed to read Mike and Natasha's cringeworthy comments. Ayesha's reference to Michael Jackson took the emphasis from the nostalgic golden-era (and racist) Hollywood glory days when Blacks were depicted as butlers and maids to the present day reality of Black super success as brought to us by Michael Jackson. This is typical elitist, brie eating liberalism. The kind of liberalism that wants to portray Blacks as victims so the great government-funded Liberal elitist white savior can rescue them from the evils of white Republicanism. No, Mike and Natty, you're not the kind of white racists who would light a cross at a KKK rally. You are the kind who probably laugh at movies like Blazing Saddles and are impressed by Peter Sellers in Being There, especially the Bas'setball Jones sequence. You are the kind who probably groan with dismay when you hear, or are reminded, that Michael Jackson owns the copyrights to the Beatles catalogue. You can't deal with Black success, just failure. Joe Biden's disgraceful commencement address at Morehouse College is your style. God help us! God help us!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do not know what you mean by racist. I have multiple races in my family. I was not referring to Heaven Can Wait. I give up. I am off of this blog.

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    2. Natasha, please do not let this jerk to scare you off. He is an ignorant Trump supporter.

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    3. SDB: Thank you for support. I have so many nationalies in my family. We could joing the UN! So hurtful to read this Trumper's hateful comment. I did not even hear the first part of the broadcast. I did not know what he was referring to about MJ. song. I just heard it now.

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    4. Natasha, You should have seen the rant he posted a couple of weeks ago, but then self deleted. It was just as bad or even worse. I think I still have it on my hard drive if you want to read it. You can send me your email address. Mine is one you should be able to discover swiftly.

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    5. Ok. I did not know about that. Thanks!

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    6. That's a lot of ugly words you got there fella.

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    7. Please explain with any quotes where I said anything racist at all? I'm half Vietnamese, and I love Lulu and Audie. What a horribly lazy dogwhistle for a criticism of hosting, you are a cad to make such a leap of opinion. No wonder you were so dismissive in your reply. Cowardly fake news bs'er

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    8. Natasha, Mike and TomR:
      Tomorrow evening you folks are invited over to my place for what I think will be a delightful evening of watching Mel Brooks' great film, Blazing Saddles, followed by Peter Sellers in Being There. I will be providing wonderful bottles of Noval LBV Port, along with a pitcher of Negronis and a spread of French brie and red seedless grapes with crackers. I do hope you can all make it. Please arrive between 8:00 and 8:30 PM. Don't forget to wear your Vote Biden buttons!

      Delete
    9. Sounds like a plan SDB, fantastic movies that certain cretins who understand neither critique of job performance nor satire could ever hope to comprehend.

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    10. Musinglink, this just might be the least helpful clue in solving a puzzle I've ever read.

      Delete
    11. SDB: So thoughtful of you to be so kind.

      Delete
  41. Replies
    1. "Prolonged battle with cancer." He deserved a better way to go. He was true sports hero, someone who always seemed humble and giving back.

      From BillWalton.com:

      "Walton is currently the Executive Chairman of Connect SD Sport Innovators (SDSI), a non-profit, business accelerating, trade organization that connects and drives the growth of Southern California’s vibrant sports economy by offering innovative programs and services for startups, mature companies and service providers. SDSI offers mentoring, education and capital funding opportunities for start-ups; best practice collaboration, access to new technology, and public policy advocacy for mature companies; as well as deal flow to our service providers and the Southern California Investment Community. Bill is also a board member for the Junior Seau foundation."

      Delete
    2. Buck Bard, my son lives in San Diego in the same neighborhood as did Walton, and he came across this in an online SD forum:

      He was in the suite next to us one year for opening day of the padres. I caught one of those squishy padre balls from the pad squad. Well he asked to see it so I tossed it to him but he dropped it down behind the fence. He was mortified, he must’ve apologized 10 times even though I told him it was no big deal. Before he left he asked me for my address and said I’m gonna send you some things. I was thinking suuuure ya are bill. Well two months later a big ass box came in the mail. It had two signed basketballs a signed jersey and probably 20 signed pictures. With a note saying I really dropped the ball on that one 😂. What a class act RIP Mr Walton.

