Sunday, August 19, 2018

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Aug 19, 2018): Part of a Complete Breakfast

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Aug 19, 2018): Part of a Complete Breakfast:
Q: Think of a brand name you might see on your breakfast table. Change one letter to a Y and rearrange the result to get a familiar two-word phrase that names something else you might see on your breakfast table. What phrase is this?
It could be Grape Jell-O® but Grape Jelly doesn't involve any rearrangement.

Edit: My hint was about not being scrambled which is what you would need in order to see the egg yolks.
A: KELLOGG'S-L+Y = EGG YOLKS

216 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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  2. This puzzle is just the antidote to last week's challenge.

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  3. Unused clues for the on air challenge this week.

    On-air challenge: Every answer is a madeup two-word phrase. Add the letter F in front of the first word to get the second word to answer the clue.

    8. Correct amount of horror →
    9. Trip on an airplane with less baggage →
    10. One having a big meal on a spring holiday →

    As usual don't post the answers and give everyone a chance to solve.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Example for the on air challenge.
      Less than usual stream of water --> low flow

      Delete
    2. I don't recall hearing "4. Employs electrical safeguards", but it was early here.
      Bonus puzzles:
      11. Problem with legislation →
      12. Secure the sheep →
      13. Weak fire →
      14. Effort to retrieve type of artwork →
      15. Considerations for thespians →
      16. One who won't lend enough money →
      17. Clothing for the stones, rolling or otherwise →
      18. Skywalker's unusual events →
      19. Drops bouquet into casket, say →

      Delete
    3. Thanks, Mort Canard, for posting these regularly.
      eco, does yout #14 take liberties, or am I barking up the wrong tree?
      More Bonus Puzzles:
      1. Response to "How many fingers are on your left hand?"
      2. Isn't feelin' woozy
      3. What's revealed when you turn over the winning card
      4. Response from Fifi the poodle when her faithful dogfriend proposes marriage
      5. Otophobia?

      LegoWhoWondersIfMrMuskIsACrook

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    4. Lego,
      You are more than welcome.
      Eco's #14 is a fairly specific type of artwork. Took me a bit to figure that one out.

      Delete
    5. Lego: now I'm curious what you are thinking for my #14. I guess I must wait until Thursday. Kudos on yours, especially #4.

      Delete
    6. Answers to the four unused on air challenge clues.
      4. Employs electrical safeguards → Uses Fuses
      7. Correct amount of horror → Right Fright
      8. Trip on an airplane with less baggage → Light Flight
      9. One having a big meal on a spring holiday → Easter Feaster

      Delete
  4. Color me curious about how many correct replies this week.

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  5. I had a one in a million encounter with the two word phrase this week. And while the Society To Repeal Anagram Puzzles cannot endorse this kind of puzzle, it was pretty good.

    Congrats Lego and SuperZee.

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    Replies
    1. You beat me to it, eco. After Will Shortz informed me he was using my puzzle (the first anagram puzzle of mine he has used, by the way) I had drafted a note of apology to Mendo Jim, you and all stout-hearted members of PRATS? TRAPS? SPRAT? PARTS? TARPS?... STRAP!
      Thanks to you, 68Charger and all others who have/will have given me props (or constructively critical "anti-props"). I do predict there will be around "1,000 correct entries" for my puzzle, however.
      As for feinstee's curiosity about "correct replies" for Will's 2-week challenge, I thought I heard Lulu say "there were about 300 enties." So I am still curious also.
      Incidentally, SuperZee asked an excellent question on-air about how Will's parents reacted to his choice of pursuing a degree in enigmatology. (Mom was supportive, Dad was all like "Okay, get it out of your system, then get a real job."

      LegoWhoNotesThat"ecoarchitect"AnagramsTo"EroticCachet"ButThat"MendoJim"Doesn'tReallyAnagramToAnything

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    2. Thanks..but I was perhaps to cagey in my original comment.

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    3. The question had special relevence to me. My parents circle of friends included lawyers, accountants, doctors, teachers and businessmen. When I told them I wanted to study Chemical Engineering, I got a blank stare, followed by, “What does a Chemical Engineer do?”

      Delete
    4. Lego: Congratulations on your puzzle being chosen for this week!! That is pretty cool.
      After last week's puzzle, I was kind of puzzled out! I was so close to the answer and, even saw "venus" & "avenues" but didn't put two and two together. It was just a little too busy. I am impressed by anyone who correctly answered it, congrats again to SuperZee!!!
      Your puzzle, this week, was fun and a good one to boot. 

