Sunday, August 26, 2018

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Aug 26, 2018): Musical Body Parts

NPR Sunday Puzzle (Aug 26, 2018): Musical Body Parts:
Q: Think of a well-known musician whose last name contains a body part. The musician has a single-word nickname that anagrams to a different body part. Who is this musician, and what is the nickname?
The longer version of the musician's nickname also contains a body part.

Edit: Satchmo is short for "satchel mouth".
A: LOUIS ARMSTRONG --> SATCHMO --> STOMACH

195 comments:

  1. Here's my standard reminder... don't post the answer or any hints that could lead directly to the answer (e.g. via a chain of thought, or an internet search) before the deadline of Thursday at 3pm ET. If you know the answer, click the link and submit it to NPR, but don't give it away here.

    You may provide indirect hints to the answer to show you know it, but make sure they don't give the answer away. You can openly discuss your hints and the answer after the Thursday deadline. Thank you.

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    1. In addition, please avoid gender pronouns (he/she) since the gender of the musician isn't provided.

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  2. It’s so good when you solve the puzzle quickly.

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  3. Solved before WS repeated the puzzle, though (as I noted at the end of last week's thread) the musician's name, as stated, has some controversy.

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    1. And to add to Blaine's hint, another musician associated with this week's answer also contains a body part.

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    2. One more thing, a variant nickname for this week's answer is a synonym for something this person might do with a different body part.

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  4. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    2. It is pretty easy to figure that out Shyra.

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    3. Bummer that I always seem to miss out on the give-a-way clues before they are deleted.

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  5. This musician shares a last name with a famous non-musician whose first name is a homonym for something a body can do.

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    1. very apropos for today. --Margaret G.

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    2. Also the musician shares a last name with a famous non-musician whose first name is an anagram for something you do to your body routinely. - Jeff B.

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    3. Also, the musician shares a last name with a superhero whose first name is something something you should do to your body regularly.

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    5. Calling that person a super hero is a bit of a stretch, isn’t it? And yes, way too many clues. One of them - not this one - led me right to the answer.

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    6. Let's not provide too many easy clues here, or else Blaine might hit the ceiling.

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    7. Ow, that hurt my feelings having my comment rubbed out.

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  6. You'll get no lip service from me on this one. I solved it right away.

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  7. The initials reflect the origins. --Margaret G.

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  8. Think of two other well-known musicians with single-word names. One of these names is a physical sensation. The other can be rearranged to name something that might cause this sensation.

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  9. Not to brag too much, but I solved this one in two minutes flat. It happens once in a blue moon.

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  10. I saw this person perform in person.

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  11. I can think of one country that isn't mourning John McCain today.

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  12. RIP Neil Simon, who no doubt would have written something better.

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  13. To bring up a recent puzzle answer >>> AVENUES . . .

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  14. I solved this one while still in bed hours ago. Quick to solve, but a good puzzle just the same.

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  15. Ok - I was initially thrown by a clue above that I thought referenced a certain other musician whose nickname anagrams to a body part (thankfully not anagramming the “spine”). But now I’ve got it.

    On a side note, I’m looking forward to the exciting start of the US Open tennis tourney. I’ve got two sons who work there as ball boys - hoping they get to work some of the top matches there.

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    1. I too found a famous nickname that anagrams to a body part. Last name doesn't work at all though.

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  16. I misread the puzzle and thought I had the answer right away. Instead of anagramming the nickname, I got a very famous musician whose nickname also includes the name of a body part. Slightly more or less famous, depending on your generation but famous nonetheless.

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    1. I mentioned that musician, by nickname, to my husband.

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  17. All this white-wash BS on the demise of John McCain is more than I can take. Even NPR can't tell the truth. I suggest reading this very well researched and written Rolling Stone article from ten years ago:

    https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/politics-news/john-mccain-make-believe-maverick-202004/

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    1. But but but, he once told a woman that Obama wasn't a Muslim! Showing that being a Muslim is, in his mind, an inherently evil thing.

      Thanks, I had forgotten about that very detailed biography.

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    2. Did you happen to hear the hour long NPR whitewash filled with lies, misrepresentations and exaggerations this evening that completely ignored all the horror this criminal hack legislated to attack the ordinary people of this country he professed to love so much, but trashed? So now younger and future generations will go on to idolize this creep along with the likes of Ronald Reagan. Whatever happened to journalism?