      A good soul.

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    3. That's a wonderful story. I am not at all into team sports, but I was aware of who Bill Walton was, along with him being very tall. I got into Transcendental Meditation in 1970 and occasionally our Seattle chapter would offer weekend retreats, which we referred to as residence courses. One popular location was at a Catholic retreat location in Beaverton, Oregon, a suburb of Portland. It was run by nuns, one of which was very friendly to our organization and was popular with us. One time when I arrived there to spend a few days there was a rumor that Bill Walton was going to arrive there sometime that day. I do not remember why he was coming, but I do not think it had anything to do with why we were there. I was barely 6' tall, but this nun came up to me just after I arrived and asked if I was Bill Walton. I thought it was very funny. I never did see him, but a few years later this nun quit due to the Mother Superior who ran the place. She was opening and reading their private mail. That was the final straw.

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  42. Just to keep things sophomoric, a ditty we all know with a tune from a 1957 film mocks a character from a 1973 film.

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  43. Genuinely pleased to have come up with this

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  44. Why is it hard for funeral directors to predict their income each year?

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    Replies
    1. Any business that relies on Lay-away plans will find it difficult to predict their income.

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    2. Good one. My answer was, because they never know in advance what they will urn.

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    3. The undertaking business has long had a cloak of secrecy shrouding it from the public who in many cases is unaware of what a bone grinding job cremation is, and then to watch your work go up in smoke.

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    4. Nodd,
      I enjoyed your humorous post, but I have to say there was no plot to the story.

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    5. A grave omission on my part.

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    6. Okay, enough of this. Let's scatter while we can.

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    7. Agreed. I worry the mortality police may disapprove.

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    8. You may very well be right about that, but I am not one who pays attention to hearse A.

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    9. I would presume hearse A to be reliable. After all, it is always in the black.

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    10. You may choose his; I'll choose hearse.

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    11. I think we've hit a dead end. Let's not run this into the ground.

      Delete
    12. Yes, it is time for this subject to be finally laid to rest.

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    13. Agreed. Let's go have a bier.

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    14. Sorry, I have a pyre commitment.

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    15. I intend to be composted. It don't get mulch better than that.

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    16. Because of the price volatility of formaldehyde?

      (Sorry, I'm one of the three ex-chemists on this blog.)

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    17. Composting -- there's a fertile ground for discussion.

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    18. To be; or tuber; that's the question.

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    19. So close to the deadline! I'm appalled!

      Delete
  45. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  46. ALEC GUINESS, ALE


    "Well, this is awkward." (or should I say owkward) refers to Guinness's role as Obi-Wan Kenobi in the original Star Wars trilogy.


    "I have an alternate obscure answer that connects to a state in the middle of the U.S." refers to ALEC BALDWIN, ALE and BALDWIN Brewery in Kansas.


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's Baldwin BEER. Beer and Ale use different fermenting yeasts...

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    2. That was my first answer but clues did not match.

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    3. Nonsense. There's no such thing as Beer.

      Delete
  47. 1. ALEC GUINNESS → GUINNESS ALE

    2. CARY GRANT → A GRANT CAR. See the GRANT MOTOR COMPANY

    ReplyDelete
  48. Alec Guinness/Ale

    My wife and I are planning our next vacation as a trip to Ireland and Scotland. As a retired Chemical Engineer whose hobbies include beer and wine making, a visit to the Guinness Brewery is high on our wish list, as are visits to certain similarly famous Scottish sites!

    ReplyDelete
  49. Bobby Jacobs' "Puzzle Fun" is our featured "coming attraction" on this week's Puzzleria!
    Bobby has adopted a pseudonym this week, TIMOTHY AXOY, which coincides with his theme: "Vertically Symmetrical Vexations: Reflections from “Tim Axoy." Every answer to Bobby's trio of puzzles consists of letters that, when written in UPPERCASE LETTERS, possess vertical symmetry... like T I M O T H Y and A X O Y, for example.
    We upload Puzzleria! later today, sometime before Midnight PDT.
    Also on our menu this week are:
    * a Schpuzzle of the Week titled “Fishy side-by-side synonyms,”
    * a three-part Riffing-Off Timothy Axoy Hors d’Oeuvre titled "Hifalutin makes & models,"
    * a Baptismal Slice titled “Out damn stainy sinful spot!”
    * a "poetic" Iambic Dessert titled “Old King Alf’s rambling wager,” and
    * eleven Riffing Off Shortz And Fecho Slices, titled “A round of Guinness, Barkeep!” including six created by Nodd, one by Plantsmith and two by a valued friend of Puzzleria!
    That adds up to 20 puzzles!