      Delete
  6. Interesting. I followed a false hunch which nevertheless led me to the answer.

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    Replies
    1. On my fifth Bloody Mary I realized that wasn't the answer.

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    2. JELLY seemed like a promising Y-word, and it made me consider Kellogg's. When the JELLY part didn't work out EGG YOLKS appeared.

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    3. I was stuck on GRAPE NUTS and TANG SYRUP which made no sense but I thought I was close.

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    4. I also started with Y words - jelly, maple syrup, pastry, soy milk - to name a few. Kellogg's came up fast when I considered brands, and egg yolks derived easily from that.

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    5. I also tried for a while to make something out of DAILY NEWS.

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  7. Question - are we to assume, that bc WS said that the result is a 2-word phrase, the brand name is a 1-word brand name? Or could it be a 2-word brand name?

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    1. Deborah,
      The number of words in the brand name could be any number.

      LegoWhoHasAContainerOf"ICan'tBelieveIt'sNotButter"(SixWords)OnHisBreakfastTable(WhichWhenYouChangeAn"N"ToA"Y"AnagramsTo"Bible,Creation,Eve:It'sNutty!"

      Delete
  8. How may of Lego's puzzles have now been used on the NPR broadcast?
    Can we ask him to republish them incrementally?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for asking, SuperZee.

      1. Name a well-known U.S. city in two words. Replace each of those words with a word that rhymes with it, and you'll name a large sea creature in two words. What is it? (4/9/17)

      2. Take the singular and plural forms of a particular noun. Remove the first two letters of the singular form and you'll name a country. Remove one letter from inside the plural form to name another country. What words and countries are these? (12/3/17)

      3. Take the start of the name of a country and the end of that country's capital. Put the parts together, one after the other, and you'll get the last name of a character in a very popular movie. It's a character everyone knows. Who is it? (2/18/18)

      4. Think of a well-known commercial name in nine letters. Change both the fourth and ninth letters to X's, and you'll get two other familiar commercial names, one after the other. What are they? (6/24/180

      5. Think of a brand name you might see on your breakfast table. Change one letter to a Y and rearrange the result to get a familiar two-word phrase that names something else you might see on your breakfast table. What phrase is this? (8/19/18)

      LegoNotesThatWillShortzHasAlsoUsedMultiplePuzzlesBy"cranberry"(PatrickJ.Berry)AndPerhapsOtherBlainesvilliansOfWhomLegoIsNotAware

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    2. Great puzzles, Lego! And thanks for the shoutout!

      Delete
  9. With all the BS coming from the Oval Office these days thanks to our feared leader, I’m glad this week’s offering is more straightforward than last week’s.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Our master blog administrator seems to have found a way to delete posts without leaving a trace.

      Delete
    2. Interestingly the post in question reappeared several hours later and has since been “deleted by a blog administrator.”

      Delete
    3. Hey, Lorenzo, writing as a fellow blog administrator of the PEOTS blog, it’s fairly easy to accidentally delete a comment forever. And, once it’s gone, it’s really gone. . .

      Delete
    4. I accidentally clicked a checkbox which did a permanent delete on the first comment. But the original commentor decided to post again so the second time I did the normal removal by an administrator.

      Delete
    5. I agree, though. The comment needed to go.

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    6. Blaine and WW – Thanks for the explanation. However, I’m glad my ignorance in this matter allowed me to post my hint!

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    7. See, Lorenzo, ignorance is bliss.

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    8. If that were true we would be the happiest country on earth.

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    9. Speaking of which, take a look at the following astute and frighteningly plausible scenario. https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2018/08/trump-n-word-tape-how-the-country-would-react-day-by-day-if-such-a-recording-came-to-light.html

      Delete
    10. So true! So true! Idiots see what idiots want to see.

      Delete
    11. And if you want a really fun trip down memory lane visit https://theweeklylist.org/. It's a "Dear Diary" for the country, compiled by Amy Siskind (who has a controversial past), recounting the flops and foibles of this regime without regimen.