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    3. I turned it off and played "My Life in the Bush of Ghosts", the only album I have that features an actual exorcism set to music.

      I always feel better after that.

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    4. Seems to me that it is a measure of how far our political system has fallen that John McCain is now held up as our best shining example of bipartisan compromise and fairness.

      Yes McCain did on many occasions put Country before party. On many other occasions he was not above taking the low road to get what he wanted or thought politically expedient.

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  18. Replies
    1. Here’s the link:

      https://burningman.org/event/live-webcast/

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  19. I got this one in three minutes, but I adore this musician's work. I started by thinking of the five hottest artists out there and -- end of story.

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  20. Arrivederci Roma (Civitavecchia) in style.

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  21. Blecch, a rearranger, but nearly forgivable.
    Got it easily, with a personal connection helping out.
    Knowledgeable young on-air player!
    saukriver's alternative for last week gets a honorable mention.

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  22. As usual, WW's clues make absolutely no sense to me; I won't reveal (until Thursday) whose clue actually did help me.

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    1. The name Armstrong occurred to me fairly quickly but I didn't think of Louis until I read cranberry's "lip" clue. WW's clues are never helpful; that's just another feature of the Wonderful World in which we live.

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  23. If I put them in my lap, are they my lowhands?

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  24. We temporary homed a kitty one night. The next day we wanted to take him to the shelter... We didn't have a carrier so we put him in the gym gear... It was too much (pun-wise) to let the cat out of the bag.

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  25. I am floored by the number of places the musician's last name shows up.

    Or maybe, I'm just tired.

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  26. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  27. There were no unused clues in the on air challenge this week.

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  28. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  29. Bonus Challenge this week.

    Take the last name of a musical family that plays roughly the same kind of music as the musician that is the answer to this weeks challenge. The Family name meets the NEANDERTHAL EMBARRASS SATURATION CONTEMPTUOUSNESS criteria. (but is not composed exclusively of “narrow” or “short” letters)
    Two members of this family are very well-known to fans of that style of music.
    When you take the first name of the younger musician and insert a letter in it, phonetically you get the first name of a famous 20th century politician.
    When you take the first name of the older musician and insert the letters “D” and “T”, you get, reading left to right the last names of two other 20th century politicians. (One American and one Non-American)

    Who are the two related musicians and the three politicians?

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  30. Here are some bonus challenges with the same rule: in each word or phrase, change two consecutive letters to name a country.
    1) CHORUS
    2) ANGINA
    3) RHONDA
    4) POLLED
    5) AIRWAY
    6) LATINA

    Bonus Puzzle #1: Name a famous American political figure of the past whose last name contains a body part. This person had another title that anagrams to a musician's first and last name. What is the politician's name and title, and the musician's name?

    Bonus Puzzle #2: Name a famous American of the first half of the 20th Century whose last name is phonetically composed of 2 body parts. I keep thinking this was an actual puzzle, but can't find it.

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    1. Correct. Let's keep your powder dry so others could have a chance and hopefully lay awake at night struggling horribly.

      Hold 'til Thursday for the others, K?

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    2. eco - I didn't think she could be the answer as the puzzle specified that the body parts would be phonetic - and I've always heard the name pronounced AIR HEART.

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    3. SZ: you're right; next life I'll word it as name a famous person whose name contains a body part, the remaining letters phonetically name another body part. See you on the other side.

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  31. Aretha sounds like a body part and anagrams to "A Hater." I am filled with wonder.

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  32. Replies
    1. C'est la vie!

      Around here I usually suffer L'esprit de l'escalier right after I hit Publish.

      That perfect witty response is usually a couple of minutes in the future.

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  33. Yesterday and today, at breakfast, I heard the same *very* well-known song by the well-known musician. It’s a sign.

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  34. My friend got this for me. He looks like an Alpine Santa with his crazy beard.

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  35. I think that it was no coincidence that the news of the new trade deal with Mexico was announced today. I think that it was timed to deflect attention from John McCain's death and all its accompanying press coverage. I bet Trump is pretty annoyed that McCain is the center of attention.
    Just sayin'.

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    1. Absolutely. 45 looked annoyed to his back teeth when reporters asked about John McCain at the end of the announcement.