    LegoWhoInvitesAllBlainsvilliansToJoinUsForSomeVerticallySymmetrical"BobbyJacobsPuzzleFun"

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 😀 YAY, TIMMY AXOY! These are wonderful and fun puzzles!

      Delete
  50. ALEC GUINNESS (ALE)

    > Difficult to clue this star of the silver screen without giving too much away.

    Silver = Ag = his initials

    > It isn't Bogey, is it?

    The Colonel Bogey March was featured in The Bridge on the River Kwai, one of his best-known films.

    > Salhyr

    Crimea river -> Cry Me A River -> The Bridge on the River Kwai -> etc.

    > I searched the archive of this blog from a few years ago, but I couldn't find the post I was looking for.

    Riffing off Blaine's hint from the last time this puzzle was used: "These are not the clues you are looking for...", a Star Wars reference, like his hint this week.

    I was thinking of listing just the ranks and titles of characters he played, but thought the profusion would be too revealing:

    Aircraftman
    Flight Lieutenant
    Lieutenant
    Captain
    Major
    Colonel
    Lieutenant General
    General
    Admiral
    Knight
    Earl
    Duke
    Dauphin
    Prince
    King
    Führer
    Priest
    Monsignor
    Cardinal
    Pope
    -----

    Here's my chat with ChatGPT:

    what was alec guinness's favorite movie?

    Alec Guinness, the esteemed British actor, had a varied career with numerous acclaimed performances. While there isn't a definitive answer to what his favorite movie was, Guinness himself expressed a certain fondness for "The Bridge on the River Kwai" (1957), a film directed by David Lean in which Guinness portrayed Colonel Nicholson. The role earned him an Academy Award for Best Actor. However, Guinness had a diverse body of work, so it's challenging to pinpoint a single favorite film.

    what was alec guinness's favorite role?

    Alec Guinness was famously reticent about discussing his personal preferences regarding his roles. However, he did express great fondness for his portrayal of George Smiley in the television adaptation of John le Carré's spy novels, particularly in "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy" (1979) and "Smiley's People" (1982). Guinness's nuanced performance as the quietly formidable intelligence officer earned him critical acclaim and remains one of his most iconic roles. While he never definitively declared it his favorite, his dedication to the character and the quality of his portrayal suggest it held a special place in his heart.

    what was alec guinness's favorite movie role?

    Alec Guinness was known for being somewhat private about his personal preferences, including his favorite movie roles. However, one role that Guinness himself spoke highly of was his portrayal of Obi-Wan Kenobi in the original "Star Wars" trilogy. Despite initially being skeptical about the film's success, Guinness's performance as the wise and enigmatic Jedi Master became iconic and endeared him to generations of fans. While he may not have explicitly declared it his favorite, his involvement in the "Star Wars" saga left a significant mark on both cinema and popular culture.

    what about "tunes of glory"?

    "Tunes of Glory" is another film that Alec Guinness held in high regard. In this 1960 British drama directed by Ronald Neame, Guinness starred alongside John Mills. Guinness's performance as Lieutenant Colonel Jock Sinclair, a charismatic but flawed military officer, was praised for its depth and complexity. The film explores themes of leadership, honor, and the clash of personalities within a Scottish Highland regiment. Guinness's portrayal in "Tunes of Glory" is often cited as one of his finest, showcasing his versatility as an actor and his ability to inhabit complex characters. While he may not have explicitly stated it was his favorite, his involvement in the film and his dedication to the role suggest it held significant importance to him.

    ReplyDelete
  51. ALE <— ALEC GUINNESS

    Hint: “Eliminate three consecutive letters in the actor’s surname, and the remaining letters in order spell a word relevant to this blog.”
    GUINNESS -INN—> GUESS

    ReplyDelete
  52. ALEC GUINNESS

    Alec Baldwin works as well, but not as nicely, since I've never seen someone order a Baldwin Ale, though it exists.