      I'd think it insane to try and read the whole thing, but you can just randomly pick a week, for example, Week 40 (one year ago) begins:

      This week’s list is not the longest, but it is certainly the most heartbreaking. Trump’s comments on Charlottesville legitimized the worst of us, and spawned a watershed moment for our country. His remarks were met with widespread condemnation and reactions, and precipitated a mass exodus of corporate CEOs from Trump’s American Manufacturing Council, wiping away any lingering doubts that Trump’s goals were ever truly linked to job creation. For the first time, real questions about fitness for office were raised out loud by both sides.

      She then lists 106(!) events in that week (and "this ... is not the longest") that most would find appalling and horrifying in normal times.

      A lot of weekly narratives begin "This was the worst week..." You'll remember almost all of the entries, and then realize how long and strange this trip has been.

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  11. Nice job this morning, SuperZee!

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  12. The brand name also shows up in an industry far removed from the breakfast table.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Lulu reported "about 300 responses," with no mention of correctness.
    It will surprise none of you that I think this number was inflated to cover up very low participation in a seriously lame two-part puzzle.
    It is interesting that none of the discussion here last week included the term "narrow letters." Don't feel bad, Google had never heard the term either until this morning from Will Shortz; at least it is the first hit I found.
    Has the "three letters from a planet name" answer folks all been won over?
    Now a nice anagram to ignore.

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    Replies
    1. Have heard of short, tall, and hang down letters but never "narrow" letters. Somewhere in the back of my head I have also heard of Ascenders and Descenders.

      Delete
  14. You won't have to _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ to find a solution to this puzzle. I won't use the verb because I know my comment will then be removed by the blog administrator!

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  15. Last puzzle I asked about will’s universe-ity schooling. This week I’m interested in whether he has a graduate degree.

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    Replies
    1. Alums of a certain school have an advantage this week.

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    2. And that school is the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern.

      Delete
  16. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  17. There’s a “narrow” word with a tie-in to this week’s puzzle.

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  18. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  19. Replies
    1. Musical clue: Ain't Gonna Study War No More. Ironic, in a way, maybe.

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    2. Ironic---or just making a better cliche?

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  20. Chrome seems the best option for visiting Blainesville this weekend.

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  22. SuperZee,

    Sounded like you had fun. Congrats!

    Did WS run all twelve of the clues past you and then edit it down or did you only get the ones that aired?

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    Replies
    1. Will gave me all twelve clues. The ones that didn't make it to the broadcast were all ones I answered correctly. The only one that stumped me was the "LACKS/FLACKS" one - and that was aired.
      I'm puzzled (!) by the editing process and wonder if others who have been on the show had similar experiences.

      Delete
    2. SZ,
      Thanks!
      I seem to remember one of our fellow bloggers relate that got all the clues and then had the airing be edited down to fit the time slot.

      Delete
    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    4. When I had my moment of glory (Rio Games) all answers ended in -rio - I missed two of twenty - lothario and impresario - two words I never use (and who does, really? Hey look, lothario comes up as a spelling error here!). They aired the lothario error but not the impresario error. They aired only about 10 of the twenty questions. It was harder for me being taped than it was listening to the program on Sunday. On Sunday when I listened to myself, I got every answer correctly and quickly, even lothario.

      So congrats to SuperZee. And by the way, Weekend Edition lapel pins don't sell for much on Ebay.

      Delete
    5. I love the eBay comment. Did you try CraigsList?

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    6. I got $100. cash for my pin last year.

      Delete
  23. Wasn't there a movie about shrinking the kids?

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  24. You're a mean one, Mr. Shortz...

    Maybe I seemed a bit confused before but Solution...I've got you pegged!

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  25. My tea cozy keeps my tea warm while I eat a bowl of CRZE OAT cereal.

    As Dwayne the Insane Crane--think Toucan Sam but loopier or Sonny the Cuckoo but cuckooier--says in the commercials: "I'm just crazy about CRZE OATS!"

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like to drizzle CRC (certified red clover) HONEY on my CORN CHEX.

      Delete
  26. Finally I got this one, thinking of things on the breakfast table that have Y in them. I had missed out on the brand name because of the conflict between general and specific.

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  27. Vinyl from Colin Hay or Ivan Doroschuk will only get you close to the answer.

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  28. My cereal didn't even have a chance to get soggy before I figured this puzzle out! Admittedly, I work in tandem and rarely attempt the puzzle alone.

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  29. in paris, you’d be joan’s foe, especially after a strike-out.