      Trade deal with North Americans, eh? Can we trade 45 for Justin Trudeau? We can call it the U.S. True Dough Deal. True D’oh Deal?

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    2. 68: I did not even consider that until now. I think you are correct about the lack of coincidence.

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    3. I'll put this “preliminary agreement in principle.” (White House words, not mine) right next to that complete denuclearization of North Korea. It's not a deal, there are details to be worked out. NAFTA was a 3 way deal with Canada, and can only be changed with Canada's agreement. Not to mention our Congress, and so far that requires a fillibuster proof Senate. Enrique Peña Nieto needs to get this done before he leaves office in December, as Obrador may not be so willing. Etc., etc.

      Other than that, Mrs Lincoln, everything's just fine.

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    4. Now, I was not the biggest fan of McCain, but I was shocked and kind of embarrassed as an American, when the White House flag was raised to its normal height early this morning. Then, it was lowered back to half mast later in the morning. I would love to hear the background story on all of this.

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    5. Do you really wonder, considering the current occupant???

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    6. BB - Yes, you're right but it seems like every few days DJT just sinks the office to a new low.

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    7. Because it’s always about him:

      https://www.thedailybeast.com/a-new-low-white-house-raises-flag-before-john-mccain-is-laid-to-rest

      It’s sickening. Words like creep much more readily apply to 45.

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    8. WW: Awesome article! Sad, but awesome.

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    9. I wonder how many here understand that for the flag to be flown at half mast it must first be raised to full mast and then lowered.

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    10. So tRump's antics were merely flagellation?

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    11. ...and creating flaghellnation.

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    12. What’s your point, sdb?

      45 behaved like a petulant child ordering the flag raised early this morning. He only caved and had it lowered this afternoon due to pressure from the American Legion and other veterans’ groups.

      It was not a case of raising it to then immediately lower it.

      Once again, 45 could not show respect to someone who served our country because he is a complete and utter spoiled brat.

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    13. Perhaps Trump was Dancing With The Stars & Stripes.

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    14. I am not making a point with that post. I don't understand why anyone would be at all surprised at Trump behaving badly. Both Trump and McCain are "complete and utter spoiled brat"s. To compare anyone against Trump as the benchmark of disgusting behavior is absurd. There are people who actually deserve recognition, but I would have a very hard time trying to name one who is a current member of our national government.

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    15. I have been around long enough that I remember CREEP as the Committe to RE-Elect the President.

      ... and now CREEP is the president!!

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    16. I disagree about McCain. He did serve our country and sustained three broken limbs, at the very least. He deserves recognition.

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    17. You are certainly entitled to your opinion. I don't see why he deserves recognition for crashing more planes than probably any other serviceman in our history, not to mention being the cause of other expensive war planes being lost to his ineptitude on that carrier when he caused the deaths of 134 of his fellow crewmen, not to mention the injuries to more than that. He did not need to lose his plane either. He should have taken evasive action to both save himself and his aircraft, like he was instructed to do in the training he paid little attention to.

      He then became a U.S. Senator and did nothing at all for the people of this country. Not a single thing. Instead he worked to take from the ordinary citizens.

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    18. To me, the biggest difference between McCain and 45 is that McCain realized he was a flawed human. He embraced it. 45 never will.

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    19. There may be some truth to that, but so what? They both are, and were, enormously destructive to our country and the lives of those they were elected to serve. What is the point of arguing over who was more evil, Hitler or Stalin? The results of their actions destroyed the lives of millions.

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    20. McCain served. Trump did not. There’s a wide gulf between them.

      We can agree to disagree.

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    21. I think it may be well for us all to remember the famous quote of Samuel Johnson in 1775:

      "Patriotism is the last refuge of the scoundrel."

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    22. I am no fan of John McCain, he is another weasel (sorry Mustelids) who has shown extraordinary flexibility in his personal beliefs, while displaying absolute rigid tenacity in his own self-promotion.

      Having said that, I must be skeptical of the stories that McCain was responsible for the Forrestal fire. Snopes, Factcheck, and Trughdig all say he was not the cause, as did the article you posted from Rolling Stone. In fact, according to Snopes the revived rumor of his causing the tragedy was revived by ... wait for it ... "a series of pro-Trump fake news web sites."

      I'm not here to praise, but we should not spread what seem to be falsehoods. There are easier, more verifiable aspects to criticize.