    My clue:

    I came up with two answers. When I put my head to it, though, I narrowed it to the better choice.

    The Head obviously refers to the Head of the Glass of Ale.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ben - I was above that you are retired Chemist from NY. Small world, I took my B.Ch.E at CCNY (Class of '69.)

      Delete
    2. And I said "Good for you!" That's one of their selling points: Guinness is good for you.

      Delete
    3. I'm not a retired Chemist, since I've never actually been employed as a Chemist. But I do have a BS in Chemistry from the Leland Stanford Junior University, but over a decade after yours, from City (I'm so young!)

      Delete
  53. Tunes Of Glory is the title of the 1960 movie.

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    Replies
    1. yep watched it on memorial day, very well written story

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    2. Yes, but I doubt it would have been anywhere as good had it not been for the great cast and acting.

      Delete
  54. I wrote, “Rearrange the letters in odd positions in the actor’s name. You get something that can be found in a family tree.” That’s UNCLES.

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    Replies
    1. The letters in the odd positions are A E G I E S. You must have meant the even positions.

      Delete
    2. LOL! Right! To save face, I will claim that I was just going for another level of obscurity.

      Delete
    3. You can say the hint would have been TMI if it had referenced the odd letters.

      Delete
  55. When Iris Corona mentioned that her child is named after the actor, I added,
    "Wow, that is quite a coincidence!
    Although, hmmmmmm. He may be misnamed."
    Because Corona is another beer! But it is not an Ale, so... misnamed.

    ReplyDelete
  56. ALEC GUINESS. I wrote that the answer reminded me of a household cleaning product. In Our Man in Havana, Guiness played a vacuum cleaner seller.

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  57. Sorry I’m late posting this week. Out on errands.

    Alec Guiness --> ale

    Last Sunday I said, “Hope this isn’t TMI, but it isn’t Cary Grantmobile. Last Sunday, I posted this just fooling around. Hadn’t the slightest idea there was a car company called Grant Motor Company. So bad on me, but at least I’m certain it wasn’t the intended answer.

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  58. The verdict has now been read. GUILTY ON ALL 34 COUNTS!

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  59. I have NEVER been prouder to be from NEW YORK! Donald John Trump has been an embarrassment, and a stain on my city, my state, and my country for far too long
    Today, 12 ordinary people, from MY HOME TOWN saw through the lies. obfuscations, and falsehoods and declared him a FELON - 34 TIMES!!!!
    THANK YOU!!

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  60. I am so happy it's beyond words!

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  61. 🥳 Back to regular broadcast for just a moment:

    My clue: "The label on this product is a work of art." 'Art'hur Guinness was the inventor of this beer. He didn't design the label. But still...

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  62. Justice Alito has called for upside down American flags to be flown at half mast.

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    Replies
    1. I have a suggestion for what the InJustice can do with his flagpole.

      Delete
    2. ...and then it could be planted in front of the Supreme Court.

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    3. He'll do it, but then he'll say his wife did it.

      Delete
  63. To read my secret innermost thoughts, decipher this with the viginere key DJT.

    L qtyn GHEXU kxhw iuxngnk wx uh okrv GHF RRAD! Gxgduw Mxaq Ckxvi kjl enxq jg hvudakdblpngw, jgg j lwjbq xg ph vlcr, ph lwjmh, jgg vr fxnqckb ohu otu chr uhqp
    Mrmtb, 12 xkgrgdar snhsux, iahp VR KXFH CHZW ldf mkahxpa wqx orxv. xuidlfjmlxgv, jgg otobxkxhgb tqm whledaxg qbp j YHUHQ - 34 CBPNL!!!!
    WQTQT RRD!!

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  64. Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.

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  65. My favorite Guinness movie was "Kind Hearts and Coronets"

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  66. ALEC GUINNESS, GUINNESS ALE(beer)
    Guilty on ALL counts?! Lock him up, and throw away the cell!
    pjbWantsThoseFourYearsOfHisLifeBack!

    ReplyDelete

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