    ReplyDelete
  30. That poor lady who fell off the cruise ship in the Adriatic, has been found and is safely back on ship. Unfortunately, she is suffering from being in the water and the sun for over 12 hours. 

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There's something, um, fishy, in that story. It's hard to just fall off a modern luxury liner, unless she was doing something really stupid (selfie?). I'm guessing the Aegean is very salty, like the Mediterranean, so floating is, er, fathomable.

      We shall sea.

      Delete
    2. This reference provides a great opportunity for a regular poster here to flesh out the story of what must have been an interesting time in his life.

      Delete
    3. Yes, that seems awfully suspicious regarding the circumstances. That selfie idea might be right!

      Delete
    4. Goldie Hawn, “Overboard”.

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    5. Was lucky ompared to the woman who got pulled under by an alligator on Hilton Head Island while walking her dog.
      https://articles.al.com/news/index.ssf/2018/08/alligator_in_south_carolina_ki.amp

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    6. Sometimes life just doesn't seem fair. Common sense should have prevailed!

      Delete
    7. Why was the woman walking the alligator's dog?

      Delete
  31. There seems to be a hierarchy of Sunday Puzzle sources, with the best coming from Blainesville, the next from random contributors, next from the PM's inside circle and last from you-know-who.
    Thanks for this clever one, Lego, though it may include an argument for place mats.
    I wonder who decided to include SZ's only mistake.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. I think Blainesvillains have a real advantage this week.

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    3. Thanks, Mendo Jim. I'll take "clever" as a compliment. I agree with you that anagram puzzles tend to be run into the ground by puzzle-makers, me included. But their siren-song lure sure can be intoxicating.
      I regret that I did not word this week's puzzle differently to make it a wee bit tougher -- for example, by editing the first sentence ("Think of a brand name you might see on your breakfast table") to read rather something like "Think of a word or words you might see while sitting at your breakfast table..."
      Thanks also to cranberry for his kudos on my puzzles (in an earlier post, above).
      Thanks to all who I may have neglected to thank by name.

      LabelDogma

      Delete
  32. I found this puzzle to be a lot easier to solve when you spell the brand name correctly :) Anyhow, congrats to both of you for last weekend!

    ReplyDelete
  33. It’s even easier if you sing the jingle...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. T-a-r-z-a-n. J-a-n-e. M-o-n-k-e-y.

      What? Oh, sing the jingle!?

      With a nod to Emily Litella and the great Gilda Radner.

      Delete
    2. Welcome to the Jingle, er a Jangle, er uh....
      Bums and Posers

      Delete
  34. Replies
    1. I'd sure like to know what really went on behind the scenes during "The Apprentice". That would be very revealing! You know there had to be some serious editing to get the finished product on the air.

      Delete
  35. Grape Jell-O ® and grape jelly is a rearrangement if you switch the L's.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I suppose you could swap the Es too. 😁

      Delete
    2. Why Grape? Why not Strawwberry? Or any one of a number of flavors?

      I would venture to say that when Lego constructed the puzzle, he had a more elegant answer in mind.

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    3. Strawberry Jell-O for breakfast? Grape maybe, but strawberry is just too weird! Plus I usually have strawberry jam, not jelly. 😉

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    4. I thought perhaps you chose grape for a reason.

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    5. It was probably just grapeshot fired over the bow.

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    6. Yes. The retorts are flying now.

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    7. eco, “about SDB’s post?” In other words, ri:poste? ;-)

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    8. curses, narrow once more. . .

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    9. Épée

      >>>

      https://deadspin.com/epee-is-for-losers-1785099786

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    10. A little Touché this evening, huh?

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    11. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    12. But where would crosswords be without épée? Right, Will?

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  36. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    Replies
    1. jan, your hint leads right to the answer.

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    2. Aw, man, 2 weeks in a row. I really thought that was OK. Googled all the keywords and didn't get anything close to the answer. Sorry!

      Delete
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  38. Grape jelly on saltine crackers should only be served with chili.

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  39. Another answer that does not require rearranging: McMuffin, my muffin.

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  40. When solving this puzzle I wondered which came first, the brand name or two word phrase. One more sunrise and we might find out.

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  41. My best days start with breakfast. So do my worst ones. I never skip breakfast.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "Kellogg's, because your best days start with breakfast."

      Delete
  42. If Paul Manafort gets pardoned would that prove that Donald Trump is true to his convictions?