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    23. That may be right about the Forrestal fire. I have not been concerned about it before, and cannot say for sure. I can say for sure that McCain should not have been there in that plane when it happened because he was not qualified to be a Navy pilot. Anyway I am against McCain because of how he behaved as a senator. I am not concerned with comparing him with Trump, or McConnell, or Ryan, or Palin, or Pence, or Bush or any of the other Republican presidential candidates. The end results of what these elected officials do, or have done, is very similar, and perhaps even going to make our planet uninhabitable for humankind. They are all venal and self-serving and the enemies of the people. It galls me no end when a villain is lionized and falsely held up as a patriot and hero. It only makes any hope I have for our future less likely to happen.

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    24. Yeah, thanks Eco. That version in the Snopes article is how I remembered it being reported, when it happened.
      I was too young for Vietnam and will not second guess his actions. It appears, from a lot of different sources, that McCain was not a "songbird" either. Hey, thank God that da*n war is over. 
      I wish I had the answers as to how to end the wars we are in now. I know McCain did not have them.

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  36. Oddly enough, two different body parts could also apply to 45, but decorum forbids my mentioning either one here. You could probably figure out which two they are.

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    1. I was thinking along those lines this morning!

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    2. Rearrange the letters PNEIS into the name of an important human body part that is most useful when erect.

      Those who answered 'spine' will be doctors or PAs someday. The rest of us will be posting jokes on the interwebs.

      Btw, my cousin’s daughter just became a PA Friday. . .and she enjoyed the joke.

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    3. Will tRump do hard time now that his Pecker is leaking? Okay, we're all back in 5th grade now.

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    4. WW - sort of stealing my joke above (from Sunday). But that’s ok. Your version is good too.

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    5. Snipper, I just heard it...

      How are your sons doing as ball boys at the U. S. Open?

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    6. They are doing great despite the heat wave. They’re working for many of the top players including stadium courts and it’s exciting to see them on ESPN. Thanks for asking!

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    7. Yeah for them! I would like to be there for the tennis and the tutus, a cross-sport combination.

      I also just read this NYT article about rolling, not throwing the tennis balls, at the U.S. Open:

      https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/21/sports/tennis/wimbledon-u-s-open.html

      Roll on!





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  37. For those who enjoy math puzzles, the current Joseph Young's Puzzleria! (see Blaine's PUZZLE LINKS) is serving up a pretty decent (IMHO) sequence puzzle titled: "Blanks that flank not 'drank' but '8' "
    You can find it on our menus between the "Schpuzzle of the Week" and the seven "Ripping Off Shortz And Young" Entrees.

    LegoWhoIsChallenging"NumberNerds"WithThisPuzzle

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    1. For the ``Blanks that ...'' puzzle, some elements exceed expectations. Some years ago I would have thought, ``Houston, we have a problem.'' Legolambda is a very talented puzzle maker.

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    2. Thank you, FloridaGuy, for those kind words. I love mathematics, but math puzzles are tougher than wordplay puzzles for me to construct.

      LegoSays"BlainesvilleWeHaveAPuzzle...Passion"

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  38. Apropos of nothing, I do contracting work for a government agency. My contracting company has a strongly mixed workforce consisting of people ranging in age from young Millenials, fresh out of college, to late Boomers nearing retirement age (and, at least one woman who they lured out of retirement). I find it refreshing to work with highly intelligent folks of all ages. In a meeting last week, one of the young whipper-snappers mentioned Herbie Hancock, prompting blank stares from his fellow Millenials. Of course, all of the folks in the room over a certain age were familiar with that jazz luminary. One of the 20-somethings I work closely with happens to be named Cecilia. I really want to know if she's heard of the song of the same name, let alone its creators, Simon & Garfunkel.

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  39. Are the letters of the body part in the last name contiguous ?

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  40. Another Bonus Puzzle: Change one letter in the full name of a former candidate for President of the United States and the result will be a well-known mythological creature. What is the name of the candidate and the creature?

    Hint: this was definitely not the nominee of a major political organization, but it did come from a major party.

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    1. I just looked through an entire list of mythological creatures, and nothing even came close to looking like a presidential candidate's full name. Thank God we didn't have that for this week's challenge!