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  43. Melania calls Mike Pence, Barron, his little friend and Donnie, down for a hearty breakfast, ASAP!


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Looks more like (from left to right) Mike Pence, Betsy DeVos, Ajit Pai, Rick Gates, and Steve Bannon (the one with the collar) scramble for cover as the Orange Volcano finally realizes what's happening.

      Delete
    2. Eco - I like that better! At the current rate, that Orange Volcano may explode any day now!

      Delete
  44. Apparently I haven’t been eating nutritious enough breakfasts, because I just got the answer

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  45. Will someone please tell me why it is illegal to use champagne funds for personal use?

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  46. Totally off topic but I am at a loss. All of a sudden my computer is not showing images on some pages. Netflix, Facebook, Teton NP websites. Others are fine. It will not do a system restore. I will have to take it in and pay big bucks to have someone help me. Any ideas? I checked for malware and viruses. It came on suddenly.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. First tip - try a different browser. I don't know which browser you're using, but try all three of the major ones: IE/Edge, Chrome, and Firefox. If there's a difference, then it's your browser. Second tip - clear your cache. Third tip - restore your browser's settings to the default. Hope that helps.

      Delete
    2. I think it is my adblocker in chrome gone haywire. It never caused what is happening before but everything works if I disable it.

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    3. Can you uninstall Chrome & then reinstall it? Just wondering.

      Delete
  47. A little sub puzzle to work. Take another well known brand name, owned by the intended brand in this weeks puzzle, which is something else you might have for breakfast. Change the last letter to s, and you have the same food in the intended two word phrase in this weeks puzzle. What brand is it, and the food item? No answers until after three eastern time today.

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    Replies
    1. The cold never bothered me anyway

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    2. Well, I was going for Eggo waffles, a brand owned by Kellogg’s. Change the o to an s, and you get eggs. The answer to the second part. My first try at a puzzle creation.

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    3. "The cold never bothered me anyway" The last line to the song "Let it go", or Leggo for short.

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  48. After spending a lot of time trying to figure this one out, I finally got it. My first instinct was correct concerning the product. Figuring out the name was tougher. I hate it when I spend a lot of time trying to solve the Sunday Puzzle and don't get it and then I rue that I even tried to get it.

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  49. KELLOGG’S - K + Y = EGG YOLKS

    “MC, you are late to the breakfast table today. . .“ >>> you have EGG on your face.


    “This puzzle is just the antidote to last week's challenge.“ EGGS have been used as an antidote to metal poisoning.


    “There’s a “narrow” word with a tie-in to this week’s puzzle.” Apparently Dr. John Kellogg, co-inventor of the cereal flake, really loved enemas, giving himself half a dozen or more enemas a day. >>>

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/style/1994/10/23/an-enema-of-the-people/6d510d59-4a93-403c-a60f-2b3605deac57/?utm_term=.2bf012f03185 

    “I thought perhaps you chose grape for a reason.” and “Did you really post that?” refers to Grape Nuts cereal, manufactured by Post.

    "See, it's all about equity equations, k?" refers to Special K, a Kellogg's product.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Have you checked your spelling?

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    3. Did you miss my comment, "Vinyl from Colin Hay or Ivan Doroschuk will only get you close to the answer."
      Colin Hay is the singer for Men At Work (Who can it be Now & Down Under) . Ivan Doroschuk is the singer for Men Without Hats (Safety Dance). So the commonality is "Men".

      In this case vinyl refers to a record album.

      So Album-Men --> Albumen or egg whites which is about as close to egg yolks as you can get.

      Delete
    4. Re: editing >>>

      My phone keyboard is slowly messing up. When I press L, it gives me a K. I can only write words with a U in them by choosing the suggested words. Any thoughts on that issue, (aside from getting a new phone as the phone is ancient—3 years old?)

      {It has made some interesting texts when I ask friends and family if they had fin or if they enjoyed the pins. We decided that fineral must be the burial ceremony for a fish.}

      It’s the one time I am glad for spelling suggestions. Thanks, in advance, for your keyboard expertise.

      Delete
    5. There are 26 letters in our alphabet. Why is it necessary to have all of them? Can't you get by without the L and the U? Americans want to own everything. This entitlement must stop.

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    6. It’s startling how many times I need U. ;-)

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    7. That's what the stud ram said.