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    2. Cran, this is one where, ironically, youth is not an advantage. The candidate was noted for having a personal interest in opposing pork barrel projects.

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    3. There is speculation that the candidate's demise may have involved cannibalism of a sort.

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    4. I don't have the answer and am looking forward to hearing it! Like Cranberry said, I've looked through several lists and see nothing that looks close!

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    5. I think we can agree that the mythological creature is far better known than the presidential candidate.

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    6. A bit of related trivia:
      Name the only(sorta)known pop song to ever hit the charts that alludes to a possible act of cannibalism, and name the one-hit wonder group who recorded it. Hint: The lead singer(and possible songwriter)would later go on to have a huge solo hit with much lighter lyrical content, the title of which contains a type of alcoholic beverage.

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    7. TIMOTHY by The Buoys c. 1970 and written by Rupert Holmes.

      I did not need the hint.

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    8. Did you know Rupert actually wrote the song in part to see if it could get banned from radio airplay, and somehow this would make it more popular? It also ended up peaking at No. 17 on the charts on April 17, 1971(two days after my first birthday, thanks a lot Buoys). Good thing I was way too young to even know about it. Why would anyone dare release a song about cannibalism in the first place? And does human flesh actually pair well with a pina colada?
      "I was tired of my lady/We'd been together too long...and I was quite hungry, so while she lay there sleepin'..." I'll just stop paraphrasing from there.

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    9. BTW Rupert really only played piano in the track, but he didn't sing lead.

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    10. Human flesh actually pairs well with fava beans and Chianti.

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    11. It was actually eight weeks after April 17 when it reached #17. After the cannibalism controversy had started, the Buoys' label, Sceptre Records, started a rumor that Timothy was a mule, not a person. On Mystery Science Theater 3000, they suggested he was a duck. Either way, it's enough to make anyone lose their appetite. Yuk.

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    12. I disagree. I love that song. Not only that, and please don't tell anyone, but I also love Soylent Green.

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    13. I'd take that song any day over "Brandy" by "Looking Glass" which came out about a year later!
      It seems like dental floss became more accepted shortly after Timothy was released...

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  41. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    1. I remember, I was a kid and watched my mother completely lose it as all the hard work she had done for a certain presidential candidate went down the CTA.

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    2. Liz,
      Was your mother working for the candidate in the bonus puzzle? I know/ knew two central supporters (I didn't know them then, one died about 12 years ago), the other is very much alive and still kicking assets.

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    3. I was responding to Jan's '50 years ago...' I don't have the answer for the bonus puzzle, so I will not mention names. My mother was the campaign chairman for a presidential nominee (key word) in our small county in Indiana. I was 9 at the time. I remember to this day how upset she was.

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    4. Mom went clean for Gene?

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    5. I just realized that I wouldn't mention names, but gave my age for all to see. Yes, Jan. She was vehemently against the war.

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  42. I'm not usually much of a New York exceptionalist, but is there another city whose police department has its own bee squad?

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    1. I can't say I'm at all surprised the New York Police Department would be involved in a sting operation.

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    2. I don't want to bee spreading rumors again, but I did hear some of those officers on the bee squad were fired for having sticky fingers.

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    3. Back in the old days NYC had mostly Irish-Catholic cops, now they've got a bunch of WASP's.

      If you think bees are bad, check out these hornets. I'm torn between feeling sorry for them and memories of a similar, albeit smaller, nest in the back yard when I was young. Nasty buggers.

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    4. Whorenets are what the Vice Squad uses on their undercover operations.

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  43. I'm posting so all the young whippersnappers who "get the solution before getting out of bed" realise that even seniors ( 76, and demented ) can solve some puzzles quickly....this particular one took me only 4 min. to solve !...the shortest time ever !.... Big Ron

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  44. Replies
    1. Another Bonus Puzzle: Name a famous person in sports whose last name contains a body part. The sports(wo)man has a two-word nickname that, after removing the third letter (which is an "e"), anagrams to a chess piece.

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    2. In answer to your question, Leo, I'd probably rather hear Magic Johnson sing.

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  45. Just had a patient with a hemarthrosis, blood in his knee joint after a fall on Sunday. I've been looking forward to that for a few weeks, since it contains both "Earth" and "Mars".

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    1. Indeed, SZ, in order to cap things off, I did.

      SMH at PAs and the things they look forward to. . .

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    2. You're saying no geologist has ever drooled over tourmaliniferous deposits?

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    3. I think geologists look for megaregoliths. Architects are just meanderthals.

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    4. Oh, I've had my fair share of oohing and aahing over deposits of minerals or fossils; there just were no living (at the time) things to have pain. I know what you are saying though; my doctor friend also gets excited about unusual things happening to her patients. It’s the thrill/satisfaction of a new diagnosis (with or without planets in them). ;-)

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    5. Ah, the misadventures of semimatureness! (2 planets each, again.)

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  46. Replies
    1. In the first few minutes Wall-E listens to "La Vie en Rose" performed by Louis Armstrong.

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  47. I’m surprised no one’s mentioned Bruce Cockburn...

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  48. Louis Daniel Armstrong a.k.a. Satchmo > STOMACH

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  49. Louis ARMSTRONG aka SATCHMO → STOMACH.

    “Satchmo” & “Satch” are short for SATCHELMOUTH.

    My hint “cats” anagrams to “SCAT singing.”

    Neil (kneel) Armstrong.

    STING + PRINCE → PINCER.

    Super Hero: STRETCH ARMSTRONG.

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  50. LOUIS ARMSTRONG (SATCHMO -> STOMACH)

    > I can think of one country that isn't mourning John McCain today.

    Good Mo[u]rning, Vietnam featured Armstrong’s What A Wonderful World.

    > You don't know Jack...

    Jack Armstrong, All-American Boy

    >> Or maybe, I'm just tired.
    > Get a grip!

    Armstrong tires grip the road!

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  51. I wrote, “This musician shares a last name with a famous non-musician whose first name is a homonym for something a body can do.” This referred to Neil Armstrong.

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  52. LOUIS ARMSTRONG (ARM); SATCHMO (STOMACH)

    “AVENUES” refers to the Louis Armstrong hit “On the sunny side of the street.” {It also refers to SPEER(s) BLVD, back when I thought the answer was BRITNEY SPEARS (EARS, BRIT, T-RIB}.

    “PC, 2R, 2L” refers to pitcher SATCHEL Page who had six children with those first letters: Pamela Jean Paige, Carolyn Lahoma Paige, Lula Ouida Paige, Linda Sue Paige, Robert LeRoy Paige, Rita Jean Paige.

    “Wow. Look at this view from THE PLAYA today.“ is meant to evoke the Louis Armstrong version of “Stardust.”

    "Third" refers to the third child of William and Kate of Cambridge, LOUIS.

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  53. Louie Armstrong. My clues were, “don’t mean to brag”, which means toot your own horn, “once in a blue (the blues music) moon (neil armstrong).

    Also after my clue “peddling” was rubbed out, I wrote a reply, “ow (Al), you hurt (Hirt) my feelings”. Al Hirt was a protege of Louie Armstrong.

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  54. LOUIS ARMSTRONG, SATCHMO, STOMACH
    My "lip service" comment had to do with Armstrong's lip damage he suffered due to his aggressive style of trumpet playing.
    My "hit the ceiling" comment was in reference to Armstrong ceiling tiles(no relation).
    In the late-50s cartoon "Knightmare Hare", where Bugs Bunny meets up with a knight in a dream sequence after he's been reading about knights, Bugs lists a few of his "friends" that the knight may have heard of, all jazz musicians: "The Duke of Ellington, Count of Basie, Earl of Hines, Cab of Calloway, SATCHMO of ARMSTRONG..."

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  55. the musician's name, as stated, has some controversy. Do you say Loo-ee or Lew-is? Wikipedia discusses this. In Hello Dolly he says "This is Lew-is, Dolly." The "as stated" also refers to his home state, LA, same as his initials.

    another musician associated with this week's answer also contains a body part. Armstrong's mentor was King Oliver

    a variant nickname for this week's answer is a synonym for something this person might do with a different body part. SATCHMO - SATCH = PURSE. One purse's one's lips to play the trumpet.

    The Bonus Puzzles! (I know you've been waiting, sorry I was in meetings all day!)

    1) CHORUS >>> CYPRUS
    2) ANGINA >>> ANGOLA
    3) RHONDA >>> RWANDA
    4) POLLED >>> POLAND
    5) AIRWAY >>> NORWAY
    6) LATINA >>> LATVIA
    Anyone notice the first letters?

    famous American political figure of the past whose last name contains a body part. This person had another title that anagrams to a musician's first and last name. What is the politician's name and title, and the musician's name? >> General George Washington; general anagrams to Al Green.