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    8. I can't decide if:
      a) I'm cowed by that comment,
      b) feeling sheepish, or
      c) if its just a lot of bull

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    9. What have you herd from others so far?

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    10. Mostly people tooting their own horns.

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    11. Be careful you don't get fleeced.

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    12. It’s just a lot of bill? Bell? Ball? Boll? ;-)

      Re: enemas >>> With friends like Kellogg’s, who needs enemas?

      How would you find the time for that many enemas in a day? At the end of the day, one would surely be pooped.

      Delete
    13. It would be a never ending task.

      Delete
    14. 'I' before 'E' except after 'C'-
      We sure live in a weird society.

      Delete
  50. Kellogg’s --> egg yolks

    Earlier this week I said, “I found this puzzle to be a lot easier to solve when you spell the brand name correctly.” I didn’t check and just assumed that Kellogg’s was spelled with one “g.” Things didn’t go well :)

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  51. KELLOGG’S -> EGG YOLKS

    > Musical clue: Ain't Gonna Study War No More. Ironic, in a way, maybe.

    The Kellogg-Briand Pact of 1928 was intended to provide for "the renunciation of war as an instrument of national policy." U.S. Secretary of State Frank Kellogg (no relation to the cereal company, as far as I can tell) was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Kellogg’s is based down by the riverside in Battle Creek, of course.

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  52. KELLOGG’S – L + Y = EGG YOLKS

    Regarding my posts:
    “Snap” was a reference to Snap, Crackle and Pop (Rice Krispies advertising).
    I asked Lego to republish his chosen puzzles incrementally in the hope he’d publish them in, “serial,” form.
    M. W. Kellogg, now part of KBR, was a major engineering and construction company, primarily focused in the petroleum industry.

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  53. The Brand Name: KELLOGG'S.

    Change an L to a Y & rearrange to yield: EGG YOLKS.

    My hint: It wasn't SNAP; it was POP from the Kellogg's Rice-Krispies Mascots.

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  54. Rip-off puzzle:
    Name another maker of breakfast foods. Change a letter to a “Y” and rearrange to name something else that might be associated with breakfast foods

    ReplyDelete

  55. I wrote, “I had missed out on the brand name because of the conflict between general and specific.” I tried every _cereal_ name I could think of instead of trying the _manufacturer_ name.

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  56. Kel(l)ogg's + y = egg yolks

    I had a one in a million encounter with the two word phrase this week. A week ago I added a hard boiled egg to a dinner salad, and the egg had a double yolk. According to the all-true internet about 1/1000 eggs have double yolks, not that unusual. For lunch the next day I had another salad with another hard boiled egg, and it was also a double yolk!

    the Society To Repeal Anagram Puzzles cannot endorse this kind of puzzle - I suspect Repeel would have been blog administered.

    Chrome seems the best option for visiting Blainesville this weekend. I was in (what I think is) Blaine's home town last Saturday, and it was hot enough to fry an egg on your car. Did a hot engine help? Would chrome heat better?

    I think Blainesvillains have a real advantage this week. We know Joseph Young as "legolambda", and one of Kellogg's products is Eggo's frozen waffles (ever have one?). Blainesvillains acknowledges the promotion of petty theft in early "L'eggo my Eggo" commercials, though I remember this one.


    On air bonus puzzles:

    11. Problem with legislation → law flaw
    12. Secure the sheep → lock flock
    13. Weak fire → lame flame
    14. Effort to retrieve type of artwork → etching fetching
    15. Considerations for thespians → actor's factors
    16. One who won't lend enough money → under funder
    17. Clothing for the stones, rolling or otherwise → rock's frocks
    18. Skywalker's unusual events → Luke's flukes
    19. Drops bouquet into casket, say → lowers flowers

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    1. I was not able to solve eco's #14 "Effort to retrieve type of artwork → etching fetching". I was hung-up and obsessed with the wrongheaded notion that something like "Rescue fresco" was eco's intended answer.
      Thanks again to Mort Canard for his NPR on-air puzzle postings, and to eco for his bonus riff-off puzzles.

      Answers To "Riffing Off eco" My Bonus Puzzles:
      1. Response to "How many fingers are on your left hand?"
      I'VE FIVE
      2. Isn't feelin' woozy
      AINT FAINT
      3. What's revealed when you turn over the winning card
      ACE FACE
      4. Response from Fifi the poodle when her faithful dogfriend proposes marriage
      "I DO, FIDO!"
      5. Otophobia?
      EAR FEAR

      LegoWhoUnlikeFido'sFianceeWasBarkingUpTheWrongTree

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    2. Lego,
      Thought that with your "barking up the wrong tree" comment you had "Fetching" and were not sure of it.