    Change one letter in the full name of a former candidate for President of the United States and the result will be a well-known mythological creature. What is the name of the candidate and the creature? >> This was more historic than a puzzle, 50 years ago this week the Youth International Party (Yippies, and they did party) had a 145# porcine candiate named Pigasus. I'd heard it on Amy "Good_man"'s broadcast of Democracy Now!

    famous person in sports whose last name contains a body part. The sports(wo)man has a two-word nickname that, after removing the third letter (which is an "e"), anagrams to a chess piece. >> Arnold Palmer, The King - e = knight.

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    1. I may be wrong, but Louie Armstrong was from Chicago, not Louisiana. He did spend a lot of time in La.

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    2. Born and raised in New Orleans (airport named for him), moved to Chicago at 21 or so to join King Oliver.

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    3. My "cannibalism" mention referred to speculation that Pigasus ended up on the dinner table of a Chicago cop.

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    4. Great puzzles and posts! I don't think I'd ever heard of Pigasus. If I did, it went into short term memory, never to be heard from again!

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  56. Snipper, were your mentions of the U.S. Open tennis tournament hints about Louis Armstrong Stadium there in Queens? The larger (Arthur) Ashe stadium there appears in crosswords all the time, but I hadn't realized (until it was mentioned in an article in the Times today that the second-biggest arena at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center was named for Armstrong.

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  57. For legolambda's ``Blanks that ...'' math puzzle:

    The puzzle is based on e = 2.718281828459045235360287471352662497757..., the base of the natural logarithms, known as Euler's number. The missing elements are 5 and 6. The sequence 9, 9, 10, 9, 10, 9, 9, 9, 5, 8, 6, 10, 11, 8, 8, 8, 8 ... is derived by adding successive pairs of digits of e.

    The ``elements exceed[ing] expectations'' are 8 and 9. If pairs of digits occur uniformly over the 100 pairs (0, 0), (0, 1), (0, 2), ... (1, 0), (1, 1), ..., (9, 9), then we would expect 1% of the sums to be 0, 2% to be 1, ..., 9% to be 8, 10% to be 9, 9% to be 11, ..., and 1% to be 18. The puzzle is based on 17 pairs of digits, so we would expect 1.7 sums to be 9, but we have 6, and 1.53 to be 8, but we have 5. So, the number of 8s and 9s appearing exceeds expectations.

    I wrote ``elements exceed expectations'' because I like the alliteration. It didn't hurt that each word begins with e.

    Some years ago there was an NFL team called the Houston Oilers. As legolambda notes on Puzzleria!, Euler is pronounced Oiler.

    The ``very talented'' is a nod to his Chevrolet/Chex/Rolex problem. V and T are the letters changed to X. That said, my comment does express a sincere sentiment.

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    1. Thanks again, FloridaGuy. And, you have provided a wonderful analysis. You must be some kind of statistician!
      What intrigued me when I created the puzzle was that in the first 34 digits of e, the sums of the 17 pairs fluctuated so little. Indeed, 15 of the 17 were in that amazingly narrow 8-through-11 bracket, and 14 of 17 were either 8, 9 or 10! (That's 10 Wow!, not 10-factorial).
      By the way, I just uploaded the new Joseph Young's Puzzleria! (see Blaine's PUZZLE LINKS) about 30 minutes ago. Welcome to all.

      LegoWhoCongratulatesFloridaGuyForNotSlippingUpOnHis"Slick"MathPuzzle

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    2. In rereading your post, FloridaGuy, I again thank you for alluding to the "bell-curve" aspect of the possible sums from 0 to 18. As a mathematics "dabbler" it did not dawn (literally!) on me until now that of course the middling values are more likely to occur.

      LegoWhoHeardThe"Bell"GoOffThanksToFloridaGuyAndNowRecallsThatTheOddsForSixEightAndEspeciallySevenComingUpAreRelativelyGoodWhenRollingParadise!

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  58. My post “Arrivederci Roma (Civitavecchia) in style” referred to the fact that Crystal cruise ships always broadcast What a Wonderful World when leaving port.

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  59. Yes Jan, my references to the US Open (tennis) were clueing Louis Armstrong stadium which “serves” as court 2(deuce) at the tournament. It was actually rebuilt and is debuting in its new form this year. And my boys have worked some matches there this week. (And WW - the tourney “rolls on” into next week.

    I guess Ringo (groin) would have been too easy but the last name didn’t work!

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  60. I clued that "I got this one in three minutes, but I adore this musician's work. I started by thinking of the five hottest artists out there and -- end of story."

    >> Three minutes was the rough length of the 78s on which Armstrong first recorded.

    >> His first groups were the "Hot Fives" and the "Hot Sevens," hence my note about "thinking of the five hottest artists...."

    >> And Satchmo began his career in the now lost Storyville section of New Orleans, hence my note about "end of story."

    Ben

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  61. Bonus Challenge this week.

    Take the last name of a musical family that plays roughly the same kind of music as the musician that is the answer to this weeks challenge. The Family name meets the NEANDERTHAL EMBARRASS SATURATION CONTEMPTUOUSNESS criteria. (but is not composed exclusively of “narrow” or “short” letters)
    Two members of this family are very well-known to fans of that style of music.
    When you take the first name of the younger musician and insert a letter in it, phonetically you get the first name of a famous 20th century politician.
    When you take the first name of the older musician and insert the letters “D” and “T”, you get, reading left to right the last names of two other 20th century politicians. (One American and one Non-American)

    Who are the two related musicians and the three politicians?

    Family name --> MARSalis
    Wynton and Branford Marsalis
    Wynton + "s" --> Wynston or Winston Churchill
    Branford + "dt" --> Brandt-Ford --> Willy Brandt German Chancellor 1969-1974 & Gerald Ford U.S. President 1974-1977.

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  62. The success of this week's on-air player, Andrew Laeuger, was impressive.
    A search for his name unsurprisingly lead to a young man who has many interests and accomplishments.
    There have been several other teenagers make it to the program, but my guess is that the average age of NPR Puzzlers approaches the middle years, so to speak; the many that hail to the "post card days."
    I wonder what the future holds for coming generations with interests like ours.
    I hope luminaries in the field, such as Will Shortz and our own legolambda, have plans for them

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  63. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  64. Next week's challenge: This challenge comes from listener Eric Chaikin of Los Angeles. The name of the film director David Lynch conceals the word AVIDLY in consecutive letters, spanning his first and last names. Can you think of a famous film director whose first and last names conceal a 6-letter name of car, past or present, in consecutive letters?

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    1. Does James Cameron drive a Chevy Camero?

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    2. I congratulate Eric Chaikin on a very nice puzzle. The answer is very satisfying. Thank you, Eric,
      And, thanks also to jan, a great Blainsvillian, for posting these NPR Sunday puzzles at the crack of dawn.

      LegoWhoIsNowWorkingOnRiffOffPuzzlesToPostOnPuzzleria!ForNextFriday'sNewUploading

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    3. Speaking of directors like Cameron, The Car Talk Staff Credits lists their Director of Deep Sea Research as Marianna Trench.

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    4. Over 1500 correct answers this week.

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  65. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    1. Beautiful!
      jan, quit your day job and start a puzzle blog.

      LegoWhoEnviesjan'sCreativity

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    2. Thanks, Lego, but my wife thought it gave too much away.

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  66. Replies
    1. jan,
      Would it be OK with you if I use your "delicious but self-deleted" riff-off puzzle on my Puzzleria! blog this Friday? I would give you credit, of course. (I would just identify you as "jan, a regular poster on Blaine's blog" or by your full name, if you wish.)
      Please let me know below, or email me at jrywriter@aol.com.
      Thank you.

      LegoWhoKnowsAGreatRiffOffWhenHeSeesOne

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    2. Of course, Lego, but isn't the cat already out of the bag?

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    3. Thanks, jan. I will use your riff-off because:
      1. It is ingenious, and
      2.You didn't leave your post up very long. Not that many people saw it.
      Also, my warmest regards to your wonderful wife, but I don't think your riff-off puzzle gave too much away. I doubt if Blaine would have deleted it (although he has been on a bit of "blog-admisistrator-tear" of late).

      LegoSaysLet'sPutTheCatBackInTheBagAndLeaveItThereUntilThisFriday

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