      I enjoyed your bonus puzzles this week as well as Eco's. I've Five and I Do, Fido were definitely worth a giggle when solved.

      Delete
  57. Brand name - KELLOG’S. Change and L to a Y, and rearrange to get EGG YOLKS.

    in paris, you’d be joan’s foe, especially after a strike-out.

    In Paris (French) egg yolks may be rendered as jaunes d’oeuf (literally the yellows of an egg).
    Joan’s is a sound-alike for jaunes. The word “you” can be a sound-alike for the letter “u” Add “u” plus the letter “d” (from you’d) to foe, rearrange to get oeufs.

    The word “especially” for Special and K for strike-out, as it is rendered on baseball scorecards , for the product Special K, as a hint for Kellogg’s.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. . . . rearrange to get d’oeuf.

      Delete
    2. Not a reference to this guy’s 8 strikeouts?! https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Kellogg

      Delete
  58. I did come across this when looking around for a Jonny Quest link!

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  59. Kellogg’s Egg Yolks. My clue was what came first the brand or the two word second part, obviously referring to the chicken or the egg dilemma. And one more sunrise, referring to a breakfast order, and sunny side up.

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  60. Thinking of the Kellogg School of Management I referred to Blaine as our “master blog administrator.

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  61. Lorenzo - that was also the purpose of my asking if Will has a graduate degree.
    My other clue was reference to the Oval (egg shaped) Office. (Home of egghead?)

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  62. KELLOGG'S, EGG YOLKS
    When I complimented Legolambda, I used the word "great". This word was also used(quite frequently)by Tony the Tiger, the mascot for Kellogg's Frosted Flakes. Of course the way he said it, it would've been spelled with more than one R(in fact, quite a few R's), but if I'd pretended to make an "accidental" typo, it would've been too much of a giveaway.
    My musical clue regarding The Police referred to "Synchronicity II"(1983), which features the following lyric:
    "We have to shout above the din of our Rice Krispies/We can't hear anythin' at all." Rice Krispies is also one of the many delicious cereals made by Kellogg's.
    My favorite, most ambiguous clue I managed to get away with this week was my use of the nonsensical phrase "making a better cliche". It's actually the best anagram I could find for BATTLE CREEK, MICHIGAN, where Kellogg's headquarters are located. Amateur anagrammer that I am, I must say I'm kinda proud of that one.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. cranberry,
      If anyone is an expert at "making a better cliche" it is you, cranberry.

      LegoWhoThinksPatrickIsAMasterAnagrammer

      Delete
  63. Remember when Omarosa was the big headline in all the news?

    Me neither.

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  64. I was thinking Newport and wet pony but ya'll probably don't know what that's about.

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  65. Poor John McCain, his family has announced that he will discontinue treatment for his cancer. 
    I have disagreed with his politics quite a lot over the years, but I have always respected him. 
    I will always remember the news clips of him and his fellow POW's finally returning home from Hanoi. That flight home aboard the C-141, called the "Hanoi Taxi", must have been a flight to remember!

    John McCain will be missed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. He won't be missed by me. I have always disagreed with his politics and despise him as a person. He even referred to his wife publicly with the C word. I have met some who served with him who told me stories about him and how they too despise him.

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    2. SDB - Wow, didn't know all that!

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    3. McCain's image exceeded his reality. I'll give him some credit for stopping the ACA repeal, and for bringing years of hilarity with his VP pick.

      Different topic: perhaps this article helps explain why we were forced to read Shakespeare in school.

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    4. It sure will be ugly when he goes, and it won't be soon enough!! That author is right, he won't go gracefully.

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    5. I'd like John McCain to have the space to pass peacefully.

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    6. I do think it is interesting that McCain has asked that Trump not attend his funeral, but does want Bush & Obama there. It will be a lonely day for DJT.

      Delete
    7. McCain's image went up a few points in my mind.

      Trump has already tweeted "I prefer to go to the funerals of people who aren't dead."

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    8. eco, are you changing your name to Randy Rainbow 🌈? ;-)

      Delete
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